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Which meats do you eat the most of?

Commented on April 04, 2014
Created April 02, 2014 at 6:08 PM

Hi all,

5.5 year vegetarian broke it off last week to go paleo. I began with some fish and have been buying grassfed beef/bacon/organic chicken etc...

It's great and all but going to get expensive fast. At work (where I eat 50-75% of my meals) we have organic grassfed ground beef (N.S. Troutmans) and wild caught cod fish. I can eat these as much as I want. All the other meats are conventional CAFO stuff which I want to avoid. We do buy bell and Evans chicken (antibiotic free and veg fed) but it's still extremely mass produced so I'm iffy.

So my question is what is a good breakdown of meats? (50% beef, 20% chicken, 15% pork, 15% seafood)? I just made these numbers up they mean nothing but I want to see what other people eat/think.

Also I am 5'6" about 160lbs. Pretty muscular (heavy lift 3-4 days a week) no cardio. Goal is to keep gaining muscle and feel good.

Thanks in advance,

Jon

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on April 04, 2014
at 07:06 PM

Oh i see what you mean, yeah I agree 100%. Your absolutely right about Bison, it is delicious but if overcooked can dry out pretty quick. Welcome to PaleoHacks btw.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 04, 2014
at 06:16 PM

Read his biography The Apprentice if you get a chance (another thing I learned on Paleohacks).

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on April 04, 2014
at 03:09 PM

Pepin is the man....french food is so damn good, and so easy to turn into awesome Paleo dishes, specially if you're doing keto, everything has tons of butter, olive oil and fat ususally with veggies and meats.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 04, 2014
at 02:05 PM

Pepin was on the other night cooking sweetbread chunks in a saute with chopped vegetables (mirepoix). Mmmmmm....

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 04, 2014
at 02:01 PM

We have a butcher that grinds anything. I'll bet ground filet is even better but I don't want to pay to find out. I should have had him grind a couple of scrap rib steaks I bought cheap, just to mix all that fat in.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on April 04, 2014
at 01:51 PM

I also think Bison is a bit too lean, it does taste delicious, but it can be a bit dry. Beef is nice in that it's fattier and has more flavor. I don't see why low-fat would be desired, specially from a ruminant animal, so no need to choose Bison over beef for health reasons. Fat is perfectly healthy, specially from good cattle.

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on April 04, 2014
at 03:40 AM

@CavemanAthlete for me, bison is just too lean - which is a bummer because I wanted to love it.

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on April 04, 2014
at 03:37 AM

I've been experimenting with adding lentils back into my diet and so far so good ...

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on April 04, 2014
at 03:34 AM

We found something in common! A love of tongue! I'm going to buy one tomorrow and braise it - succulent is totally the right word. I try to get my friends on board, but they are squeamish. No big deal, more for me!

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on April 04, 2014
at 03:31 AM

It's SO GOOD - I get my butcher to grind with extra fat and it really is heaven as far in giving me that deep, beefy taste and a nice moist product for making a perfect medium rare patty. Top with an egg = delectable! And a special grind is still cheap!

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on April 03, 2014
at 09:06 PM

Ostrich, really? Where do you find that? I've never seen that sold in any supermarket, and trust me I go to some really weird ones with all kinds of bizarre food.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on April 03, 2014
at 08:44 PM

Damn, that sucks for you guys, seems like a lot of folks on here are based off the midwest. Luckily for me being a seafood lover, i live in South Florida so I am only minutes away from the Atlantic, an hour away from the Caribbean and 2 hours from the Gulf of Mexico. So I am never far from my favorite food source :)

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 03, 2014
at 07:59 PM

I still have an Arcachon oyster box I kept for decor. French oysters are small compared to US Pacifics, though bigger than the wild Olympias I was picking a year ago. NOT in the Midwest. Sigh.

Medium avatar

(624)

on April 03, 2014
at 04:51 PM

In the simplest terms:

PUFA's are "essential" fats in that we need them in our diet.

PUFA's are highly oxidizable and cause all sorts of damage (not just from free radicals but mostly that)

Omega 3 is anti-inflammatory while omega 6 is pro-inflammatory. We need both, but the modern diet is dramatically higher in omega 6 than 3, leading to systemic inflamation.

Minimize overall PUFA consumption by avoiding industrial seed oils and an excess of nuts (other than macadamia eat as much as you like of that).

