3

votes

Routine medical procedures

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 09, 2011 at 2:24 PM

What are your thoughts on routine medical procedures? I'm under the impression that I (25, female) only need two annual visits when I'm not sick: A dental checkup and a gyno visit. Is anything else really important (bloodwork, mole scans, optometrist visits, etc?)

What routine checkups do you consider important for children/older adults/ males?

Bcb2f5436d11467e89123680c046b858

(1356)

on September 10, 2011
at 01:25 PM

That said, most people who eat paleo today did not grow up doing so. Many of us have decades of poor diets to overcome. I for one am not taking chances and will go ahead and get my colonoscopy when I turn 50.

Bcb2f5436d11467e89123680c046b858

(1356)

on September 10, 2011
at 01:23 PM

I believe diet has a strong impact on all aspects of health. Colon polyps and colon cancer are Western diseases, and like other Western diseases, are mostly due to lifestyle. Risk factors include the usual suspects: smoking, obesity, lack of exercise. According to CW, diets high in saturated fat & red meat and low in fiber contribute to polyps. Data on this seems contradictory, however. I think following a diet that reduces inflammation would reduce the incidence of polyps, but that's just common-sense thinking and I have nothing to back it up.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on September 09, 2011
at 09:30 PM

You aren't the only one! I get my Vitamin D level checked (via ZRT Testing) twice a year, but otherwise stay away from the medical world.

116d23135449332a8bf9106220cf632b

on September 09, 2011
at 08:10 PM

I'm jaded about eye doctors. I've been through three, and though it seems to me like my eyesight doesn't change, they always give me a stronger prescription which is promptly followed by a week's worth of headaches. I'm kind of under the impression it's a scam.

C5c3a1fb34a486366e45afbb5eaaca05

(453)

on September 09, 2011
at 04:25 PM

I am 20, and the only reason I'm alive today is due to a colonoscopy. Of course, family history and undiagnosed celiac as a child contributed to the likelihood that I would develop polyps, but it's still just a safe precaution.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on September 09, 2011
at 03:53 PM

Plus one........

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on September 09, 2011
at 03:53 PM

If you eat correctly I believe this is not important. 99% of America does not so your assertion is important but in this community I don't think colonoscopies are paramount. I also think paleo women should consider stopping mammograms and instead start using thermography because it is far more sensitive and does not use any radiation. My wife now uses this over the objection of her pcp or ob/gyn

7255a87872b75e6f691d84dca769b87e

on September 09, 2011
at 03:17 PM

Do you believe that one who eats paleo is at less of a risk? What are the diets like of people who come in asymptomatic?

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4 Answers

2
Bcb2f5436d11467e89123680c046b858

(1356)

on September 09, 2011
at 03:13 PM

I'm a GI endoscopy nurse and spend most of my time at work doing colonoscopies. Yes, it's the last thing anyone wants to do, the bowel prep sucks, and it will eat up two days of your life, but I fervently believe it is worth doing. I have seen several early colon cancers in people in their 50s with no symptoms who came in for a routine screening. When caught early, these cancers often need just a simple surgery and no chemo or radiation. If these folks had waited until they were symptomatic, the cancer may well have killed them. Every day we find and remove pre-cancerous polyps - snip, snip, and they are gone. Leave them in for a few more years, and they will slowly grow into a cancer. The colon cancer death rate is steadily dropping thanks to more people coming in for screening. Screening should start at age 50, or earlier if you have a close family member (parent or sibling) who has had colon cancer.

7255a87872b75e6f691d84dca769b87e

on September 09, 2011
at 03:17 PM

Do you believe that one who eats paleo is at less of a risk? What are the diets like of people who come in asymptomatic?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on September 09, 2011
at 03:53 PM

If you eat correctly I believe this is not important. 99% of America does not so your assertion is important but in this community I don't think colonoscopies are paramount. I also think paleo women should consider stopping mammograms and instead start using thermography because it is far more sensitive and does not use any radiation. My wife now uses this over the objection of her pcp or ob/gyn

Bcb2f5436d11467e89123680c046b858

(1356)

on September 10, 2011
at 01:23 PM

I believe diet has a strong impact on all aspects of health. Colon polyps and colon cancer are Western diseases, and like other Western diseases, are mostly due to lifestyle. Risk factors include the usual suspects: smoking, obesity, lack of exercise. According to CW, diets high in saturated fat & red meat and low in fiber contribute to polyps. Data on this seems contradictory, however. I think following a diet that reduces inflammation would reduce the incidence of polyps, but that's just common-sense thinking and I have nothing to back it up.

