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Is saturated fat beneficial for inflammation?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 06, 2010 at 3:09 PM

Can someone point me toward some studies or info on whether sat fats like coconut oil and butter are beneficial for people who have inflammation (high C-reactive protein levels.) and are at risk for CVD? It seems as though there are two schools of thought: One says that sat fat should be limited until inflammation is reduced by a low-carb diet and fish oil, etc., the other says that sat fat helps reduce it. Thank you.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on March 07, 2010
at 02:31 AM

Hi Suzan, you don't say whether you have any other CVD risk factors, such as blood pressure, weight, stress, hi triglycerides, lo HDL, etc. If so, the CRP should come down as you attend to your other risk factors. If CRP is your only risk factor, then it could be a leftover from your prior lifestyle, and it should come down gradually. The following may help if you're not doing them already: fish oil, niacin, interval training, and vitamin C supplements ( http://qualitycounts.com/fpcreactive%20protein.htm )

Be4b60059db3511771303de1613ecb67

(1137)

on March 06, 2010
at 10:40 PM

Are you eating a lot of saturated fat? I've been strict Paleo for a month, and the CRP was still pretty high. Wondering if I can do better with the diet regarding good fats.

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3 Answers

3
6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on March 06, 2010
at 05:10 PM

Hi Suzan, I don't know how many schools of thought there are, but saturated fat is at worst harmless with respect to CVD. Dr. Eades has an archive on the subject here: http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/category/saturated-fat/ . The main benefit of saturated fat, in my view, is the substitution factor. We're substituting pro-inflammatory calories with sat fat calories, which are, at worst, non-inflammatory (but not necessarily anti-inflammatory). A conventional diet is loaded with pro-inflammatory "foods" such as sucrose, fructose, grains, hydrogenated oils, and omega-6 vegetable oils. If you cut those out, your calories have to come from somewhere. Why not sat fats?

1
03aeff8d87a3b53a449b5b8e9158da98

(3268)

on March 06, 2010
at 10:24 PM

For what its worth, I've been paleo for a few months, and had my blood work done last week. My c-reactive protein was .45!

Be4b60059db3511771303de1613ecb67

(1137)

on March 06, 2010
at 10:40 PM

Are you eating a lot of saturated fat? I've been strict Paleo for a month, and the CRP was still pretty high. Wondering if I can do better with the diet regarding good fats.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on March 07, 2010
at 02:31 AM

Hi Suzan, you don't say whether you have any other CVD risk factors, such as blood pressure, weight, stress, hi triglycerides, lo HDL, etc. If so, the CRP should come down as you attend to your other risk factors. If CRP is your only risk factor, then it could be a leftover from your prior lifestyle, and it should come down gradually. The following may help if you're not doing them already: fish oil, niacin, interval training, and vitamin C supplements ( http://qualitycounts.com/fpcreactive%20protein.htm )

1
93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on March 06, 2010
at 06:04 PM

Hi Suzan,

This is really a non-answer to your question -- but from my anecdotal experience, by increasing my saturated fat intake dramatically, I saw facial inflammation subside radically and essentially disappear.

My face is more symmetrical, and I look 10 years younger. Again, this is an admittedly, purely anecdotal interpretation of my experience.

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