Balance 6 with 3.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on April 03, 2014
at 04:01 PM

Wow, I envy you, I wish I could get that many fresh oysters for only 9 bucks :) You're right, in the midwest fish doesn't make much sense (unless we're talking catfish, walleye, pike and other freshwater fish if you have access to that). And yes I was speaking strictly about micronutrients, however you're absolutely right, cows are much better for satisfying energy requirements and in terms of fats, because seafood by itself is far too lean.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on April 03, 2014
at 03:51 PM

Yeah, but some noob might believe it. I guess my comment was more of a disclaimer to the paleo newbies. Paleo doesn't have to mean spending $20/lb on grass fed bison steak.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 03, 2014
at 02:52 PM

I've been eating some exceptional ground sirloin for the last week.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on April 03, 2014
at 02:35 PM

Cavemen knew how to use hyperbole, obviously.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on April 03, 2014
at 01:40 PM

I know right?! Cow tongue is delicious, super tender and succulent. I use a pressure cooker and it comes out awesome.

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on April 03, 2014
at 02:14 AM

You are right. OTOH, nowadays pretty much everyone has accepted that there is lots of evidence for legumes being paleo. Once you have beans in your diet, thiamine and other things are not an issue.

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on April 03, 2014
at 02:12 AM

TG, I used to live near the atlantic coast in France and I would buy 55 or 56 count oyster boxes for about 9 bucks. Then I would eat 48 and my wife would eat the rest. I love oysters. but I guarantee you in the midwest this comparison (by equal weights) makes no sense due to availability and cost. I may agree with you re: micronutrient density. But whole cow has more fats and is fresh.

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on April 03, 2014
at 01:13 AM

COW TONGUE! One of my favorite things to eat and so budget friendly! Very easy to make in a slow cooker as well - not challenging even for someone who doesn't have alot of time or cooking skills. Lengua is the BEST!

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on April 02, 2014
at 11:29 PM

@glib why do you say he will still be eating grains and beans? The OP says he used to be a vegetarian, currently paleo.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on April 02, 2014
at 09:59 PM

I would argue that pound for pound, seafood is far more nutritious. For example: sardines and oysters vs. beef.

Sardines: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/finfish-and-shellfish-products/4114/2

Oysters: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/finfish-and-shellfish-products/4189/2

Beef sirloin steak: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/beef-products/3792/2

When making the comparison choose 100g as a serving that way you could compare it pound-for-pound. Otherwise it's not really fair to compare a tiny 85 grams of oysters vs. a huge 1.5 pound steak.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on April 02, 2014
at 08:53 PM

I'm not sure why you're so paranoid about a few PUFAs. Honestly, it's not poison, it's a necessary nutrient (I'm referring to linoleic acid). Besides, the issue with peroxide radicals is concerning only so far as there is an insufficient supply of catalase or endogenous antioxidants (uric acid, bilirubin, etc.) within the cells. You should note that reductive stress (the opposite of oxidative stress) can also be harmful. The human body's own fat tissue is around 10% polyunsaturated fat, so that is a sign that it can be handled in moderate amounts without causing massive inflammation.

Medium avatar

(624)

on April 02, 2014
at 08:23 PM

Still not sure how you justify all the PUFA's in your fat-centric diet...

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on April 02, 2014
at 08:16 PM

Still, if someone can't afford grass-fed, CAFO is still better than nothing. I wouldn't call it "poison", I mean, it is food after all.

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10 Answers

0
Medium avatar

on April 04, 2014
at 06:02 PM

@TheGastronomer I completelyagree fat is good, especially from a healthy grass fed animal. Thought i would just incude a good description for people to get a better understanding. I love the tase of Buffalo but you have to be very careful preparing cause it tends to get dry.

Thanks for the comment!!!

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on April 04, 2014
at 07:06 PM

Oh i see what you mean, yeah I agree 100%. Your absolutely right about Bison, it is delicious but if overcooked can dry out pretty quick. Welcome to PaleoHacks btw.

0
Medium avatar

on April 03, 2014
at 08:55 PM

Great Questions and great responses by everyone. Here is my breakdown. I noticed not too many people have mentioned Buffalo Meat but if you have the opportunity I recommend Buffalo. Great taste very low in fat and high protien. Just a little hard to find and pricey.

