1

votes

Problems with my grain-free dogs!

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 06, 2013 at 4:31 PM

At the moment I have 2 dogs. One is a local desert dog, a saluki mix, and the other (a recent foster) is a greyhound saluki hybrid

Originally I had the small dog on raw meat, but she got a bacterial infection. Now, the dogs are grain free, cooked food and eat chicken hearts, lamb fat, mince and boiled eggs. However, they usually have very soft mushy stools. This is a problem as they're far too soft to poop scoop and impossible to clean.

The only thing that seems to work and give them normal hard poop is porridge.

Does anyone have any hacks for getting normal poop on a cooked grain free diet?

Apparently the traditional diet for the saluki dogs is camel meat, camel milk, olives and dates

11536348c9c2a847ab7d80c6f511c4be

(70)

on July 09, 2013
at 04:32 PM

not personally, but i guess it can't hurt!

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on July 08, 2013
at 11:54 AM

I tried them on raw and they got sick and had to go on antibiotics. At the moment the temperature here is 42C and a lot of the meat comes from far away so I don't think it's safe to put them back on raw, unfortunately.

7dab2d8c97e44d8d0c298e5c9d5d75bc

(641)

on July 07, 2013
at 06:39 AM

Muscle testing is applied kinesiology. It's mainly used by chiropractors and involves energy systems in your body. See: http://www.goodhealthinfo.net/herbalists/muscle_testing.htm I was a real skeptic, and it really does look quite "voodoo"-like. However, I received the same results through muscle testing as I did from my Immunoglobulin G food allergy panel, right down to a high allergy to honeydew melon. It was also only 40 dollars in cost (compared to 700 on the bloodwork) and it is much less invasive. It looks 100% CRAZY, but it really works!

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b

(1031)

on July 07, 2013
at 12:45 AM

There's no denying that bones do make a mess! We've trained our boy to take his bones to his bed, and we use a blanket on his bed that can be chucked into the washing machine. The bones we get are frozen, sometimes instead of thawing them out he gets them in a semifrozen state during the summer; he likes them and they help to cool him down. The raw food comes from a reputable pet food supplier so we're lucky not having to worry about possible contamination.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on July 06, 2013
at 11:21 PM

Natural Balance. Probably not anywhere near as good as a home cooked meal, but, it works. http://www.amazon.com/Natural-Balance-Limited-Ingredient-Potato/product-reviews/B003C5RLGG/

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on July 06, 2013
at 11:03 PM

Paleot what is the name of your dog food?

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on July 06, 2013
at 11:02 PM

I've heard it, too. Have you tried it?

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on July 06, 2013
at 11:01 PM

As I said, I had the small dog and the GSD-mix that I used to foster on a raw diet before, and the small dog didn't take to it well (the GSD loved it), then they got sick and had explosive diarrhea for a week. I gave the small ones marrow bones the other day and she loves it but it makes a horrible mess of her bed (where of course she likes to chew it) and it's too hot outside. I might try again with raw (the saluki greyhound will probably take to it OK) but TBH I'm worried about them getting sick again. Things go off very quickly here

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on July 06, 2013
at 10:58 PM

Muscle testing of the dog's muscles? What is this, can you explain?

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on July 06, 2013
at 10:57 PM

I live in Dubai, UAE, and every vet I've met here has recommended Royal Canine. I will look for one but TBH it's unlikely here. There are maybe 15 vet practices in the entire city

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on July 06, 2013
at 10:56 PM

Tried with dates - ignored. They like meat, and camel milk!

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on July 06, 2013
at 05:00 PM

Maybe you should try feeding them olives and dates?

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on July 06, 2013
at 04:50 PM

My dog eats grain-free sweet potato and bison dog food with salmon oil and vitamins (and the occasional table scraps) and he seems to be happy with it. Poops like a champion breed.

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7 Answers

1
303da756656a877256622dd5dcf0a02e

(157)

on July 07, 2013
at 12:10 AM

Have a look at the article on Marks Daily Apple - http://www.marksdailyapple.com/the-primal-eating-plan-for-dogs/#axzz2YJTRepB2

He says that it can take a couple of days for dogs to get used to the change but it sounds like you've given it a few weeks already? He suggests that giving them raw pumpkin can firm loose stools, and a couple of others have mentioned this as well so I reckon it would be your best bet. Good luck!

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on July 08, 2013
at 11:54 AM

I tried them on raw and they got sick and had to go on antibiotics. At the moment the temperature here is 42C and a lot of the meat comes from far away so I don't think it's safe to put them back on raw, unfortunately.

