6

votes

Scrambled eggs are bad for you??

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 08, 2010 at 2:09 AM

I was flipping through a book, "The Fat Resistance Diet", which definitely is not Paleo, but I noticed he said to not eat eggs scrambled because the cholesterol will be oxidized and therefore unhealthy. I had never heard this before but I would like to know if scrambled eggs are a healthy choice or not, since I eat large amounts of them. What's the verdict?

Note: He didn't say anything bad about eggs, just scrambled eggs.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 06, 2013
at 04:49 PM

"nutritious white"? Egg white is pretty much the least nutritious part of the egg!

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on December 30, 2012
at 09:34 PM

Those eggs are laced with citric acid to inhibit bacterial growth.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on October 25, 2012
at 02:48 PM

What they mean is cook scrambled eggs lightly -- not necessarily the mixing part. However, over-mixing the eggs removes texture.

C8b2136ef95ba6aac211825ff38cc0e9

(971)

on August 10, 2012
at 04:54 PM

What about hollandaise sauce?

C16f43595a71c952e16432ed503e921c

on August 10, 2012
at 08:32 AM

oh btw my cholesterol is in normal range.. except that my HDL is super high! ;)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 19, 2011
at 03:21 PM

To minimize Oxidation they should be as little cooked as possible. Hard-boiling eggs apparently negates oxidization(through water surrounding the egg and preventing oxygen from getting at the chol. in the egg)? I have been boiling the daily eggs but...I grow weary of this peeling of HB'd eggs. Would it be so bad to fry? At what temp. and time if so?

D1c02d4fc5125a670cf419dbb3e18ba7

on February 19, 2011
at 03:13 PM

Wouldn't you just be better off eating the yolks raw and cooking the whites?

A1a4882d31414600b2cab395a5b17161

(699)

on May 08, 2010
at 09:51 PM

Perhaps true, but cholesterol is much higher in eggs than many other products. Still trying to find out whether if this is something to worry about.

A1a4882d31414600b2cab395a5b17161

(699)

on May 08, 2010
at 09:50 PM

This definitely seems to be the issue. Thanks!

A1a4882d31414600b2cab395a5b17161

(699)

on May 08, 2010
at 09:50 PM

Very helpful, thank you.

A1a4882d31414600b2cab395a5b17161

(699)

on May 08, 2010
at 06:04 PM

I found this but it had to do with omegas, not cholesterol: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/cooking-omegas/

1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on May 08, 2010
at 08:25 AM

Because that's where the yolks/fats are, and leaving them uncooked means no/little oxidization.

A1a4882d31414600b2cab395a5b17161

(699)

on May 08, 2010
at 04:14 AM

Why is cooking eggs with the yolk intact better?

A1a4882d31414600b2cab395a5b17161

(699)

on May 08, 2010
at 04:14 AM

Are you then saying that this is in fact a problem to be concerned about?

  • A1a4882d31414600b2cab395a5b17161

    asked by

    (699)
  • Views
    27.3K
  • Last Activity
    1408D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

20 Answers

8
100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on May 08, 2010
at 07:09 PM

Eades says: * think we???ve kind of created a monster with the scrambled eggs bit. If you scramble them lightly you won???t produce that much oxidized cholesterol. I would just go ahead and scramble them (as long as they???re not like rubber when you get through) rather than doing the whole thing with the blender.

When I wrote about this in the PPLP, I was still a little on board with the lipid hypothesis of heart disease. Now that I???ve gotten past that, I???m not so worried about a little oxidized cholesterol. Ideally it would be better to eat eggs soft boiled, but that???s not always practical, so I say go for a light scramble and don???t stress about it. Even as a purist.*

From this blog entry in the comments

A1a4882d31414600b2cab395a5b17161

(699)

on May 08, 2010
at 09:50 PM

Very helpful, thank you.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on October 25, 2012
at 02:48 PM

What they mean is cook scrambled eggs lightly -- not necessarily the mixing part. However, over-mixing the eggs removes texture.

5
1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on May 08, 2010
at 08:35 AM

There's still quite a bit of argument regarding whether consuming oxidised fats/cholesterol has any ill effects; much like the AGE argument, scientists aren't sure whether the dangers found IN the body are due to the same substances coming in through diet, or whether they are manufactured for other reasons. One of the main causes of oxidization of cholesterol in the body is consumption of rancid, refined oils, especially when they have been exposed to heat. These oils cause the formation of free radicals in the body, leading to cholesterol oxidisztion.

Whilst the science sorts it all out, I tend to stick to fried eggs with runny yolks when I want eggs, but if I want to do a scramble, I go for it, leaving the addition of the eggs until any other ingredients are cooked.

A1a4882d31414600b2cab395a5b17161

(699)

on May 08, 2010
at 09:50 PM

This definitely seems to be the issue. Thanks!

