2

votes

Will chewing food thoroughly aid leptin sensitivity?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 04, 2011 at 7:27 PM

Since digestion begins in the mouth, and since there are leptin receptors on the tongue, would there be any benefit to digestion, leptin sensitivity, or other processes if the food is chewed extremely well? My whole life, I have 'wolfed' down my food. The military really hammered this approach to eating down--try feeding 2000 troops in 30 minutes with 500 chairs.

Anyway, a lot of stuff my grandma told me is coming back to haunt me (lard is good, don't snack, if you are going to smoke--smoke Camels...for digestion's sake). She always said I ate too fast...should I slow down?

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 05, 2011
at 01:46 AM

Chewing is central to the hypothalamic parotid axis I wrote about. this axis is what signals the incretin hormones in the gut and is the dinner bell for the endo and exocrine pancreas. It also has a ton to do with timing of gut motility in the Nucleus of the solitary tract of the vagus nerve. This afferent tract is completely yoked to the circadian rhythm of how leptin used to work before we evolved the current generation of leptin receptor we have in humans....The Quilt....His response on my answer. Worth putting his stuff togeather

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 05, 2011
at 01:45 AM

Chewing is central to the hypothalamic parotid axis I wrote about. this axis is what signals the incretin hormones in the gut and is the dinner bell for the endo and exocrine pancreas. It also has a ton to do with timing of gut motility in the Nucleus of the solitary tract of the vagus nerve. This afferent tract is completely yoked to the circadian rhythm of how leptin used to work before we evolved the current generation of leptin receptor we have in humans.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 05, 2011
at 12:53 AM

Admitted I'll have to read that again, but as a question how jacked up (since your coming from dental and neurology) is a person who continually grinds their teeth at night? My son actually does this periodically.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 05, 2011
at 12:35 AM

Yup nance, I have read some on his site just too lazy to search out the actual article he was pointing to :). Heck I upvoted his short response to OP as a comment, but I'm glad to draw out some more in depth response.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 05, 2011
at 12:25 AM

So the act of mastication activates the process? Is this a proprioceptive response from mechanical movement or are the responses tempered by specific responses from taste and such indicating which macronutrients are present in the incoming foods? If this is in the axis you wrote about I'll just read that link, but I'm very interested.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 05, 2011
at 12:24 AM

@JayJay: the [Quilt's site](http://jackkruse.com/the-teeth-in-disease/) is pretty hard to miss; because I love your "handle" here's what you requested. No extra charge. :-))

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 05, 2011
at 12:16 AM

Haven't read this particular part of your site yet, but I'll hazard a guess from your comment that this makes chewing gum a bad thing simply due to the act of chewing activating these signaling loops?

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 05, 2011
at 12:01 AM

When you say "I wrote about" feel free to include the link man!

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on November 04, 2011
at 11:55 PM

Chewing is central to the hypothalamic parotid axis I wrote about. this axis is what signals the incretin hormones in the gut and is the dinner bell for the endo and exocrine pancreas. It also has a ton to do with timing of gut motility in the Nucleus of the solitary tract of the vagus nerve. This afferent tract is completely yoked to the circadian rhythm of how leptin used to work before we evolved the current generation of leptin receptor we have in humans

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on November 04, 2011
at 10:25 PM

chewing well is rarely done and it is a huge help especially to T2D and to those with leaky guts.

  • 61a27a8b7ec2264b1821923b271eaf54

    asked by

    (3175)
  • Views
    2.3K
  • Last Activity
    1404D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

4
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:35 PM

Yeah, I was always told not to eat so fast and I grew up to be a binge eater. So I guess they were right and I start every meal with a salad now to introduce the concept of chewing. I also avoid the most tender cuts of meat, but that's about money.

One thing on the digestion-in-mouth question; at the mere thought of food, saliva pours into my mouth but I'm sure chewing thoroughly helps break up the food so the saliva can do its' work.

If he's still talking to us after the last few days, we have a world-class expert on leptin in our community. He's kinda busy saving lives and stuff but if he sees your question you'll get the definitive answer.

1
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 04, 2011
at 11:50 PM

There are a number of biochemical reasons to chew well relating to enzymes in saliva and mechanical breakdown improving digestion, but from another perspective it just slows you down a bit. The signaling of fullness to the brain is a bit of a delayed response, so taking your time eating can be a good thing if you are of the "listen to your body" camp. Of course if you are leptin resistant then you are likely not a part of this camp, but nothing bad can come of including this as a "healthy habit"....no downside/side-effects other than better absorption of ingested food.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 05, 2011
at 12:24 AM

@JayJay: the [Quilt's site](http://jackkruse.com/the-teeth-in-disease/) is pretty hard to miss; because I love your "handle" here's what you requested. No extra charge. :-))

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 05, 2011
at 12:25 AM

So the act of mastication activates the process? Is this a proprioceptive response from mechanical movement or are the responses tempered by specific responses from taste and such indicating which macronutrients are present in the incoming foods? If this is in the axis you wrote about I'll just read that link, but I'm very interested.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 05, 2011
at 12:01 AM

When you say "I wrote about" feel free to include the link man!

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 05, 2011
at 12:53 AM

Admitted I'll have to read that again, but as a question how jacked up (since your coming from dental and neurology) is a person who continually grinds their teeth at night? My son actually does this periodically.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on November 04, 2011
at 11:55 PM

Chewing is central to the hypothalamic parotid axis I wrote about. this axis is what signals the incretin hormones in the gut and is the dinner bell for the endo and exocrine pancreas. It also has a ton to do with timing of gut motility in the Nucleus of the solitary tract of the vagus nerve. This afferent tract is completely yoked to the circadian rhythm of how leptin used to work before we evolved the current generation of leptin receptor we have in humans

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 05, 2011
at 12:16 AM

Haven't read this particular part of your site yet, but I'll hazard a guess from your comment that this makes chewing gum a bad thing simply due to the act of chewing activating these signaling loops?

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 05, 2011
at 12:35 AM

Yup nance, I have read some on his site just too lazy to search out the actual article he was pointing to :). Heck I upvoted his short response to OP as a comment, but I'm glad to draw out some more in depth response.

1
E167c0387a5f0b87bb1f2c3e6aec73a8

(1240)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:37 PM

chewing is important. i know ground meat dsnt give me as much satiety as a rib eye...

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!