8

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Intermittent Fasting

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 11, 2010 at 9:19 AM

What is the best way to do intermittent fasting?

1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on June 16, 2010
at 07:00 AM

I do something very similar, except I eat dinner Sunday night then go to lunch Tuesday. It seems to cover up any bad things I ate over the weekend

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on March 06, 2010
at 11:41 PM

Dr McGuff, Body by Science, would have you rest 7 days after a very high intensity workout to give the body time to recover. He reports amazing results training people. Have to fight the urge to do something every day because everyone thinks more training is better for met-con and strength. He counsels length of recovery time is as important the actual workout. Sounds like your body is telling you to eat-eat-eat due to the 5x a week routine. If you back off a little, IF will be a breeze for you and your insulin spikes will be minimized.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on March 05, 2010
at 03:59 PM

Maybe go easier on the CF met-cons.

F5652c7726ee903e9f55945bdf377d06

(90)

on March 04, 2010
at 03:15 PM

This is exactly how I do it and it works great.

6caf68654a886fa5772faa78149d2907

(0)

on February 17, 2010
at 08:47 PM

I also do a 2-meal day, which is where I use the randomization. It's always on the weekend, but I switch days or very occasionally do both days.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 12, 2010
at 08:32 PM

I agree on the randomization point. I also eat one meal per day, but I give myself a 2-meal day on Saturdays (mainly because I have more access to food when at home)

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16 Answers

best answer

14
4310630972b25b6ed4fbd0fe7a7201d0

on February 12, 2010
at 08:09 PM

The best way to do intermittent fasting (IF) is whatever way works for you. Everyone is different and intermittent fasting, by definition, is not a rigid plan.

Personally, it works best for me to fast 19 - 22 hours per day and just eat one large meal per day.

My wife, however, can't go that long between meals and will eat two smaller meals per day at random times: some days she'll eat breakfast and a late lunch, other days she'll eat brunch and dinner, etc.

Other individuals I know will feast well for a day and then go without food for 24 or 48 hours and then repeat the process.

The best option may, in fact, be a melding of all three options with some randomization involved.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 12, 2010
at 08:32 PM

I agree on the randomization point. I also eat one meal per day, but I give myself a 2-meal day on Saturdays (mainly because I have more access to food when at home)

6caf68654a886fa5772faa78149d2907

(0)

on February 17, 2010
at 08:47 PM

I also do a 2-meal day, which is where I use the randomization. It's always on the weekend, but I switch days or very occasionally do both days.

14
Fa47fe5368e66325865f60a928609145

(961)

on February 12, 2010
at 10:00 PM

For me IF is just convenience. Don't feel like cooking today? Then don't. Forgot to pack lunch? No sweat. Want to sleep another half hour or so? Skip breakfast. Very convenient indeed. Never actually plan to do it.

4
6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on February 14, 2010
at 04:24 PM

I'm just starting IF. Right now, I always incorporate sleep time in my fast. That gives me a 7 or 8 hour "head start." If I skip breakfast, I'm already up to 16 to 18 hours of fasting. If I ever go beyond 24 hr., I'll include 2 nites of sleep time in my fast.

3
0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on March 06, 2010
at 11:13 PM

IF works best with a dash of chaos. Avoid repeated patterns of eating and non-eating. Fest and famine were not menu items to choose from but to live around. The best feature of IF, besides improved health, is the freedom from living to eat on the clock. Missing a meal is healthy. Learn to fill your body with nothing to eat.

2
954dbd7efe0e7653e8efd377d7776d38

(457)

on March 07, 2010
at 05:45 AM

I eat dinner Saturday night and fast until Monday morning. Sunday is my lazy day, so it works out perfect for me. I always read the benefits from fasting came from 24-40 hour windows.

1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on June 16, 2010
at 07:00 AM

I do something very similar, except I eat dinner Sunday night then go to lunch Tuesday. It seems to cover up any bad things I ate over the weekend

2
08f65e31fe63fa8c91edcdf8ece35607

on March 04, 2010
at 01:18 PM

I tried IF for about 6 weeks and didn't really have much success with it. I used a condensed eating window (4-8 hours, depending on the day but usually on the lower end of that). I am already relatively lean (8%-10% BF) and very active (CrossFit MetCons 5x per week with some additional strength work). I noticed that I didn't recover as well as when I was eating several smaller meals per day and that my performance improved, but not as quickly as it had before. I also noticed some undesirable changes in body comp (seem to have gotten a little chubbier) - though that's just from looking in the mirror so I can't be 100% certain that it's the case.

Has anyone had a similar experience? I'm pretty sold on the logic of IF, but I think I am going to try the "just eat foods that don't trigger an insulin response whenever you're hungry" method. Any other suggestions?

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on March 05, 2010
at 03:59 PM

Maybe go easier on the CF met-cons.

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on March 06, 2010
at 11:41 PM

Dr McGuff, Body by Science, would have you rest 7 days after a very high intensity workout to give the body time to recover. He reports amazing results training people. Have to fight the urge to do something every day because everyone thinks more training is better for met-con and strength. He counsels length of recovery time is as important the actual workout. Sounds like your body is telling you to eat-eat-eat due to the 5x a week routine. If you back off a little, IF will be a breeze for you and your insulin spikes will be minimized.

