4

votes

The Pleistocene Diet - Your thoughts?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created February 19, 2010 at 11:08 PM

Give this link a quick read and let me know your opinions. This is partly discussion, but I would like to know what the Paleo Community thinks of this.

http://eatingoffthefoodgrid.blogspot.com/2009/10/pleistocene-diet.html

I don't disagree or agree with this thought, just wanted to bring it to the attention of people. All comments are greatly appreciated!

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on September 28, 2011
at 01:13 AM

Plus one........

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on September 28, 2011
at 01:12 AM

Minus one........

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on September 28, 2011
at 01:12 AM

Plus one.......

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on September 28, 2011
at 01:12 AM

I bleed patients with ferritin all the time Its an acute phase reactant that tracks fructose absorption

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 27, 2011
at 08:49 PM

leaching for fun and profit. I should write a book...

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6

(2437)

on September 27, 2011
at 06:41 PM

For example, blue eyes are only 6,000 yrs old http://www.livescience.com/9578-common-ancestor-blue-eyes.html

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on June 18, 2011
at 09:25 AM

Hmmm...I never pig out on rice. The very thought gags me unless its rice pudding, lol.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on October 25, 2010
at 08:05 PM

Matthias, I replied to that Primal Wisdom post with this link (http://www.aquaticape.org), and then Don removed his post...

8287c6ddae0d78eae0a09fdd5999617c

(2581)

on September 29, 2010
at 08:08 PM

My response to the aquatic ape theory is that humans can't swim unless we learn how to. Swimming should come naturally to aquatic mammals. Ever heard of a dolphin that can't swim? Me neither.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on April 19, 2010
at 12:24 PM

The wet-footed ape hypothesis :)

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 21, 2010
at 11:26 PM

Aquatic ape posits we had an ancestor that spent most of its time in the water...a sort of dolphin ape, which is pretty ridiculous. The waterside hypothesis simply says we fished, gathered shellfish, might have swam sometimes.

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on February 21, 2010
at 05:00 PM

what's the difference between the aquatic ape hypothesis and the waterside hypothesis?

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on February 20, 2010
at 06:36 PM

Definitely worthy of discussion!

5ad1c5e83d71e9d83942df6c6f0c4b6a

on February 20, 2010
at 12:19 AM

I know it's not very scientific, but just someone's opinion, worthy of discussion.

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11 Answers

best answer

6
93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on February 19, 2010
at 11:27 PM

Interesting -- however,

A) I don't think we should get caught up in semantics i.e. Paleolithic versus Pleistocene -- as both are driving at the same thing: eating in a species specific and appropriate manner.

The author of the post posits that:

But what if our food-genes were actually set way before the Paleo times? By the time of the Paleoithic, human beings were fully human, and were already far different from other primates. In the era where those changes happened, humans became, from a food perspective, far different than their primate cousins and in fact different from most mammals on earth.

I would suggest that she read

The 10,000 Year Explosion: How Civilization Accelerated Human Evolution

which suggests otherwise. In fact, it makes a strong case for the complete opposite - namely, many of our preferences and evolutionary adaptations are recent!

Some anecdotal evidence to support this would be differences in alcohol metabolization between races.

B) I don't buy the idea of ferritin and having to bleed ourselves. Sounds like nonsense to me.

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6

(2437)

on September 27, 2011
at 06:41 PM

For example, blue eyes are only 6,000 yrs old http://www.livescience.com/9578-common-ancestor-blue-eyes.html

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 27, 2011
at 08:49 PM

leaching for fun and profit. I should write a book...

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on September 28, 2011
at 01:12 AM

I bleed patients with ferritin all the time Its an acute phase reactant that tracks fructose absorption

4
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 20, 2010
at 10:10 PM

Check this out The Original Econiche of the Genus Homo: Open Plain or Waterside? by Marc Verhaegen The aquatic ape hypothesis is bunk. It's too bad it's still distracting from the VERY STRONG evidence that we are shore dwellers.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 21, 2010
at 11:26 PM

Aquatic ape posits we had an ancestor that spent most of its time in the water...a sort of dolphin ape, which is pretty ridiculous. The waterside hypothesis simply says we fished, gathered shellfish, might have swam sometimes.

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on February 21, 2010
at 05:00 PM

what's the difference between the aquatic ape hypothesis and the waterside hypothesis?