2
5db563a5c94e73644be798fd16101cb8

on May 09, 2010
at 02:42 PM

Already some good answers, so I would just add a tip for scrambling eggs so that they're not exposed to heat for very long.

Heat up the pan for about five minutes, until it gets quite hot. Add the butter, ghee or coconut oil and wait about 20 seconds. Then pour the eggs in the pan. If you do it this way, it will literally take less than 15-20 seconds to cook the eggs.

D1c02d4fc5125a670cf419dbb3e18ba7

on February 19, 2011
at 03:13 PM

Wouldn't you just be better off eating the yolks raw and cooking the whites?

2
431274eafd914ee34d9c57262c1f617a

on May 08, 2010
at 03:01 AM

I read heard the same thing, many times, but I'm not sure it's the cholesterol as much as the fats....polyunsaturated. Scrambling isn't bad, but cooking eggs with the yolk intact is better. Fried eggs without breaking the yolk, boiling or poaching is definitely better. And if you do scramble them, do so with lower heat.

A1a4882d31414600b2cab395a5b17161

(699)

on May 08, 2010
at 04:14 AM

Why is cooking eggs with the yolk intact better?

1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on May 08, 2010
at 08:25 AM

Because that's where the yolks/fats are, and leaving them uncooked means no/little oxidization.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 19, 2011
at 03:21 PM

To minimize Oxidation they should be as little cooked as possible. Hard-boiling eggs apparently negates oxidization(through water surrounding the egg and preventing oxygen from getting at the chol. in the egg)? I have been boiling the daily eggs but...I grow weary of this peeling of HB'd eggs. Would it be so bad to fry? At what temp. and time if so?

2
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 08, 2010
at 02:29 AM

If that were true, cooking almost any animal product should result in oxidized cholesterol. I think the cooking time/heat level would make a big difference too. I mean if you like to scramble your eggs to the point of near blackness, sure.. but, regardless, that statement doesn't seem consistent with the healthy outcomes from eating a "cooked" Paleo diet.

A1a4882d31414600b2cab395a5b17161

(699)

on May 08, 2010
at 09:51 PM

Perhaps true, but cholesterol is much higher in eggs than many other products. Still trying to find out whether if this is something to worry about.

1
Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on August 10, 2012
at 03:49 PM

I remember reading a while back that it is actually powdered/dried egg that becomes oxidized. This is usually what buffets and many other "restaurants" or eateries (and especially fast food chains) use when they have to dish out large quantities of scrambled eggs. Ever notice how a lot of the buffet style eggs look/feel much different than when you scramble them yourself at home? It's because they are in a big bucket or big bag and they pour it onto the griddle to cook em. They are processed. I think this is the kind of scrambled eggs that might have some oxidized cholesterol.

But still, as some of the other answers here mention, it is not yet fully known if that is even all that bad in the first place.

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on December 30, 2012
at 09:34 PM

Those eggs are laced with citric acid to inhibit bacterial growth.

1
C16f43595a71c952e16432ed503e921c

on August 10, 2012
at 08:31 AM

Awesome news!.. Scrambled eggs are really... OK to EAT! ALTHOUGH!!! the eggs DO contain LDL 'Bad cholesterol' when oxidized. Meaning if you break the yolk and 'oops' cook it.. hehe The LDL particles that produce in your body are too LARGE! to enter into the arteries of the heart. Studies show that the 'Large' LDL particles will not 'fit' or attach to the arterial wall causing plaque to build up.. So eating egg yolks, broke or not broken, cooked or raw, is perfectly fine to eat! I have 4 eggs every morning before my workout. with some muesli. i usually separate the yolk and drink it raw and cook the white with some bell peppers. :)

*At least this is what i understood from the article I read. Check it out! http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/7301

C16f43595a71c952e16432ed503e921c

on August 10, 2012
at 08:32 AM

oh btw my cholesterol is in normal range.. except that my HDL is super high! ;)

1
92456474e203748a630974941837cf97

on May 08, 2010
at 02:29 AM

its the oils overheating it, so try lightly cooking... avoid problem by broiling in water or poaching in water

A1a4882d31414600b2cab395a5b17161

(699)

on May 08, 2010
at 04:14 AM

Are you then saying that this is in fact a problem to be concerned about?

0
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on July 28, 2013
at 11:11 PM

What about omelet? The scrambling is done while they are raw and cold, not in the pan.

0
Dba4686e589eb5ce6bb2d69a9a0036c7

on July 28, 2013
at 11:08 PM

Are they bad? Who really knows? Go to - http://carbsaner.blogspot.com/ and join the movement to stop CarbSane - arguably the greatest threat to the Paleo world in existence.

0
879cbf384e3dbb17dc7df2ff904849ce

on July 28, 2013
at 11:04 PM

Very interesting... I eat eggs regularly, and scrambled just happens to be my favourite. My thoughts are that unless you are consuming massive amounts, you have nothing to worry about.