2
52cae90a114ca8f0404948e2b7ccb7ef

(1595)

on March 03, 2010
at 05:20 PM

My IF story is this: I started a 9-5 job last year (boo!) and being away from my paleo kitchen, I decided not to eat while at work. I drink a few coffees with cream during the early part of the day, but only eat solid food between 6-11pm each weekday. Often a large meal first, then a smaller one towards bed. On the weekends, I relax this and eat breakfast anytime between after noon, and feel free to eat as much as I like until bedtime. The longer fasting time each day is nearly effortless for me, which I really enjoy. I do not weigh or measure any of my food.

2
4dc97234de5ef4ebe77c78323d527bd0

(183)

on March 03, 2010
at 07:32 AM

Two simple and effective regimes are:

1) Daily fast (eat only during a 4-5 hour window every day, aka "Fast 5", related "The Warrior Diet") 2) Alternate-day fasting: alternate days of "don't eat before dinner" and "don't eat after dinner", which gets you about a 23-hour fast (dinner to dinner) every other day.

You can also do 500-800 cals every other day, but that requires calorie counting, I don't like that. I worry about daily fasting being a strain on the adrenals, so I do alternate-day. But I like daily fasting or semi-fasting (eat 0-200 cals before dinner every day) and find it pretty easy.

2
38423c557821a68c4f17435203769016

(20)

on February 16, 2010
at 04:52 AM

I've never cared a lot for breakfast so I skip it during the week. On weekends I usually have breakfast, but fairly late in the morning. This is my version of IF.

F5652c7726ee903e9f55945bdf377d06

(90)

on March 04, 2010
at 03:15 PM

This is exactly how I do it and it works great.

2
F3db8010a167c553de9fe8bfdfe45142

on February 16, 2010
at 01:32 AM

I prefer to do a large breakfast of eggs and/or meat and broccoli, and then skip lunch and dinner that day. Sometimes I do this several days in a row.

I drink a lot of fluids, mostly teeccino, all day, so I stay well hydrated.

It was hard at first, but I persevered, and now I hardly get hungry at all. If I do, coconut oil kills the hunger, and stops sugar bingeing.

Now I'm much more in tune with what real hunger is, for intermittently fasting. It feels good.

I don't worry about it much, and if a nice dinner invitation turns up, I feel free to accept it, staying Paleo of course. It works out well that way.

2
48a1334b345df12f6291e9f1edf54693

on February 12, 2010
at 09:28 PM

My fasting approach would have to be consider more of a regimented fasting than intermittent. I do a carbohydrate re-feed every Friday followed by a 24-32 hour fast every Saturday. I understand that there are a variety of physiological benefits but for me the psychological benefits are the most valuable. I NEVER allowed myself to get hungry in the past. I would eat whenever I wasn't full anymore and the result was a bodyweight of 387.5 LBS. Fasting has helped me to identify what true hunger is vs. simply craving food. Understanding hunger has allowed me to lose 30+ LBS in less than 7 weeks so far.

Go ahead, give it a try!

1
9b5915c8b6490bccc432bbf76710b4d0

on November 30, 2010
at 04:30 PM

I have done no breakfast for one year now, working hard to avoid grains for the last 9 months. Total weight loss 50 lbs. Greatest loss was when I went to 4-5 hour window and passed on lunch. Weight loss slowed or maintained as I went to a 8-9 hour eating window. I have gained muscle, former football player, 6'1" and now 230 lbs.

1
4dc97234de5ef4ebe77c78323d527bd0

(183)

on March 03, 2010
at 07:32 AM

Two simple and effective regimes are:

1) Daily fast (eat only during a 4-5 hour window every day, aka "Fast 5", related "The Warrior Diet") 2) Alternate-day fasting: alternate days of "don't eat before dinner" and "don't eat after dinner", which gets you about a 23-hour fast (dinner to dinner) every other day.

You can also do 500-800 cals every other day, but that requires calorie counting, I don't like that. I worry about daily fasting being a strain on the adrenals, so I do alternate-day. But I like daily fasting or semi-fasting (eat 0-200 cals before dinner every day) and find it pretty easy.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 18, 2011
at 06:06 AM

New to all this so I'm also reading all the posts on intermittent fasting to find out what it is and isn't. However, I've conducted some experiments to see how it feels to fast. These experiments are not planned, but I note when I stop eating the night before and the next morning if all goes well and I feel fine I will skip breakfast. If energy levels continue high I consider delaying lunch until 2 or 3pm. That usually makes my fasting experiments anywhere from 15-18 hours. I was always a breakfast skipper and eat a lot of fat for dinner, so this seems like the easier way to go. Sometime soon, I plan to try eating breakfast, a late lunch and no dinner, but that will be harder if I'm home around all my food:)

0
Cacc89096bbbec20ff6904cbbd58e92d

(273)

on October 13, 2010
at 12:07 PM

I am an avid cross trainer/lifter, and have had great success with fasting occasionally after intense training sessions. I've noticed that when I feel up to it, not eating after a night training session ends until midday next day has given me faster muscle recovery times, alleviated soreness I would encounter otherwise, and generally made me feel sharper. I would not recommend fasting like this too much, as it depends on how long you have trained for before your fast, and many other factors relating to your personal constitution, but believe that intermittent fasting in this manner can be beneficial and stimulating for many athletes. There is information by Robb Wolf on fasting after strength training that supports this too.

0
F38f19b6ec74b2c6bf49531fe5dae567

on March 04, 2010
at 08:16 PM

I only do 16 hour fasts two times a week. Not as extreme as most people, but IF isn't conducive to my goal gaining muscle.

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