1

votes

What's this raw food diet lark?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created April 11, 2013 at 3:51 PM

Can someone debunk this please, I'm getting awfully confused

Protein does not create protein in your body. Amino acids create protein in your body. And the best source of amino acids are leafy green vegetables.

When you eat meat, fish, or chicken, you?????re not getting as much protein as you think you are. Take chicken, for example. Say there are 20 grams of protein in a chicken breast. Once you cook it, you destroy half the protein. Now your body has to digest and assimilate this heavy, dense source of 10 grams of protein, that will take up to 100 hours. How much do you think is getting stuck in your body as toxic waste by the time it reaches your colon? How much protein from a cooked chicken breast will you actually get? Maybe a few grams, if you?????re lucky.

When I speak to bodybuilders and athletes about this, they often insist that animal protein is the best protein available. If it?????s such a good source, why do they need so much of it? Some of my bodybuilding friends feel it necessary to eat large portions of meat with each of their six daily meals!

Many green vegetables are excellent sources of high quality protein. A bowl of uncooked greens or sprouts may only contain a few grams of protein, but you can digest and assimilate all of it because they still have all of their vitamins, minerals, and enzymes intact. This makes this protein far more useful to your body.

You Come Out Ahead In Two Ways:

First, you?????re getting high quality protein without the other harsh and dangerous substances, like hormones, antibiotics, chemicals, drugs, and other unknown substances forced upon farm animals to make them as fat as possible in the cheapest possible way. Second, you?????re getting a lot more protein while eating a lot less food.

In Conscious Eating, Gabriel Cousins writes: ?????According to the American Dietetic Association, pure vegetarian diets in America usually contain twice the required protein for one?????s daily need. Harvard researchers have found that it is difficult to have a vegetarian diet that will produce a protein deficiency unless there is an excess of vegetarian junk foods and sweets. In fact, if vegetarian protein is consumed in its live state, even less protein is needed because research shows that one half of the assimilable protein is destroyed by cooking.?????

John Robbins, in Diet for a New America reports: ?????If we ate nothing but wheat (which is 17% protein) or oatmeal (15% protein) or pumpkin (15% protein), we would easily have more than enough protein. If we ate nothing but cabbage (22% protein) we?????d have over double the maximum we might needs. In fact, if we ate nothing but the lowly potato (11% protein) we would still be getting enough protein. This fact does not mean potatoes are a particularly high protein source. They are not. Almost all plant foods provide more. What it does show, however, is just how low our protein needs really are. There have been occasions in which people have been forced to satisfy their entire nutritional needs with potatoes and water alone. I wouldn?????t recommend the idea to anyone, but under deprived circumstances it has been done. Individuals who have lived for lengthy periods of time under those conditions showed no signs whatsoever of protein deficiency, though other vitamin and mineral deficiencies have occurred.?????

Consider The Sources Of The ?????Information????? You?????re Getting!

Robbins also notes that the National Dairy Council has spent tens of millions of dollars to make us believe that osteoporosis can be prevented by drinking more milk and eating more dairy products. Yet throughout the world, he reports, the incidence of osteoporosis correlates directly with protein intake. Recent research has shown that with a greater intake of meat and diary products, there is a higher rate of osteoporosis?????not the other way around! In fact, the world health statistics show that osteoporosis is more common in precisely those countries where dairy products are consumed in large quantities: the United States, Finland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom.

Most of the research that has been done on protein has been funded by the meat and dairy industry. We have all been taught, in school, from television, from our parents , to drink our milk so we will grow up with healthy bodies and strong bones. In his book, Living Foods for Optimal Health, Brian Clement agrees: ?????Unfortunately the meat and dairy industries speak louder then medical journals. Their multimillion-dollar advertising campaigns ignore what even the most conservative medical investigators no longer deny - excess protein robs our bodies of strength. With their high protein content, milk and meat actually contribute to the accelerating development of osteoporosis. Certainly most people do not know that one teaspoon of sea kelp mixed in a glass of water gives approximately a thousand times more calcium (without animal protein) then an eight ounce glass of milk. You can bet you won?????t hear that information pop up in a catchy jingle. This false fan fare is not new. Remember when the manufacturers of Wonder Bread convinced your family in the 1960?????s that white bread could build strong bones in twelve ways? Wonder has since had to recant. But we were ?????duped.?????