0
7ba72b6aae770a6b7fbe70c9e80224e8

on May 06, 2013
at 07:52 PM

If this is the lowest hanging fruit on your wellness hit list it might be better to stop reading the internet and go for a walk.

The link between dietary cholesterol and blood cholesterol is pretty darn thin.... And more importantly the link between blood cholesterol and the how long you are going to survive with and/or without high cholesterol is even thinner.

Statins have made billions in profit but after becoming just about the most prescribed drugs in history they haven't been shown to provide significant extensions to lifespan. (oopsy).

There are definitely some common factors in metabolic syndrome that should be treated but it's not clear after a huge essentially free trial of statins in the public domain that blood cholesterol is one of them.

Arteriosclerosis appears to be caused by damage to the walls of the arteries and build up of scarring in many cases rather than "plaque buildup" commonly stated.

So in summary dietary cholesterol <> blood cholesterol <> going to die earlier.

It's going to even more crushing when it turns out bacon is the best pork product for the money and saturated fats turn out to be healthy when consumed in appropriate amounts.

I'll take mine with a splash of frank's hot sauce.

0
4e60b1c01595b1eb1834f162b9aaac11

(0)

on May 06, 2013
at 02:13 PM

Anyone interested in braised eggs? Theyre really easy, and allow for minimal use of fat and heat, which makes sense all around. I spray a moderately heated pan very lightly and add the egg whole. After it forms a little, add a few drops of water (hot if speed is a factor), cover and allow to reach desired point of doneness. If your pan has a heavy bottom that holds residual heat, you can now turn off your gas or coil. The cooked egg is beautiful, the edges never brown and get tough, and you don't lose any of nutritious white that usually occurs when poaching. As water-estimating skill grows, you'll end up with no extra liquid to pour off at the end--meaning no nutrition going down the drain. Hope someone else enjoys!

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 06, 2013
at 04:49 PM

"nutritious white"? Egg white is pretty much the least nutritious part of the egg!

0
77188106a9c27a22ad47d0ef7318de7a

(922)

on December 30, 2012
at 07:39 PM

Just fry your eggs in a liberal amount of coconut oil and put a clear lid on them, cooking them for no more than 2 minutes on medium high heat. Once the white is solid they're ready to eat. Keep the yolks intact and leave them runny. Better to be safe than sorry.

0
Bdf2cffb9e9cb9e63213302e73499bff

on December 30, 2012
at 07:33 PM

Thanks for the info people. I am going to add a extension to the question.

What about for Babies? Does anyone know?
You cant give then uncooked egg yolk and everyone I know who is my age or older ate scrambled eggs when they were little.

My mother-in-law, who read one article about scrambled eggs being the worst way to cook eggs, will only poach eggs for my daughter. Which isn't bad but then she freaks out when I give her hard boiled eggs.

0
64d332a238c252d9993889e0c7c3f5c2

on October 25, 2012
at 02:44 PM

I wouldn't know/ I couldn't know, so, I'll eat what I like, when I like, and how I like. Some religions/life styles take the authoritative role in proscribing certain foods, e.g. pork or meat of any kind, but even their adherents die sooner or later of the same things everyone else succumbs to, like heart attacks and cancer, or poor nutrition. Stop being OCD about this stuff and enjoy food will ya?

0
68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on August 10, 2012
at 12:57 PM

Eggs, in any form > Oatmeal, bread, cereal, concentrated fruit juice.

However, once you make the change to adopting the eggs, scrambling is not the ideal way to prepare them.

0
6b1b839cf2b0335717a8a1b33674e248

(144)

on May 08, 2010
at 06:46 PM

This is a problem, per the Eades, Bowden, etc. I think it's a continuum. Boiled is best, but the worst is scrambled from a breakfast buffet that have had time to be completely oxidized. As with all things, variation is the key. Scrambled every day probably not a good idea, or at least not the BEST idea.

0
4a1512c822f4698855f126e16236668a

(116)

on May 08, 2010
at 02:33 PM

Scrambling will leave a portion of the fat cholesterol oxidized. Why not soft or hard boil your eggs, mash em up with melted butter. End up almost like scrambled... If you do scramble, fry at low temperature some oregano or rosemary in butter first for a few minutes and then add the eggs to that mixture. The heat will bring out some of the essential oils of the herbs which are potent, heat-resistant fat soluble antioxidants. This will substatnially reduce the oxi-cholesterol.

0
2ec677eb4c04e1d0248db99945f9d604

(20)

on May 08, 2010
at 01:42 PM

Go and check out marksdailyapple.com - He has a post pertaining to this. Basically, don't worry about it.

A1a4882d31414600b2cab395a5b17161

(699)

on May 08, 2010
at 06:04 PM

I found this but it had to do with omegas, not cholesterol: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/cooking-omegas/

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!