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What are some early historical texts that contributed to the paleo movement?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 24, 2010 at 8:26 PM

Here is one- before paleo was 'paleo', Banting was there. great prize-winning summary article (Sophie Coe Prize, 2002 Oxford Symposium on Food History): http://www.second-opinions.co.uk/banting.html

full text (free): http://books.google.ca/books?id=OWUivKrZ4zgC&printsec=frontcover&dq=banting+william&source=bl&ots=zHxoaC5HsO&sig=4C-IlaZU1v3LqK1IQjoY8mt-Kw8&hl=en&ei=FSV0TOOrIMTflgeBhNnICA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CCwQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q&f=false

Any other great texts from other eras?

3eafb88d6a6d762fcfa8ed4eb0576260

(642)

on August 29, 2010
at 08:13 PM

True, but it goes to show that neolithic foods not subjected to industrial processing can be just as healthy as paleolithic foods.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on August 27, 2010
at 08:44 PM

SOme of the peoples profiled were "paleo", others weren't.

3eafb88d6a6d762fcfa8ed4eb0576260

(642)

on August 25, 2010
at 06:02 PM

I'm halfway through Nutrition and Physical Degeneration and it is excellent so far, but it's a little strange to cite it as support for a paleo diet while ignoring that the very first isolated group profiled (the Swiss) were found to thrive on an anti-paleo diet of grains and dairy, with very little meat.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on August 25, 2010
at 06:49 AM

I looove the whole text of "Nutrition and Physical Degeneration"! Great add! Looking forward to reading the other.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on August 24, 2010
at 09:15 PM

I had to make this one a question. This is a question site, so great stuff, but it has to be a question.

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4 Answers

3
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on August 24, 2010
at 09:13 PM

This is a great topic because many of these texts are free. Here is Nutrition and Physical Degeneration by Weston A. Price. And My Life With The Eskimo by Vilhjalmur Stefansson (famous for experimenting with all-meat diet, proving it could support health).

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on August 27, 2010
at 08:44 PM

SOme of the peoples profiled were "paleo", others weren't.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on August 25, 2010
at 06:49 AM

I looove the whole text of "Nutrition and Physical Degeneration"! Great add! Looking forward to reading the other.

3eafb88d6a6d762fcfa8ed4eb0576260

(642)

on August 25, 2010
at 06:02 PM

I'm halfway through Nutrition and Physical Degeneration and it is excellent so far, but it's a little strange to cite it as support for a paleo diet while ignoring that the very first isolated group profiled (the Swiss) were found to thrive on an anti-paleo diet of grains and dairy, with very little meat.

3eafb88d6a6d762fcfa8ed4eb0576260

(642)

on August 29, 2010
at 08:13 PM

True, but it goes to show that neolithic foods not subjected to industrial processing can be just as healthy as paleolithic foods.

1
47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on August 27, 2010
at 07:53 PM

Gathering together some things that have been posted on PaNu recently, quite interesting:

Here is something shorter by Stefansson, something he wrote for Harper's in 1935: "Adventures in Diet." Here's the opening text, you might have seen it before: "In 1906 I went to the Arctic with the food tastes and beliefs of the average American. By 1918, after eleven years as an Eskimo among Eskimos, I had learned things which caused me to shed most of those beliefs."

Here is the book Kranker Magen, kranker Darm (1995) by Wolfgang Lutz, who not-so-famously published his low-carb book Leben ohne Brot (Life without Bread) in 1967, five years before Atkins. The link to Kranker Magen, kranker Darm is to a German text, but I found a translation of chapter 7 of Leben ohne Brot online. Leben ohne Brot was also re-worked into an English version along with Christian B. Allan in 2000, Life without Bread.

And here's an obscure one from the 1907 issue of the Dietetic and Hygienic Gazette, A. Edward Davis's "Diet as a therapeutic measure in certain eye diseases."

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 12, 2010
at 09:51 PM

not sure that being one of an "early historical texts contributed to the paleo movement", but just didn't know where to put it: i'm reading a book about Dante and his time, and alongside other aspects the author touches the issue of food prices and diet:

"... the workman of Edward the Third's day earned enough in four days to buy a whole sheep and a gallon of ale. So plentiful was meat in England that it was the ordinary diet of the poor. A preamble of an act of Parliament of the fourteenth century in specifying beef, pork, mutton and veal declares that these are "the food of the poorest sort..."

(John Theodore Slattery, Dante the Central man of all the world, 1920)

it's funny thing how the 'poor's' diet reversed from prot/fat to carbs

0
Ce0b5fd94b1034e96cf710b6f138c29d

on August 28, 2010
at 03:45 PM

Paul Shepard's Coming Home to the Pleistocene: http://www.amazon.com/Coming-Home-Pleistocene-Paul-Shepard/dp/1559635908/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1283010176&sr=1-1

Everybody, not just Paleos, should read it; simply put it's an excellent guide to what human beings are, and makes some very convincing (and very Paleo) recommendations about what they need to be happy. It goes way beyond just diet and exercise, to make the point that industrial society has done for the human psyche what the SAD has done for human health.

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