The more protein in our diets, the more calcium we lose. Eating a high protein diet rich in dairy products is not a good way to get your calcium. Your best sources are green, leafy vegetables such as collards, kale, cabbage, lettuce, along with apricots, figs, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, almonds, and other raw foods.

Intuitive Eating author Humbart Santillo writes: ?????On a low protein diet, less calcium is needed since the body doesn?????t need additional calcium to neutralize the by-products of heavy protein consumption. Moreover, the high phosphorus content of protein foods causes a lowering of calcium in the blood, and this leads to calcium loss in the bones. When one starts lowering the protein content and increasing the amounts of vegetables and fruit in the diet, blood calcium normalizes, and calcium loss from bones is diminished.?????

Numerous studies directly oppose the National Dairy Council?????s recommendation of 1200 milligrams of calcium per day. For example, the Medical Tribune reported, in a major study in 1984, that ?????vegetarians were found to have significantly stronger bones.?????

Take a look at these statistics from researchers at Michigan State and other major universities. They found that, in the United States, by age 65, that:

? Male vegetarians had an average bone loss of 3% ? Male meat -eaters had an average bone loss of 7% ? Female vegetarians had an average bone loss of 18% ? Female meat-eaters had an average bone loss of 35%

Another study published in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that calcium supplementation has no effect on the rate osteoporosis occurs as compared to women who took no supplementation.

Nathan Pritikin also points out an interesting fact about osteoporosis:

?????African Bantu women take in only 350 milligrams of calcium per day. They bear nine children during their lifetime and breastfeed them for two years. They never have calcium deficiency, seldom break a bone, rarely lose a tooth. Their children grow up nice and strong. How can they do that on 350 milligrams of calcium a day when the National Dairy Council?????s recommendation is 1200 milligrams? It?????s very simple. They?????re on a low protein diet that doesn?????t kick the calcium out of the body?????In our country, those who can afford it are eating 20% of their total calories in protein, which guarantees negative mineral balance, not only of calcium but of magnesium, zinc and iron. It?????s all directly related to the amount of protein you eat.?????

When People Say ?????I?????m Craving Protein?????????? David Wolfe points out in Sunfood Diet Success System, ?????When someone says `I need protein,????? what they really need and want is fat. Most people and nutritionists cannot distinguish between the desire for fat and the desire for protein. People can give up steak much easier than cheese, because steak is mostly protein whereas cheese is mostly fat.?????

High animal and dairy protein consumers tend to experience higher rates of breast cancer, 40% more coronary disease, more hypertension, 2.3 times more colon cancer, 3.6 times more prostate cancer, and 10 times more lung cancer than non meat eaters.

As far back as 1961, The Journal of the American Medical Association estimated that 97% of heart disease could be prevented by a vegetarian diet!

Kidney stones are also a serious problem resulting from too much protein. Excessive protein puts an enormous amount of stress on the kidneys. It doesn?????t just disappear from the body. Kidneys have to work very hard to get rid of it, and it can begin to degenerate the kidneys and to cause hypertrophy and inflammation.

Recent research is debunking many other previously held ?????truths.????? Take iron, for example. Vegetarians suffer less from anemia than meat-eaters, yet most people do not believe this. Why? Because we?????ve been told by the meat industry that the best source of iron is - you guessed it - meat!