1. Fish (25%)

2. Chicken (25%)

3. Beef (25%)

4. Buffalo (Bison) (15%)

5. Venison (5%)

6. Ostrich (5%)

@saloukas Good Luck!!!! Please let me know how it goes for you.

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on April 04, 2014
at 03:40 AM

@CavemanAthlete for me, bison is just too lean - which is a bummer because I wanted to love it.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on April 03, 2014
at 09:06 PM

Ostrich, really? Where do you find that? I've never seen that sold in any supermarket, and trust me I go to some really weird ones with all kinds of bizarre food.

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on April 03, 2014
at 12:23 PM

Eggs > Beef > Pork > Fish >> Chicken ~ Others

I've been on an egg kick for the last few months… just love eating them with just about anything.

Beef… so high only because it's what's raised on the farm. I fill up a huge cooler full whenever I visit family, so some 30 pounds of beef for free… grass-fed, organic (essentially)…

Pork… my favorite. Don't have much of it available from the farm, only buying a pig occasionally.

Fish… I'm landlocked… like seriously. I love seafood, but it's hardly optimal for me to have it shipped in fresh… frozen is ok.

Chicken… I don't like chicken. It's bland… its texture is awful. I'll cook it once in a great while, usually roasted whole.

Others… mostly venison. I don't particularly like it. But again, with 3 hunters in the family, there's no shortage of it and generally they're pushing it on me because there's too much of it.

Overall, it's all preferences. I don't eat one thing or another because it's more "paleo" or whatever. I eat a varied enough diet that nutrients aren't an issue.

0
1719fbfd9286ced367cae8f12a3798fa

on April 03, 2014
at 12:15 AM

Thank you guys this has been very helpful. I will continue to eat ground beef / cod at work in large amounts and on my own will buy organ meats/offal and other seafood, and occasionally pork/chicken. I also forgot to mention I eat 4-6 pastured eggs a day for the pasts 3 years of being "vegetarian".

@glib I haven't and won't be consuming any grains/beans.

I do not really understand the PUFA 6/3 thing? Can someone explain more clearly?

Medium avatar

(624)

on April 03, 2014
at 04:51 PM

In the simplest terms:

PUFA's are "essential" fats in that we need them in our diet.

PUFA's are highly oxidizable and cause all sorts of damage (not just from free radicals but mostly that)

Omega 3 is anti-inflammatory while omega 6 is pro-inflammatory. We need both, but the modern diet is dramatically higher in omega 6 than 3, leading to systemic inflamation.

Minimize overall PUFA consumption by avoiding industrial seed oils and an excess of nuts (other than macadamia eat as much as you like of that).

Balance 6 with 3.

0
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on April 02, 2014
at 09:43 PM

I think you can eat just beef, since you will still be eating grains/beans and those bring in plenty thiamine. Beef is zinc, and IMHO the most nutritious meat in a mixed diet (other ruminants are similar, but beef is always cheaper) . But get offal and bones.

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on April 02, 2014
at 11:29 PM

@glib why do you say he will still be eating grains and beans? The OP says he used to be a vegetarian, currently paleo.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on April 02, 2014
at 09:59 PM

I would argue that pound for pound, seafood is far more nutritious. For example: sardines and oysters vs. beef.

Sardines: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/finfish-and-shellfish-products/4114/2

Oysters: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/finfish-and-shellfish-products/4189/2

Beef sirloin steak: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/beef-products/3792/2

When making the comparison choose 100g as a serving that way you could compare it pound-for-pound. Otherwise it's not really fair to compare a tiny 85 grams of oysters vs. a huge 1.5 pound steak.

0
618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on April 02, 2014
at 09:27 PM

1- Beef - (Ground 20% fat, cuts for stews and soups - not as pricey as steaks)

2- Pork (Belly primarily - not bacon, boneless ribs for braising)

3- Seafood (Oysters/Salmon/Octopus/Sardines)

4 - Eggs - I eat one every day.

Don't find much joy in chicken and I love lamb but eat it rarely.

You can do alot on a budget with canned sardines and ground beef. If you know how to cook, you'll be able to make any cheap cut of meat delicious. Good luck!

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 03, 2014
at 02:52 PM

I've been eating some exceptional ground sirloin for the last week.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 04, 2014
at 02:01 PM

We have a butcher that grinds anything. I'll bet ground filet is even better but I don't want to pay to find out. I should have had him grind a couple of scrap rib steaks I bought cheap, just to mix all that fat in.

