2

votes

Toddler getting enough fat?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 25, 2012 at 2:27 AM

Hi!

I have a 22 month old. We are Primal family (mostly). My son eats like a... well, a toddler. Some days he eats a lot, some a little, some days he wants everything I make him, somedays not.

Typically he eats an egg fried in grass fed lard with fruit for lunch. Sometimes bacon or sausage instead of egg.

He doesn't typically eat a snack in the am because he naps so early. So he will eat lunch 3 hours later and it's leftovers, or nitrate free deli meat, but typically some protein and a fruit.

Snacks are hard- he sometimes will eat nutbutter, sometimes fruit, sometimes ricotta bites, sometimes sausage bites. Really not consistent.

And this is where his diet gets rough because he gets so hungry before dinner. Usually 30 mins before he will be clinging to my leg and screaming for food while I'm trying to make supper. Dinner is usually protein with veggies (which he refuses to eat) and salad.

I'm thinking he needs more fat in his diet. But what? He won't eat avocado. I might be able to get him to eat a spoonful of coconut oil if I could flavor it somehow. But I wonder if he ate more fat, maybe he would not get so hungry?

What are your thoughts? Thanks so much!

7bab99c303f1e83d3d9722a414dd7b45

(524)

on November 25, 2012
at 03:29 PM

Agreed, I would definitely not give peanut butter (at all really) but we waited until lil' one was 2 with peanuts and now I wish she'd never had it all because she prefers it to any other nut butter. As with any new food you introduce to a toddler, start with a small amount and watch to see if any reactions that might be a sensitivity or allergy appear. Introduce only one new food at a time too.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on November 25, 2012
at 12:19 PM

Careful with nuts and toddlers or babies. I know peanuts aren't nuts, but one of our kids developed a dangerous peanut allergy because he was exposed to peanut butter when he was around a year old. Maybe wait until they're older.

Ba99a15e6bf870b81286791617050593

(671)

on November 25, 2012
at 10:51 AM

"I'm pretty sure he has some internal wisdom about it." I love that; I wonder how much we could learn about diets just by allowing toddlers to make all of the snacking choices. Obviously we couldn't present a full smorgasbord of choices. We'd wind up with a bunch of babies noshing mac & cheese all day. But presented with a paleo spectrum, what is most natural for kids, before their palates are tainted by culture and circumstance and all of the other foods we still crave from SAD days.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on November 25, 2012
at 10:16 AM

I forgot to add. Try to get some DHA in there too, even if you have to supplement it with fish oil. Human breastmilk is incredibly unique in its high percentage of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially DHA. breastmilk from indigenous traditional people (even inland) tends to have a much higher omega 3 to 6 ratio than industrialized nation's breastmilk.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on November 25, 2012
at 10:08 AM

Most toddlers need lots of fat. Especially if they are weaned from breastfeeding. I would agree with you when it comes to adults but babies truly need those fats. No one is suggesting we make a toddler eat low carb, but their brains are rapidly growing and HEALTHY human breastmilk, as compared to cow milk ranges from about 4.5% to almost 9%!!! Considering the paleo or even woman of 100 years ago would have breastfed on average to about 3-4 years old, the importance of fat cannot be understated.

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on November 25, 2012
at 08:14 AM

yeah, continuing breasteeding is the best option here

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 25, 2012
at 04:17 AM

More fat is not the answer to everything.

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6 Answers

3
1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

on November 25, 2012
at 10:01 AM

My toddler still breastfeeds BUT I still like to get good fats in to him. A few ways to do that are blended soups like creamy butternut squash soup and then I blend ghee and coconut oil in to it with an immersion blender. I also do this with his chicken and parsnip soup. It makes it so creamy and delicious! If your son is good with dairy you can add cream too.

Another way is my coconut mousse/whipped cream. First take hardened cream off the top of a refrigerated can of coconut milk and whip in a food processor until it has the consistency of whipped cream. Then add overripe banana or sweet baked carrots (I know it sounds weird but it's really yummy) and it makes a delectable mousse.

Finally, I added egg yolks to EVERYTHING!!! meat balls, soup, yogurt, everything... if a yolk can fit in undetected, it goes right in.

Just to add, though. Sometimes my son goes through days when all he wants are bananas and apples or some days all he eats is sausage and and berries. I try to let him lead me. If he doesn't want to eat any of the above, I don't force it on him. I'm pretty sure he has some internal wisdom about it.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on November 25, 2012
at 10:16 AM

I forgot to add. Try to get some DHA in there too, even if you have to supplement it with fish oil. Human breastmilk is incredibly unique in its high percentage of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially DHA. breastmilk from indigenous traditional people (even inland) tends to have a much higher omega 3 to 6 ratio than industrialized nation's breastmilk.