Gabriel Cousins, author of Conscious Eating has this to say about anemia:

?????Why do vegetarians have less anemia? The answer, I believe, lies in the leafy greens, which often have a higher concentration of iron than flesh foods. For example, according to the USDA Handbook No. 456, gram for gram, kale has fourteen times more iron than red meat. Spinach, Popeye?????s comic strip power food, has approximately eleven times the iron as ground beef. Strawberries, cabbage, bell peppers, and even cucumbers have more iron per weight than ground beef or sirloin steak. Researchers have also found that Vitamin C, which is high in fruits and vegetables, significantly enhances the body?????s ability to assimilate iron.?????

More important than what we eat is what we can digest and assimilate.

42cd0feeeda5fa2e2fe1c4fd8255073a

(1930)

on April 12, 2013
at 12:20 AM

Please excuse me for not reading either the question or your answer but I +1 purely on the basis for you taking the time to answer!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on April 11, 2013
at 11:04 PM

+1 for the stick-to-it-iveness to go over the whole thing. I trust you did it all right. ;)

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on April 11, 2013
at 11:03 PM

Agreed on the iron per calorie metric. That's how foods should be compared.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on April 11, 2013
at 10:23 PM

I assume they're talking about iron concentration per calorie, rather than per gram. And I agree with that. Comparing different kinds of food gram-for-gram doesn't make much sense, unless you're packing for a hike...

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b

(1031)

on April 11, 2013
at 10:09 PM

I like your work!

89fa2da4805b0b4e54b77a5a20a2e206

(2097)

on April 11, 2013
at 08:44 PM

re : paragraph #2 and coincidently # 2 lol- and heres more http://www.gnolls.org/1444/does-meat-rot-in-your-colon-no-what-does-beans-grains-and-vegetables/

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on April 11, 2013
at 08:43 PM

True protein needs are low, but I have seen numbers on folks not meeting protein needs to be 10-20% of the population, higher proportion when you get to geriatrics.

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on April 11, 2013
at 07:26 PM

You see that I had to break it up into paragraphs to read it all. I think I would have passed out if I read it all at once.

B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on April 11, 2013
at 07:21 PM

Wow. I can't believe you read that whole load of #&*@!

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on April 11, 2013
at 04:50 PM

I made it to the second paragraph, before I was overcome with pain from stupidity.

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5 Answers

13
3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on April 11, 2013
at 05:39 PM

Please note, I have nothing against leafy green veggies and push eating them as much as possible.

Paragraph 1: Yes, your body makes protein out of amino acids. Yes, your body has to break down proteins to get the amino acids. No, plants are NOT the best source. They're rarely a complete source at that. And the body still has to break down the proteins in plants as well.

Paragraph 2: There's about 20-40 grams of protein in a chicken breast, but that's neither here nor there. Cooking makes the protein more bio-available, not "Destroys" it, unless you're burning it to a crisp. Um, it doesn't take 100 hours (4 days?) to assimilate. If you remember from elementary school science class, that big organ called the stomach is filled with hydrochloric acid, which combined with peptides, makes short work of protein. It's almost like the very first step (after saliva) is to break down large amounts of protein. No, it doesn't get stuck in your gut. I've seen plenty of plant material come out, but never undigested meat. If they've ever had a colonoscopy (or seen a colostomy bag), they'd realize that meat is digested really quickly and plant material isn't. How many grams do you get from the chicken? Almost all. And you get all of the amino acids.

Paragraph 3: Body builders need a lot of protein because they are building lots of muscles, which are made from the complete spectrum of amino acids. Vegetarian body builders supplement with whey and soy proteins. Building muscles require a lot of protein. You can't build gigantic muscles on plant materials alone. Talk to any body builder.

Paragraph 4: Yes, leafy greens are great for a lot of reasons. Cooking food can destroy certain enzymes and minerals but it also makes certain things easier to digest and assimilate, like, I don't know, protein? Also, uncooked vegetables take longer to break down, slowing down your time to assimilate the incomplete amino acids in the protein in those raw vegetables.

