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Perfect Health Diet for Lifters

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 15, 2013 at 8:32 PM

Okay, so I've been looking into The Perfect Health Diet. What's really concerning for me here is the low protein amount, especially for someone who lifts heavy. Conventional wisdom, which can be wrong in a great number of cases, is that you need .7-1 gram of protein for every body pound if you're trying to get stronger. PHD has only .5-1 lb of meat overall each day. I don't see how one could possibly strength train and get stronger with such a low amount of protein.

Thoughts? Comments?

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on August 17, 2013
at 08:23 PM

Furthermore, I even gave a personal example, that while I tend to follow PHD, I myself eat beyond the suggested amounts *since my own caloric and metabolic expenditures are higher than the average person's.* Next time, actually read what someone has to say before calling their statements irresponsible -- especially if you think you disagree with them -- as you may be jumping to conclusions, like this time.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on August 17, 2013
at 08:20 PM

You can feel that way, but you'd be wrong. My bias is towards whole foods, that is for certain, as I get between 120-250g of protein a day from non-processed foods only, i.e. no supplemental protein. There is absolutely no scientific basis of benefits, additively from protein, when in excess of approximately 150g for the largest, normally sized bodies. Considering my post explicitly states that increased metabolic expenditures require more nutrition *overall*, means you must have found it more important to call someone's statement "irresponsible" from a soapbox, instead of actually reading.

9f52f85c3964445d7b16c94a890f6136

on August 17, 2013
at 04:39 PM

I feel it is irresponsible to say that. You are, at least in my opinion using a biased and unscientific analysis of protein intake, mainly to justify the whole foods approach.You are not taking into account a few key things: varying intensity levels of athletes varying lean boss mass requiring vastly lower or larger amounts varying testosterone and protein synthesis levels in humans, some people have a better ability to synthesize protein than I would if I took a cycle of anavar. Those people can utilize up to 300g of protein a day easily people on steroids can utilize insane amounts

9f52f85c3964445d7b16c94a890f6136

on August 15, 2013
at 10:38 PM

1 gram per pound of LBM, not body weight.

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2 Answers

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C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on August 15, 2013
at 08:51 PM

PHD has good general recommendations but many of them must be adapted to the individual person. I personally eat an average of at least a pound of meat per day along with some eggs, lots of veggies, butter, coconut oil, coffee heavy cream and occasionally some fruit and nuts. I also am very active, and a competition lifter, yet my main hobby is rock climbing. I probably average 150-200g carbs per day and at least that much protein per day, but I don't count macros. I just eat real foods when I am hungry until I am full. Muscles are built by providing the proper stimulus, rest and adequate nutrition. If you don't feel you are recovering well after workouts, rest more, and eat more protein and carbs. But allow your body to be fat adapted so you can spare glycogen for all but the most intense exercises and that fat will provide the majority of your energy.

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Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on August 15, 2013
at 10:03 PM

I feel the PHD estimates are spot on for the most part, even for lifting. There's an explanation, though.

The PHD estimates are for average, normal healthy bodies. .5-1lb of meat delivers much more than adequate protein, especially if you are eating from whole-food, quality sources. I eat about 1.25 to 1.5 lbs a day, and that yields 150 to 200 grams of protein. Coupled with the amounts of quality, whole food sourced carbohydrate dense foods PHD recommends, and I think that's a pretty darn good nutritional supply of macronutrients for olympic lifting and/or heavy bodybuilding type activities with weights.

Someone increasing both their caloric and metabolic expenditures beyond what is normal or average will simply need to consume more food for complete nutrition.

For an average person, 1lb of quality, whole-food meat is going to deliver 120-150g of protein easily. This is (arguably) the threshold for where protein benefit v. cost starts to push over into more costly than beneficial -- even for bodybuilders and/or lifters.

9f52f85c3964445d7b16c94a890f6136

on August 17, 2013
at 04:39 PM

I feel it is irresponsible to say that. You are, at least in my opinion using a biased and unscientific analysis of protein intake, mainly to justify the whole foods approach.You are not taking into account a few key things: varying intensity levels of athletes varying lean boss mass requiring vastly lower or larger amounts varying testosterone and protein synthesis levels in humans, some people have a better ability to synthesize protein than I would if I took a cycle of anavar. Those people can utilize up to 300g of protein a day easily people on steroids can utilize insane amounts

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on August 17, 2013
at 08:23 PM

Furthermore, I even gave a personal example, that while I tend to follow PHD, I myself eat beyond the suggested amounts *since my own caloric and metabolic expenditures are higher than the average person's.* Next time, actually read what someone has to say before calling their statements irresponsible -- especially if you think you disagree with them -- as you may be jumping to conclusions, like this time.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on August 17, 2013
at 08:20 PM

You can feel that way, but you'd be wrong. My bias is towards whole foods, that is for certain, as I get between 120-250g of protein a day from non-processed foods only, i.e. no supplemental protein. There is absolutely no scientific basis of benefits, additively from protein, when in excess of approximately 150g for the largest, normally sized bodies. Considering my post explicitly states that increased metabolic expenditures require more nutrition *overall*, means you must have found it more important to call someone's statement "irresponsible" from a soapbox, instead of actually reading.

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