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Ideal Body Aesthetics: Are you after this, and what are your methods?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 19, 2012 at 10:00 PM

So..

Are there any of you on here that either do or do not follow a Paleo diet that are seeking to create the ideal body aesthetic?

Do you do this with any changes to your current diet? Are there any methods of exercise that you employ, and why or why or not? Have you seen changes? Are there other methods of diet that you tweak (Say, tweaking the paleo diet) to control your aesthetic as well? Are there certain forms of exercise you participate in to get there? (Crossfit, Bodybuilding/Strength Training, Power Yoga, Running.. etc?)

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on August 18, 2014
at 09:38 AM

While flexibility is important, avoiding sarcopenia as we age is vital. The only way to do this is to get big and muscular before we reach our 50s and to keep that muscle before we reach our 70s. Take a look at this and other of Art's articles, the more muscle you have the less likely you are to die:

http://www.artdevanyonline.com/1/post/2013/05/effe...

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on April 20, 2012
at 06:09 PM

I really enjoyed the article!

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on April 20, 2012
at 03:14 PM

Yes, I've read the 80% number a few places, and I generally agree. If I take a few minutes here and there to get a few pull ups, push ups, squats and a few really heavy lifts (I like picking up and tossing big rocks!) here and there, while eating flawlessly - body comp seems to fall right into place, with no real hours spent on working out.

1dcfcebc5f36408d121f124a78292d42

(1295)

on April 20, 2012
at 02:41 PM

I agree with Jenny J and Jen. Why are aesthetics so important to you? I think often times we believe that we will finally be happy when our bodies look a certain way, but this is rarely the case. Body obsession becomes a coping mechanism for the painful experiences in our lives. Check out Geneen Roth's books. She is very insightful with this topic.

65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on April 20, 2012
at 02:24 PM

If I could +100 this, I would!

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on April 20, 2012
at 01:03 AM

Didn't you ask a similar question: http://paleohacks.com/questions/109080/lean-mean-female-machine#axzz1sXNZUvVY Not that I'm discouraging questions, but maybe something more specific would help this get answered.

C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on April 19, 2012
at 10:51 PM

What about you MenaceDenis?

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 19, 2012
at 10:25 PM

Just noticed your a girl so some tweeks. Do not do bicep or tricep isolation exercises. Do lift heavy in compound movements, do HIIT, and learn to love stiff leg deadlifts and lunges!

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 19, 2012
at 10:24 PM

I just noticed you're a girl, so your bodyfat will naturally be a bit higher than what is still healthy for a guy. As for females, I' d recommend not working your biceps, triceps, etc and mostly just doing compound movements and HIIT. Definitely do lots of stiff leg dead lifts!!

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 19, 2012
at 10:17 PM

For lifts I make compound lifts my focus (dips, deadlifts, squats, pull ups and chin ups), but I aslo add in some accessory work too like lunges, rear delt fly variations, dumbbell rows, and some bi/tri movements as well.

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7 Answers

6
518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on April 20, 2012
at 01:39 PM

This post starts out "For those of you with purely aesthetic goals.." http://everydaypaleo.com/2011/08/05/you-cant-fix-a-body-you-hate/ It's a very good read. I'm not implying that you have purely aesthetics goals, but attitude is huge contributing factor to looking and, most importantly, feeling great. The definition of one person's ideal can be very different from an others.

65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on April 20, 2012
at 02:24 PM

If I could +100 this, I would!

1dcfcebc5f36408d121f124a78292d42

(1295)

on April 20, 2012
at 02:41 PM

I agree with Jenny J and Jen. Why are aesthetics so important to you? I think often times we believe that we will finally be happy when our bodies look a certain way, but this is rarely the case. Body obsession becomes a coping mechanism for the painful experiences in our lives. Check out Geneen Roth's books. She is very insightful with this topic.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on April 20, 2012
at 06:09 PM

I really enjoyed the article!

2
C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on April 19, 2012
at 10:51 PM

At first I was only concerned with getting/feeling well. I won't go into it but I spent the last year just trying to get funtional again. That was phase 1. I've now started phase 2 which is to work on body fat composition to 1) reduce symptoms of endometriosis and all of the other benefits of reduced body fat, and 2) to look good in a bikini.

I have a lot of thick stomach fat which is a sign of some sort of hormonal thing. Not sure what. Anyway, I am now tracking my food and physical activity through SparkPeople and while the scale hasn't budged my pants are looser at the waist and thighs. Tummy is already looking better. It's been two weeks.

My food goals are to hit between 1,200 - 1,550 calories, 20 -60 carbs, 27 - 60 fat, and 60 - 136 grams of protein. These goals are not based on a lot of research (or any?). If anyone has any tweeks for me I wouldn't mind hearing them.

I walk/sprint for a total of 40 minutes twice a week, and once or twice a week I do a series of modified squats and modified push ups to failure. I hope to some day do a real push up. That is a big pie in the sky goal for me. Someday!!

I believe that weight loss is 80% food and 20% working out. Has anyone else found that to be true?

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on April 20, 2012
at 03:14 PM

Yes, I've read the 80% number a few places, and I generally agree. If I take a few minutes here and there to get a few pull ups, push ups, squats and a few really heavy lifts (I like picking up and tossing big rocks!) here and there, while eating flawlessly - body comp seems to fall right into place, with no real hours spent on working out.

1
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on April 19, 2012
at 10:13 PM

I am 90% paleo 100% of the time and have been this way since I was 13 years old. I try to achieve a healthy body as well as an aesthetically pleasing one, because I think taht they tend go hand in hand.