1
C7fd8c6173e4875900219fc5a66753e0

on July 06, 2013
at 11:49 PM

please consult with your veterinarian on this issue. Look into finding a board certified nutritionist (check out https://vetmed.tennessee.edu/vmc/smallanimalhospital/nutrition/Pages/default.aspx) Homemade formulated diets are often deficient in critical nutrients unless you have someone who knows what they are doing calculating the diet.

0
C0fcb48d7da4f76fac17318efd2cd6b8

on July 07, 2013
at 03:12 AM

Last week our dachshund/cairn terrier 12 pound mix caught and killed and ate an ENTIRE rabbit. The whole thing, poop, ears, legs, tail, hair, meat, guts and all. We waited for him to throw up or bloat or something, but he just carried that rabbit along in his stomach, looked kind of proud- and almost kind of glowed- no kidding! He digested every bit, and we never even found hairy poop- like a coyotes. Even a little pet dog is a version of a wild dog or wolf, I figure. By the way, he does regularly eat bones and some raw meat. Doesn't answer your question, but I just thought it was real interesting to witness that, and consider our "pet" a little differently.

0
C7fd8c6173e4875900219fc5a66753e0

on July 06, 2013
at 11:51 PM

re: the pumpkin - usually given for softening constipated stools, not the other way around.

0
A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b

(1031)

on July 06, 2013
at 09:58 PM

Raw bones. Dogs love them, they're great for their teeth, provide lots of great nutrients and their poops will be small and firm. Unless a dog has metabolic/health problem I don't believe it's fair not to feed them bones. My dog thrives on lamb necks and chicken wings daily. Check out the BARF diet for pets (Biologically Appropriate / Bones And Raw Food).

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b

(1031)

on July 07, 2013
at 12:45 AM

There's no denying that bones do make a mess! We've trained our boy to take his bones to his bed, and we use a blanket on his bed that can be chucked into the washing machine. The bones we get are frozen, sometimes instead of thawing them out he gets them in a semifrozen state during the summer; he likes them and they help to cool him down. The raw food comes from a reputable pet food supplier so we're lucky not having to worry about possible contamination.

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on July 06, 2013
at 11:01 PM

As I said, I had the small dog and the GSD-mix that I used to foster on a raw diet before, and the small dog didn't take to it well (the GSD loved it), then they got sick and had explosive diarrhea for a week. I gave the small ones marrow bones the other day and she loves it but it makes a horrible mess of her bed (where of course she likes to chew it) and it's too hot outside. I might try again with raw (the saluki greyhound will probably take to it OK) but TBH I'm worried about them getting sick again. Things go off very quickly here

0
11536348c9c2a847ab7d80c6f511c4be

on July 06, 2013
at 08:10 PM

vets at my practice recommend trying canned pumpkin to firm up soft stools.

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on July 06, 2013
at 11:02 PM

I've heard it, too. Have you tried it?

11536348c9c2a847ab7d80c6f511c4be

(70)

on July 09, 2013
at 04:32 PM

not personally, but i guess it can't hurt!

0
7dab2d8c97e44d8d0c298e5c9d5d75bc

(641)

on July 06, 2013
at 04:53 PM

I would look into a holistic veterinarian who uses muscle testing. Honestly, that's where your best answers will be about it.

I'm a veterinary student (only my 1st semester). There are holistic vets out there, many of whom believe in grain free and will help! Good luck!

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on July 06, 2013
at 10:57 PM

I live in Dubai, UAE, and every vet I've met here has recommended Royal Canine. I will look for one but TBH it's unlikely here. There are maybe 15 vet practices in the entire city

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on July 06, 2013
at 10:58 PM

Muscle testing of the dog's muscles? What is this, can you explain?

7dab2d8c97e44d8d0c298e5c9d5d75bc

(641)

on July 07, 2013
at 06:39 AM

Muscle testing is applied kinesiology. It's mainly used by chiropractors and involves energy systems in your body. See: http://www.goodhealthinfo.net/herbalists/muscle_testing.htm I was a real skeptic, and it really does look quite "voodoo"-like. However, I received the same results through muscle testing as I did from my Immunoglobulin G food allergy panel, right down to a high allergy to honeydew melon. It was also only 40 dollars in cost (compared to 700 on the bloodwork) and it is much less invasive. It looks 100% CRAZY, but it really works!

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