C5c3a1fb34a486366e45afbb5eaaca05

(453)

on September 09, 2011
at 04:25 PM

I am 20, and the only reason I'm alive today is due to a colonoscopy. Of course, family history and undiagnosed celiac as a child contributed to the likelihood that I would develop polyps, but it's still just a safe precaution.

Bcb2f5436d11467e89123680c046b858

(1356)

on September 10, 2011
at 01:25 PM

That said, most people who eat paleo today did not grow up doing so. Many of us have decades of poor diets to overcome. I for one am not taking chances and will go ahead and get my colonoscopy when I turn 50.

1
48b2a8e6d223d996957e1adaf8877eff

on September 09, 2011
at 04:48 PM

I have not been to a doctor in 15 years. Once I changed my diet all the chronic ailments; yeast infections, allergies, inflammation of gums, all went away. I figure preventative does not mean detection. I prevent illnesses through diet and nutrition. If I went to a doctor, and this is just my opinion, I would not be treated through conventional methods if anything was detected. I guess I would not mind a blood work up. Just me, I live on the edge!

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on September 09, 2011
at 09:30 PM

You aren't the only one! I get my Vitamin D level checked (via ZRT Testing) twice a year, but otherwise stay away from the medical world.

0
A82d8cbea04392ebcb1a819bddc4a259

(190)

on September 10, 2011
at 12:45 AM

I like to see an annual blood panel. You can go to directlabs.com and get the Comprehensive Wellness Profile or pretty much anything you want to look at and at a very reduced price. It is direct to the consumer. The test runs about $97 and once a year they offer it for $59, unless you can get all of those panels from your doctor. What I like most about it is that it includes Thyroid w/TSH.

Now interpretation of those lab results will still be delivered under the standard pathology reference ranges, but if you know the optimal reference ranges or a practitioner that offers a review of these it would be best.

Along with that it is helpful to know annually your adrenal status and I like to see if via saliva (Diagnostechs is my fav). If you get the flexi-matrix you can get a whole range including secretory IgA (gut/immune status), FSH/LH (pituitary) and additional reproductive (testosterone, progesterone, all 3 estrogens and the PG/E ratio) hormones for about $160.

I agree with the thermography. An initial test and then at the discretion of your health care provider. Unless there are some hot spots you shouldn't need one every 3 months as some of them recommend but annually depending on age or longer depending on health status.

So to recap:

  1. Annual serum labwork - a practitioner who uses functional or integrative reference range can tell volumes from these tests alone.
  2. Annual saliva labwork - fleximatrix covers adrenal, hormones and pituitary (which is important if you take birth control)
  3. Occasional thermography - both breast and abdominal images would be optimal
  4. Dental but be on the look out for a mercury free or better dentist.

It really depends on how you are feeling too. Are you in healthy range for body fat, W2H ratio, weight.

Yes, vitamin D measurements are important too. Also CRP and homocystine if you are older or looking for inflammation (HDL is over 80).

So, you can see that there are some basic testing or office visits that are helpful but this may not be a complete list for everyone.

Hope this helps! ~j

0
7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

on September 09, 2011
at 02:36 PM

Personally, I would have routine blood work done every year. You can probably ask your gyno to do it. It's just a good baseline to have, to see the changes each year.

If you don't have insurance, CVS Minute Clinic can do blood glucose, cholesterol and a lipid panel.

http://www.minuteclinic.com/services/labs_and_tests/

I wear glasses, so a once a year eye test is required for me to get new glasses. If you aren't having headaches or trouble seeing, once every 2 years is probably good for your eyes.

116d23135449332a8bf9106220cf632b

on September 09, 2011
at 08:10 PM

I'm jaded about eye doctors. I've been through three, and though it seems to me like my eyesight doesn't change, they always give me a stronger prescription which is promptly followed by a week's worth of headaches. I'm kind of under the impression it's a scam.

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