Ba99a15e6bf870b81286791617050593

(671)

on November 25, 2012
at 10:51 AM

"I'm pretty sure he has some internal wisdom about it." I love that; I wonder how much we could learn about diets just by allowing toddlers to make all of the snacking choices. Obviously we couldn't present a full smorgasbord of choices. We'd wind up with a bunch of babies noshing mac & cheese all day. But presented with a paleo spectrum, what is most natural for kids, before their palates are tainted by culture and circumstance and all of the other foods we still crave from SAD days.

3
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on November 25, 2012
at 04:52 AM

Have you tried bone marrow with him yet? My son is 3 and loves to poke his finger in and retrieve the marrow from bone-in lamb chops (I never get it for myself anymore, sigh). I also leave about 1/2-1" of meat around the bone for him to gnaw on, which he has enjoyed immensely since early teething.

If you serve dairy in your house I've found that there is nothing more alluring to small children than a stick of butter. Give him a hunk of butter, small cheese knife, and some primal crackers or vegetable slices to spread it on and let him go to town.

Here's a recipe: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/paleo-primal-cracker-recipe/#axzz2DCrY2YGH

When we were in the phase where he was nursing less, but still really into milk I also gave the little guy small glasses of half and half or heavy cream and pieces of fruit to tide him over when I was trying to cook dinner. Bell pepper slices with dip were another favorite appetizer for him. This also helped during those times that he was too cranky or tired by the time dinner was really ready (and wouldn't have eaten due to melting down) I at least knew that I got some nourishment into him. It took me a few years to realize that it is a lot more peaceful during dinner anyway if he ate first and then played or watched something while we ate second shift. I actually got to eat then too.

2
44894358c1cd33674c22850cc9368959

on November 26, 2012
at 10:52 AM

Is this a joke? You're child eats eggs fried in lard and sausages and you're worried about him not getting "enough' fat? It sounds too high in fat and carbohydrate deficient.

2
7bab99c303f1e83d3d9722a414dd7b45

(524)

on November 25, 2012
at 04:05 AM

Are you still breastfeeding? That would cover all the bases right there.

What about nut milks? Raw milk cheeses? Full-fat yogurt?

My 3 year old LOVES coconut butter, just straight up. She used to eat coconut oil by the spoonful. Coconut flour pancakes heavy on the coconut milk and oil with all the eggs would be great as well.

What about more eggs? Mine will eat hardboiled yolks, they're a fun little yellow ball.

She loves avocado so I'm lucky there.

Nuts and seeds. You can make crackers with veg and seeds and/or nuts. Soak them first.

Does he have a favourite fruit? If so, let him have at 'er.

We go through phases of eating a ton of apples, or a ton of bananas (4 in a day once!) or nothing but blueberries. I really believe children are in tune with their bodies in the sense that if they have always been given clean, healthy, natural foods - they will naturally gravitate towards what they need at any given time.

With toddlers you can look more at a week or two even, to see if nutritional needs are being met.

As for meats, what about meatballs? Or chicken 'fingers' or nuggets with a dipping sauce? These are fun finger foods and can easily be made with lots of extra fat if you want.

I'm sure there are more great ideas out there, these are just quickly before I sign out. Your post caught my eye since I have a 3 year old, and the changes in my diet to no grains and no sugar etc. took some adjusting :)

OH! Smoothies! Seriously, a secret weapon of mine for getting the lil' one to eat almost anything, as long as it's not a funky colour and has enough sweet fruit I can put nearly anything in there. And freeze smoothies into popsicles. What toddler doesn't love a cold popsicle?!

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on November 25, 2012
at 12:19 PM

Careful with nuts and toddlers or babies. I know peanuts aren't nuts, but one of our kids developed a dangerous peanut allergy because he was exposed to peanut butter when he was around a year old. Maybe wait until they're older.

7bab99c303f1e83d3d9722a414dd7b45

(524)

on November 25, 2012
at 03:29 PM

Agreed, I would definitely not give peanut butter (at all really) but we waited until lil' one was 2 with peanuts and now I wish she'd never had it all because she prefers it to any other nut butter. As with any new food you introduce to a toddler, start with a small amount and watch to see if any reactions that might be a sensitivity or allergy appear. Introduce only one new food at a time too.

2
Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

on November 25, 2012
at 02:35 AM

I have no idea what I'm talking about, so please don't get defensive... but, isn't it reasonable to continue breastfeeding into the toddler stage? I can't imagine being more complete than that. At least supplementally.

Again, please just excuse me if I'm wrong. Spare me the negative whacks...

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on November 25, 2012
at 08:14 AM

yeah, continuing breasteeding is the best option here

1
C8549e3ab0e3d77910e72c87cb5e0918

(435)

on November 26, 2012
at 02:23 AM

Sounds to me like maybe he could do with some more starch available to him too. Will he eat things like potatoes and sweet potatoes?

Also, it could simply be that he needs to eat his dinner earlier.

If you do want to add more fat, if he will eat lightly cooked berries then a lot of butter can be added to that. Almond pancakes will absorb a lot of fat, too.

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