1

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How do animals handle antinutrients?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 26, 2012 at 8:54 PM

A few secounds ago, I was a little hungry so I ate a tomato. I then thought about all the 'bad antinutrients' in it that I didn't remove with cooking or doing sth similar. Then the following question poped into my mind: How do animals handle all the antinutrients from their plant-based diets? Ruminants or birds of course have completely different digestive systems than we humans have. But apes must have pretty anthropoid digestive systems. Although I have never seen an ape doing anything else than just putting the vegetables in their mouth and chewing it, they seem to tolerate it pretty well. Is the human digestive system simply unfavorable for veggies or are antinutrients not as bad as they are said to be?

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on December 27, 2012
at 03:39 AM

True, though almost no animals actually produce cellulase themselves, they have bacteria that do it for them.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on December 26, 2012
at 10:51 PM

Why the downvotes? +1.

Ee6932fe54ad68039a8d5f7a8caa0468

(2668)

on December 26, 2012
at 09:42 PM

fair enough. my point was to put a check on our orthorexia, not discriminate agains those with nightshad sensitivity, or any other sensitivity for that matter.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on December 26, 2012
at 09:39 PM

^Not everyone. Nightshade sensitivity is a real issue for people, particularly those with arthritis or joint problems.

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3 Answers

2
194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on December 26, 2012
at 11:19 PM

Other animals have different enzymes, some we don't have, like phytase or cellulase.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on December 27, 2012
at 03:39 AM

True, though almost no animals actually produce cellulase themselves, they have bacteria that do it for them.

2
Ee6932fe54ad68039a8d5f7a8caa0468

(2668)

on December 26, 2012
at 09:05 PM

re. animals like apes, i'm not sure. they're still sufficiently different from us, that they can derive most calories from fermenting fiber to short chain fats in their guts.

but what i want to say is, if you're a little hungry and eat a tomato, you really do not need to stop and worry about the 'bad antinutrients' you failed to remove. we're built more robust than that.

Ee6932fe54ad68039a8d5f7a8caa0468

(2668)

on December 26, 2012
at 09:42 PM

fair enough. my point was to put a check on our orthorexia, not discriminate agains those with nightshad sensitivity, or any other sensitivity for that matter.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on December 26, 2012
at 09:39 PM

^Not everyone. Nightshade sensitivity is a real issue for people, particularly those with arthritis or joint problems.

1
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on December 26, 2012
at 10:31 PM

We have a much smaller gut than apes, also for most species as a general rule there is an inverse correlation between brain and gut size since they both require a bunch of energy to run. There are a bunch of different theories, like us learning to cook food, which helps break down the food for digestion and also breaks down anti-nutrients in some foods. Other animals spend more energy on their guts and their guts have evolved to digest more things that to humans might be anti-nutrients, though even cattle still have issues with the anti-nutrients fed to them via grains like corn.

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