Paragraph 5: Finally, something we agree on. You're right! Eating commercially raised animals does expose you to hormones and anti-biotics and other unnatural stuff. However, saying you can get your protein eating less food by eating veggies is wrong. Spinach is 3 grams per cup, so using their low estimate of 20 grams per chicken breast, you'd have to eat 7 cups of spinach, or one chicken breast.

Paragraph 6: The only references I see about Harvard making this statement is on vegan and raw food blogs. Nothing in this paragraph comes close to matching anything that actually happens in the human body. Most vegetarians get their complete proteins by breaking down their own muscles. I guess that's what they mean by not being deficient? The only good thing in this paragraph is that they mentioned it's bad to eat a lot of sweets.

Paragraph 7: Once again, a very biased statement, and it talks about protein and not full spectrum amino acids. You can get the RDA of protein, and still be missing out on essential amino acids. Where does your body turn to? It's own muscles.

Paragraph 8: Osteoporosis is high in countries with high refined carb intake, not just high dairy intake. And high soda intake, and high wheat, etc. This is the typical correlation and causation confusion that people use to push their points.

Paragraph 9: Even more research is paid for by big agriculture and big pharmacy. You're quoting some of it now!

Paragraph 10-16: Calcium supplementation doesn't seem to help too much and leafy greens are a good source of calcium. I don't know if it's better than dairy, however, or other sources. And they keep referencing how meat protein decreases calcium absorption. I'd like a good reference on that one. I have read that insoluble fiber (like from wheat) can block absorption of calcium, but that's an article for another time.

Paragraph 17: Go ahead and pick any hunter-gatherer tribe out there and you'll see the same results regardless of protein intake. The common thread is that they don't eat overly processed foods.

Paragraph 18: MMM.. Fat. Maybe so. Maybe we're confusing our need for fat with a need for protein. Let's go out and get a nice fatty piece of raw broccoli. What? How about fatty lettuce?

Paragraph 19: All true, but we've discussed the eating habits of Standard American Diets where they don't care about the sources of their food. It's the lifestyle, not just the food. Also, we've discussed the reporting methods. "Do you eat processed red meat?" "Like what?" "Like 100 calories of pepperoni on 1500 calories of pizza."

Paragraph 20: 1961? Yes, that is about the time the obesity epidemic took off, isn't it? That's shortly after the Ancel Keys debacle that got our country into the unhealthiest country in the world! Sure, vegetarianism is better, for the most part, than going to McDonalds and Pizza Hut everyday.

Paragraph 21: Excessive sugar damages kidneys. The statement that protein damages kidneys gets thrown around quite a bit, probably because the kidneys filter protein out of the blood stream, and it gets damaged in diabetics, especially when they have ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis is when the body can't burn the sugar in the blood stream and builds up extremely high levels of ketones. The blood sugar level is still high. Those of us who get into ketosis every once in a while haven't seemed to experience any issues. Let me repeat, the kidneys filter protein. They're made to do it. Pure MYTH. By the way, my vegetarian brother and a few of his friends started getting kidney stones galore as they got older. Nothing scientific there, just an observation.

Paragraph 22: Pardon? I guess if you eat a lot of iron fortified breakfast cereals, you're not going to be anemic. I can't find any (Non-vegetarian) sources that say that vegetarians have less anemia than meat eaters. Anemia doesn't seem to be a big issue unless you have an eating disorder.

Paragraph 23: The only way this paragraph can be true is if you accept all of the other information to be true as well. Otherwise, it's a continuation of the wrong hypothesis.

This article was lifted, word for word (including the messed up characters) from a raw vegan site. I can't find any other references to much of anything here, and nothing in the medical journal, save a few out of context items.

Eating raw veggies is a GOOD thing, but it's not the only thing.

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b

(1031)

on April 11, 2013
at 10:09 PM

I like your work!

