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On Paleo for a couple of months and had a diverticulitis attack

Commented on March 14, 2014
Created August 26, 2013 at 3:30 AM

Hi, I have lost 55 lbs over the last year and a half, 30 on a meal plan from a nutrition store then I tip toed into paleo about 3 months ago losing 25 more, I am probably 85% Paleo, I feel great, look better all the time, I have been told lately that i look healthy, and that is what i'm going for. I could probably lose another 50 lbs and be ok. I'm 46 yrs old, 4'11" and am currently weighing 168. my bmi is still in the obese range, so i still have a lot of work to do. I have been reading everything i can get my hands on about the paleo lifestyle (started with Wheat Belly) and moved into the Paleo books. So imagine my surprise when i ended up in the emergency room yesterday and admitted with what turned out to be diverticulitis. I just know everyone is going think that this happened because i gave up grains and am not getting enough fiber. I eat lots of veggies and really don't understand why this happened. I believe in the paleo lifestyle and do not want to give it up. Please help me to understand what might have happened here and what I can do to prevent it again without going back on grains.

F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on March 14, 2014
at 08:56 PM

Interesting.. I think my mom's was diagnosed 60+ and she only had occasional attacks... she really didn't change her diet (she was like that) and continued to eat nuts, meat, low fiber. I've been reading articles in Mayo Clinc.com looks like not a lot is known for sure...genetic crap shoot seems most plausibe.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on March 14, 2014
at 08:08 PM

For me, I had just under 12" of colon removed. There were over 1000 diverticulum, and I was only 27. It is rare that people show symptoms before their late 40s. My great-grandfather had diverticulitis (wasn't found until late in his life), but there are no other known cases in my family.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on March 14, 2014
at 08:06 PM

There are a lot of theories as to the cause. From my understanding most of the community has centered on either genetics, or just a genetic lottery. Diet has not been linked to the development or re-occurance rate of diverticulitis (it was in the 60s and 70s, which is where the "no nuts, no meat, high fiber" diverticulitis diet comes from) but recent studies have shown no correlation. Certainly a low-residue diet is best once one has a bout of diverticular disease, but once healthy diet is not associated.

F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on March 14, 2014
at 07:34 PM

@CDone my mom had diverticulitis and ate a typically SAD diet from the 20's through 2008. I've appeared to dodge the bullet. She loved peanuts & nuts in general, always have a jar of Planters (mixed nuts or 100% peanuts). Her MD told her to avoid nuts but she didn't had the occasional attack.

Rather than researching on the web I'd like to her your take on the cause (other than genetics?) cheers

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on March 14, 2014
at 06:43 PM

diet has ZERO correlation to diverticulitis. Mine came while eating a "heart healthy" SAD. I am not a proponent of low carb -- but this is a condition that occurs over a long period of time -- not a result of an abrupt change in diet.

Medium avatar

on March 14, 2014
at 06:20 PM

That is a Paleo train wreck, no matter how much weight you lost. Paul Jaminet developed it while VLCing for more than a year. He also ended up with scurvy, 3 cavities, slow wound-healing, mucosal dryness which impacted his immunity and worsened fungal infections, and an inflamed aorta that could have been thrombogenic. I'd read his account and try to add back carbs. Paleo is not low carb. And, no, it's not a surprise. It's happened before. And will happen again.

http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2010/11/danger-of-zero-carb-diets-iii-scurvy/

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4 Answers

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on March 14, 2014
at 06:01 PM

I had diverticulitis, had surgery to remove the damaged portion. Typically this is the result of long-term damage and genetic pre-disposition. Not a short term dietary change.

Diet is not sufficient to correct diverticulitis, nor is it a proper mitigation strategy.

Best strategy I found is understanding when the pain starts -- and getting your medicine immediately. If you are like the 90%, then you are looking at an attack once every 2-5 years. If you are like me, and in the 10%, this will become progressively worse. Right before my surgery I was having an attack twice a month (essentially as soon as I got off the medication).

Good luck!

F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on March 14, 2014
at 07:34 PM

@CDone my mom had diverticulitis and ate a typically SAD diet from the 20's through 2008. I've appeared to dodge the bullet. She loved peanuts & nuts in general, always have a jar of Planters (mixed nuts or 100% peanuts). Her MD told her to avoid nuts but she didn't had the occasional attack.

Rather than researching on the web I'd like to her your take on the cause (other than genetics?) cheers

0
089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on March 13, 2014
at 12:42 AM

i would definitely cut down on the veggies and fiber. you do not need that much ever. i have ulcerative colitis and my colon cannot take it. i personally think fiber contributes to so many digestive diseases. i focus on resistant starches as my fiber instead of things like greens, broccoli, fruits/veggies with skins. it just does a number on your colon.

0
A048b66e08306d405986b6c04bf5e8e4

on March 12, 2014
at 09:41 PM

Do you have the right gut flora balance? Gut flora balance is just as crucial if not more crucial to healthy elimination than fiber. Take a probiotic suppliment and eat/drink lots of fermented foods/ drinks (kombucha, water kefir, sauerkraut). Do you consume bone broth on a regular basis? the geletain in bone broth draws water into the stool and relaxes the colon muscles, making for easier elimination. Last but certaintly not least, do you use propler bathroom posture? Modern toilets may be great, but the sitting position of the modern toilet does not allow the sphynchter muscle to open properly, which very often results in straining, wereas with going to the bathroom in a squatting position, the sphynchter opens up fully, allowing for effortless elminiation. Invest in a Squatty Potty or keep a footstool in front of your toilet just for that purpose.

EDIT: I've never had diverticulitis, but I still hope i can be of some help

0
6517481053b47a7f45e731561652518c

on March 12, 2014
at 07:00 AM

I recently had a colonoscopy a few months ago and was told I had diverticulosis. Today I was at my doctors because of severe cramping and was told I had diverticulitis. He prescribed a 3 day liquid diet and antibiotics. Hopefully it will take care of an infection in the diverticulosis sacs . Nothing can be done once you get diverticulosis but change to a high fiber diet. Paleo allows all green veggies, high fiber fruit like apples and raspberries and nuts like almonds. You can look up paleo foods for their fiber content. Try asking your doctor if taking Cetrucil or Metamucil tablets can help regulate your system to the point where you will be able to avoid any attacks. What you don't want is to find yourself with diverticulosis complications that may require a colon resection.

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