0
Medium avatar

on April 02, 2014
at 08:17 PM

First of all, WHERE DO YOU WORK and can you hook me up with a job?

I'd say beef>fish>pork>chicken.

I'm not going to apply an arbitrary ratio to these but I'll offer my intuitive justification and let you reach your own conclusions.

First, PUFA's should be limited. Even omega 3, assuming you keep n6/n3 in a good balance, somewhere between 6/1 and 1/2 daily (it's okay if it varies) but there's a lot of debate about this.

Grass fed beef has a reasonable n6/n3 ratio and is packed with other nutrients missing in CAFO meat, while having a relatively small overall PUFA content. It also has a nice mix of SFA and MUFA. Grain fed beef isn't bad though in a pinch. Still low in overall PUFA's.

Fish has micronutrients you'll be hard pressed to get elsewhere, plus helps keep that n6/n3 ratio pushed to the 3 side. However, much of the fat is PUFA and hence highly oxidizable. I wouldn't recommend it as your primary protein source.

Pork has lots of omega 6 and PUFA in general. Even pasture raised pork... But it's also got a good amount of thiamine which you might be lacking on a paleo diet. It's not a terrible meat in moderation and who doesn't love bacon?

Chicken is the bad one. It has the most PUFA's, the most omega 6, and worst of all it's INCREDIBLY difficult to find quality pastured chicken. Just because it says "cage free" doesn't mean it's been raised in a way I feel comfortable with. It's cheap though so in a pinch, I do eat some. Plus it's delicious.

0
D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on April 02, 2014
at 08:08 PM

all pasture raised or wild

Bison 40% (I live in north america so it only makes sense)

Chicken 20% includes eggs (I raise my own)

Pork 5%

Salmon 10%

Crab 5%

Venison 5%

beef 10%

lamb 5%

CAFO meat is poison

0
Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on April 02, 2014
at 07:58 PM

Meats I eat most in order of greatest consumption:

1. Fish. I love all saltwater fish, big and small: sardines, herring, tuna, salmon, swordfish, mahi-mahi, snapper, cod, flounder, grouper, etc. Other seafood as well: mussels, clams, oysters, calamari.

2. Pork. Specially the fatty cuts like salt pork, pork belly, pork sausage, Pate made from pork liver and pork fat, and sometimes pork shoulder (Boston butt) and ribs. The lean cuts like pork loin don't really appeal to me (too dry).

3. Poultry. Duck (all of it, specially duck fat), chicken organs like livers and hearts and fatty cuts like thighs and wings. Lots of eggs (technically not poultry, but if you think about it, eating an egg is nutritionally equivalent to eating a baby chick).

4. Lamb and Beef. I prefer lamb, always have, because I like the strong gamy flavor. I usually eat the leg, because that's all I can find here. I like the fatty cuts most when it comes to beef, usually the ribeye steaks, oxtail, strip loin, etc. I also go for cow tongue, calf liver and thymus (sweetbreads) every now and then, it's good stuff.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 04, 2014
at 02:05 PM

Pepin was on the other night cooking sweetbread chunks in a saute with chopped vegetables (mirepoix). Mmmmmm....

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on April 03, 2014
at 01:13 AM

COW TONGUE! One of my favorite things to eat and so budget friendly! Very easy to make in a slow cooker as well - not challenging even for someone who doesn't have alot of time or cooking skills. Lengua is the BEST!

Medium avatar

(624)

on April 02, 2014
at 08:23 PM

Still not sure how you justify all the PUFA's in your fat-centric diet...

0
7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 02, 2014
at 06:22 PM

I don't think there is a black and white answer to this.

Certainly fish is probably agreed upon as the best meat, atleast if its a fatty fish as these really help your Omega3 ratio. Beef is probably the second as far as paleo is concerned as it has more fat and a better Omega3 balance than chicken - chicken/lean meats are prefered in conventional diets. I would put pork and chicken in the 3rd and 4rd spot in no order, again it would depend on what you need.

Pork is useful as it contains thiamin, something myself and many paleors don't get enough of as its usually found in grains. chicken has lots more protien, so if you wanted to up your protein without eating more meat then substituting chicken could be a good way of doing this.

TL:DR- Fish->Beef->Chicken/Pork - Set your own quantities based on the nutritional needs of your own diet/lifestyle.

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