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on April 11, 2013
at 07:26 PM

You see that I had to break it up into paragraphs to read it all. I think I would have passed out if I read it all at once.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on April 11, 2013
at 11:04 PM

+1 for the stick-to-it-iveness to go over the whole thing. I trust you did it all right. ;)

89fa2da4805b0b4e54b77a5a20a2e206

(2097)

on April 11, 2013
at 08:44 PM

re : paragraph #2 and coincidently # 2 lol- and heres more http://www.gnolls.org/1444/does-meat-rot-in-your-colon-no-what-does-beans-grains-and-vegetables/

42cd0feeeda5fa2e2fe1c4fd8255073a

(1930)

on April 12, 2013
at 12:20 AM

Please excuse me for not reading either the question or your answer but I +1 purely on the basis for you taking the time to answer!

B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on April 11, 2013
at 07:21 PM

Wow. I can't believe you read that whole load of #&*@!

4
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on April 11, 2013
at 05:14 PM

I just wanted to add one note, since the author of the crazy above talks about protein needs a lot.

Protein need is actually very, very low compared to what most people -- v*gan or omnivore -- intake. The author of the crazy is not wrong about this. The range is usually stated as 40-50g of protein. Why this number? To get the right amino acids? Nope. It's the minimum amount needed to get bioavailable nitrogen, which is extremely rare (comparatively) in nature; in no small part due to the fact that you can't really eat elemental nitrogen -- it has to be bound organically to other molecules. Lightning bolts (seriously) and bacteria that grow on legumes are known to fix nitrogen naturally. Artificially fixed fertilizer is what truly allowed our human population to grow to the size it is now, well beyond earlier hypothetical maximums. See the Haber???Bosch process for more info.

Optimal protein is very person-specific or goal oriented. A mass-gainer or body-builder, v*gan or omnivore, will have better results with a higher protein (and carb!) diet than usual, be it from soy protein isolate or natural protein. Granted, I know which dense protein source I prefer. Same with carbs - that same bodybuilder could slug down some maltodextrin in a shake or eat a beet -- what appeals to you?

I'm off topic now. ;-)

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on April 11, 2013
at 08:43 PM

True protein needs are low, but I have seen numbers on folks not meeting protein needs to be 10-20% of the population, higher proportion when you get to geriatrics.

4
77188106a9c27a22ad47d0ef7318de7a

(922)

on April 11, 2013
at 04:46 PM

This is basically vegan propaganda. I am on a highly raw diet at the moment, but eating completely raw is out of the question. Cooking your food allows you to eat a lot more calories through a lot less bulk. Cooking is what made us human as the decreased need for gut length allowed our brains to grow. I eat lots of raw fruits and vegetables, in fact this is the bulk of my diet. But I still need to cook my meat, fish, and some vegetables, and even some fruits like squash. Without cooking vegetables, squash, meat and fish I highly doubt my body could get enough calories, fats from solely raw plants.

4
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on April 11, 2013
at 04:41 PM

I couldn't make it past the first sentence. Just so wrong. Nature doesn't just let free amino acids hang out, they're polymerized into proteins. Which our body and our cooking processes break down into amino acids.

Jumped to the last paragraph... simple cronometer fact check. 100 grams of ground beef is 32% DV ion. 100 grams of spinach... 34% DV. 100 grams of kale... a mere 18% DV. So much misinformation, why bother with anything more?

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on April 11, 2013
at 04:50 PM

I made it to the second paragraph, before I was overcome with pain from stupidity.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on April 11, 2013
at 10:23 PM

I assume they're talking about iron concentration per calorie, rather than per gram. And I agree with that. Comparing different kinds of food gram-for-gram doesn't make much sense, unless you're packing for a hike...

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on April 11, 2013
at 11:03 PM

Agreed on the iron per calorie metric. That's how foods should be compared.

3
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on April 11, 2013
at 04:56 PM

Think of it as outsourcing digestion. We cook foods, proteins breakdown into easier to digest forms.
Our guts are a lot smaller than most primates and it is due, in no small part, to cooking our food.

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