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Question about vegetable tolerance

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 27, 2012 at 7:01 PM

I am a vegetable evangelist: I grew up eating fast food (literally five nights a week) and I didn't eat vegetables at all until a college boyfriend showed me that they weren't so bad when prepared correctly. Since then I've done a lot of dietary experimentation, and one conclusion has always emerged: eating lots of vegetables makes me feel awesome. So, naturally, I try to persuade my loved ones to eat plenty of veg so they, too, can unlock the power.

I know there are people who say they don't "tolerate" vegetables, but I've always dismissed that as a foot-stamping excuse from overgrown children who don't want to eat their carrots. After all, if a child raised on McDonald's (that would be me) can learn to love kale, what's stopping everyone else?

I had an experience recently that is making me reconsider my position. I was giving my "eat more veg!" spiel to a friend and she mentioned that zucchini seems to give her problems and maybe broccoli too. After I climbed down off my soapbox, I had to admit that maybe she has a legitimate issue with vegetables. So now I'm wondering: how do different people do on different amounts of vegetables? I've always assumed that everyone functions best with plenty of plant matter, but maybe that's as arrogant as the hardline paleos and vegans who are convinced that their diet is the best for everyone.

Anyone want to weigh in?

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on September 28, 2012
at 04:31 AM

For me nightshades have no negative effect on GI stuff that I can notice, but I notice a significant difference in how my joints feel when I cut out nightshades.

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3 Answers

1
4e248f471963a491dcf7eb75d6ff187e

on September 27, 2012
at 08:17 PM

I've noticed issues with nightshades for myself (tomato, eggplant, pepper & spiced derived from). My symptoms are gastrointestinal.

I have a friend who is allergic to certain vegetable skin... potato, apple, carrot. Her lips, tongue and throat swell. Less when cooked but she still has to be careful.

Another friend is allergic to all raw vegetables... yes, ALL raw vegetables. Her symptoms are all over the map.

At least a few friends of mine have gastro symptoms from onion, both raw and cooked.

My conclusion is that everyone has their own sensitivities and intolerances, even if they don't line up with mine or the most common. And not everyone will LIKE food they don't react to. Telling people how to eat (or exercise) won't change them, they have to be ready to change. That was the case for me!

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on September 28, 2012
at 04:31 AM

For me nightshades have no negative effect on GI stuff that I can notice, but I notice a significant difference in how my joints feel when I cut out nightshades.

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 27, 2012
at 07:10 PM

My wife is allergic to all raw fruits and most of the vegetables (its called OAS). The only ones she can handle seem to be nightshades. and to cook the allergen out you basically have to make mush -- which makes vegetables intolerable for me. So sauce/ purees we can agree upon, other than that she doesn't get veggies.

The symptoms of OAS can be very mild or pretty severe. I always thought of my wife as one of those "overgown children", but when her reactions went from mild to severe (i.e. throat swelling trip to hospital) we got her tested, and sure enough she has OAS. The allergist suggested that many people have OAS, but itchy, uncomfortable throat issues or blotchy skin might go undetected (as they had with my wife) while subconsciously they develop aversions.

0
23c8aef5287e3e5d331ea4d1cf3a30f6

on September 27, 2012
at 11:54 PM

I have problems with raw veggies and fruit. I eat some raw veggies and fruit, but generally things like fresh spinach and other leafy greens, or low fiber fruits like bananas and grapes, and then still in moderation. I have IBS and my belly does not like a lot of raw! That being said, COOKED veggies and fruits are typically not a problem. Baked pears and bacon is one of my favorite snacks. I'm kind of a veggie evangelist too, lol- although I try to respect that people's bodies are different and react different ways.

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