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on April 19, 2010
at 12:24 PM

The wet-footed ape hypothesis :)

8287c6ddae0d78eae0a09fdd5999617c

(2581)

on September 29, 2010
at 08:08 PM

My response to the aquatic ape theory is that humans can't swim unless we learn how to. Swimming should come naturally to aquatic mammals. Ever heard of a dolphin that can't swim? Me neither.

4
F790593f27fcafdd9af5ca21e28ecbaa

(40)

on February 20, 2010
at 12:49 AM

Q: Wouldn't there be an impact on the epigenome as a result of the shift away from hunter gather to civilization?

*The idea being that different genes would be turned on/off depending on this change in the environment. That could explain the changes seen at the 10k year mark.

*By changing the environment, at least based on diet, you could impact your own epigenome.

*I am no anthropologist, but have heard of the aquatic-ape hypothesis before. Agree would like to see citations to anthropological work.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquatic_ape_hypothesis

*I find the post persuasive, but I have doubts about eating rice before civilization. Rice is very difficult to cultivate. Also, I just don't see munching down on grains as something I would do, if scavenging for food. The blood letting is a bit weird too.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on September 28, 2011
at 01:12 AM

Plus one.......

3
75d8240448cdde7af3bc385ecdb91946

on September 27, 2011
at 11:18 AM

This "thorough and serious critique of the aquatic ape theory" is uninformed, misleading & irrelevant ("dolphins"), full of false "facts", and has nothing to do with "waterside" ideas today. The miserable level of this "thorough and serious critique" is that author didn't even grasp that when I said that "I believe everything until it's proven wrong", this was obviously about on the savanna ideas... Of course, AAT has nothing to do with dolphin-like human ancestors: the littoral theory is about Pleistocene Homo populations (it has also nothing to do with australopiths) spreading to different continents (& islands, eg, Flores) along coasts & from there inland (even in savannas...) along rivers, where our ancestors collected waterside & aquatic foods, eg, cray + shellfish, turtles + eggs, stranded whales, herbivores killed or drown in mud or shallow water, cattails, river salmon etc. For current ideas on australopith & ape evolution, please google "aquarboreal". For current ideas on Homo evolution, google "econiche Homo", or read our 2011 paper "Pachyosteosclerosis suggests archaic Homo frequently collected sessile littoral foods" in HOMO J compar hum Biol 62:237-247.

2
B4313b18cc03036a6147543d7b0872d6

(566)

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

I'm quite skeptical. For example, is there evidence that humans were all/mostly shore dwellers--especially near salt water? This seems to be an underlying assumption for the claims.

2
71e078b9000a360364fd039bae64dabf

on September 27, 2011
at 01:26 PM

For example, is there evidence that humans were all/mostly shore dwellers--especially near salt water?

Yes, beginning on the southern Cape coast of South Afric around 160,000 years ago. This is where some of the earliest evidence for modern human behaviour is found (burnt ochre, shell beads etc). See Marean et al. (2007). Early human use of marine resources and pigment in South Africa during the middle Pleistocene. Nature 449 905-909.

1
149af6e19a06675614dfbb6838a7d7c0

on September 27, 2011
at 04:50 PM

Dan Akroyd of SNL fame has webbed feet. When I question people..."if all human beings are gone, you are the last one left, 15 years go by and you are lonely, which animal would you consider as a mate?" The number 1 answer is the dolphin...Flipper love. To me that proves that we are aquatic apes or at least smooth wet skin lovers.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on September 28, 2011
at 01:13 AM

Plus one........

1
89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on October 25, 2010
at 08:03 PM

for a thorough and serious critique of the aquatic ape theory see:

http://www.aquaticape.org/

1
95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on February 21, 2010
at 09:19 PM

The whole ferritin thing is dubious. I'd like to see some sourcing on that one.

That said... in a diet based on 21st century seafood I'd worry about all the heavy-metal content, and the problem with eating rice is that you usually end up eating a LOT of rice, as we all know. I can certainly think of worse diets, but I'm not feeling like I should rush to embrace this one.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on June 18, 2011
at 09:25 AM

Hmmm...I never pig out on rice. The very thought gags me unless its rice pudding, lol.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on September 28, 2011
at 01:12 AM

Minus one........

1
C33ef4828dc2f274508d6825f9a21269

on February 20, 2010
at 11:00 AM

Don from Primal Wisdom had a very nice post on the aquatic ape theory where he basically gave some very compelling arguments for that hypothesis, but somehow, that blog post is gone now. Weird.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on October 25, 2010
at 08:05 PM

Matthias, I replied to that Primal Wisdom post with this link (http://www.aquaticape.org), and then Don removed his post...

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