Nutrition: I eat a high LEAN protein diet supplemented with healthy MUFA such as olive oil, mixed nuts, and avocado. I eat some fruit (mostly around workouts), and the same goes for starch. I also get some green vegetables in me everyday. Carbs and fats are kept low to moderate most of the time, and I'm a fan of carb cycling.

Exercise: I engage in strength training 4-6 days per week, HIIT 3-5 times a week (intervals outside or on the treadmill, mostly), and some LISS every now and again (stair mill). I try to throw in intense bodyweight circuits (like the INsanity workout DVDs) a couple times a week too. Oh, and I do core exercises daily. I don't stretch as often as I should, but I'm still fairly flexible.

Other: I try my best to minimize stress and maintain a healthy social life and balance in all areas. I exercise hard but not forever. I eat excellent 90% of the time. I do my homework. I go out and have fun, etc.

I think paleo is a great start to want to improve your health, but to really develop a very aesthetic look takes a lot of hard work and some will power that may take some getting used to.
Think of the it as a restricted paleo diet, so a good multivitamin is a must. I hope this adds to your arsenal.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 19, 2012
at 10:24 PM

I just noticed you're a girl, so your bodyfat will naturally be a bit higher than what is still healthy for a guy. As for females, I' d recommend not working your biceps, triceps, etc and mostly just doing compound movements and HIIT. Definitely do lots of stiff leg dead lifts!!

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 19, 2012
at 10:25 PM

Just noticed your a girl so some tweeks. Do not do bicep or tricep isolation exercises. Do lift heavy in compound movements, do HIIT, and learn to love stiff leg deadlifts and lunges!

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 19, 2012
at 10:17 PM

For lifts I make compound lifts my focus (dips, deadlifts, squats, pull ups and chin ups), but I aslo add in some accessory work too like lunges, rear delt fly variations, dumbbell rows, and some bi/tri movements as well.

0
D60a80530f85e7098df551d8ddb86c20

on August 18, 2014
at 07:11 AM

For long time my ideal was to be big and muscular but the older I get I realized how important it actually is to stay flexible and in a rather athletic shape. You just feel better and your body is more functional and aesthetic. After 8 years of bodybuilding I started to follow my girlfriend's Yoga routine each morning, getting slowly a better flexibility, body awareness, and balance :) (Ah, for your reference, we're doing Kris Fondane's Yoga routine from Juli's blog: sugarfreejuli.com/yoga4all ) I I felt so clumsy and stiff in the beginning!!

Food wise we're eating paleo for almost 2 years now - the best decision ever!

Tim

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on August 18, 2014
at 09:38 AM

While flexibility is important, avoiding sarcopenia as we age is vital. The only way to do this is to get big and muscular before we reach our 50s and to keep that muscle before we reach our 70s. Take a look at this and other of Art's articles, the more muscle you have the less likely you are to die:

http://www.artdevanyonline.com/1/post/2013/05/effe...

0
70d82ba6d7dc1503d954cf0c82ab80f4

on August 18, 2014
at 04:03 AM

I think it depends on your definition of the ideal body aesthetic. For me, I personally want a maintain low body weight and low fat percentage. I'm not looking to be muscular or carry any extra weight.

That means food wise, I stay away from all dairy and paleo sweeteners like honey and maple syrup, and I limit high-calorie foods like nut butters, nuts, coconuts, avocados, fats and oils, and high carb/sugar paleo foods like coconut water, fruit juice, dried fruit, and plain fruit. Keeping track of my caloric and macro intake has opened my eyes to the portion control required when eating at such high nutrient/calorie density. Vegetables are your friend. I've found personally that I don't require as much protein as is often recommended. I'm not actively trying to build muscle. Certain cuts of meat are very high calorie, eggs are a great alternative. Limit salt to only what is really necessary, too much can cause bloating.

Exercise wise, I have been strict paleo for about a year, and have seen considerable benefits to my build since joining a fitness studio about 6 weeks ago that offers 1-hour barre and sculpt classes that I find very challenging. After going about 3-6 times per week I have seen significant flattening of stomach, longer looking arms, pointier shoulders, higher butt, etc. I'm also able to have more wiggle-room in my diet and be less afraid of carbs like sweet potatoes.

0
71a423ae0f5b58da3bcc768b54f89724

on August 15, 2014
at 01:44 AM

Hi, MeepsisWellfed. I'm Courtney from Memphis. I am certified as a personal trainer and group exercise instructor, and while I do not have any legitimate nutrition credentials (only exercise/gym-related), I can give my informal personal standpoint. I agree that consistently eating a nutritious diet that is conducive to your particular goals is definitely at least equally important as is consistent personalized exercise. That being said, I think it is important to make sure you don't allow yourself to undervalue exercise by making it less of a priority than your eating habits or neglecting your training here and there. I'm very glad you value your eating habits, but I do think you could benefit greatly from a slightly more strenuous exercise regime. Don't do too much too soon, but strength training (your squats and push-ups, etc) every other day will be much more effective and bring greater progress than just once or twice a week. You should consider hiring a personal trainer to show you some different exercise routines, and what I do with my clients is email them the workouts we've done and when they feel comfortable they can try to do them sometimes on their own (once their form is correct that it!). I hope that helps!

0
C326acd0ae246a39c5685f2ba72e3136

on April 19, 2012
at 10:13 PM

My idea of ideal body aesthetics is a functional body but a lean muscular one. I think a low body fat, a v-shaped back, strong defined delts, shapely calves and legs are all very aesthetic. I focus mainly on weighted dips for a defined chest,triceps and delts. I do Weighted chins for the back and biceps. Squats and deadlifts for a strong core and legs. I throw in a small bit of ab work and push-ups. I found zero-carb makes me look the best. I retain the smallest amount of water and it makes my muscles appear more ripped. Not inflated and puffy like those who down carbs and salt constantly.

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