1

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how to season a cast iron skillet

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 14, 2013 at 9:25 PM

Possible Duplicate:
How to season/maintain a cast-iron skillet?

1.do I have to use a vegetable oil to season my cast iron skillet? will using olive oil or butter suffice? any specific recommendations for any healthy oils I can use?

  1. different websites and youtube videos have similar yet distinct instructions on how to "season" the pan, can you give me a step by step instructions on how you season yours? thanks..

  2. how often do i have to season it ?

E687b5eb51456c9a0205aff406f44ca3

on July 17, 2013
at 12:19 AM

i usually just smear it around with my (clean) hands, just enough to coat the entire surface, and then use whatever's left on my hands as "moisturizer," though i guess you could spread the oil with a paper towel instead...

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on July 15, 2013
at 04:31 PM

Not very well!!

5f6d15c9dd935b6fed3623caf984c14e

(439)

on July 14, 2013
at 09:49 PM

thank you. when you say you "coat with a layer of oil" are you saying you just put coconut oil over the pan and just smear it and then dry it with a paper towel?

5f6d15c9dd935b6fed3623caf984c14e

(439)

on July 14, 2013
at 09:46 PM

seriously bitch. I Did.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on July 14, 2013
at 09:38 PM

Seriously dude. Use the search feature. http://paleohacks.com/questions/5031/how-to-season-maintain-a-cast-iron-skillet#axzz2Z3fizXAx

  • 5f6d15c9dd935b6fed3623caf984c14e

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7 Answers

2
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on July 14, 2013
at 10:52 PM

In short, you want PUFAs. PUFAs polymerize and give you the non-stick coating you're looking for. Flax and sesame oils are great. Olive oil or bacon fat works in a pinch. Coconut oil and tallow? Not so much. You could do any PUFA-laden oil (corn, vegetable, canola) because in reality there's nearly no oil on the surface once cured and the amount that leeches into food is even smaller.

1
618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on July 14, 2013
at 10:37 PM

Use the SEARCH BAR - there is at least one big thread on this on Paleohacks - with lots of very useful info on it

0
Ac1be7d044a82c85cee039f3435a550f

(150)

on July 15, 2013
at 04:19 PM

My method tends to be very paper-towel intensive... When I bought mine (a 10-inch), I did an initial seasoning session. Preheat oven, coat thinly using paper towels, pop it in for 1/2hr. Once you remove it, coat another layer, then put it in for another hr. Repeat 5-6 times. This isn't really enough to get it really smooth but at least it builds a base.

I don't use it for much now except to fry bacon, and I do all my seasoning using lard (I render my own). After cooking, I will boil some water and use it hot to rinse out any food bits left over. I also bought a soft-bristled brush that I use for light scraping if anything gets stuck. Of course, if there's no food bits then I just pour out the oil and wipe the skillet. Immediately after I dry it with paper towels, pop on the stove on low heat for a few mintues to make sure it's entirely dry, then coat another light layer of oil and leave it to cool before keeping.

Looking forward to the day when I can fry eggs in my skillet without anything sticking...

0
Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

(3700)

on July 15, 2013
at 01:20 AM

Lard

Every time after you use it, until it's so seasoned that you don't need to.

In the early stages, use salt as an abrasive to get bits of food off before seasoning.

0
4610451431ec7155c87a5698be682a95

(1122)

on July 15, 2013
at 12:50 AM

Once you season it you don't have to re-season it, unless something unfortunate happens like soap and water washing. If I were seasoning a new pan I would use a high smoke point oil, coat the skillet and throw it in a HOT grill or even an open fire.

0
E687b5eb51456c9a0205aff406f44ca3

on July 14, 2013
at 09:43 PM

I use coconut oil. Olive Oil would not be ideal as it is not suitable for high temperatures. I also would not use butter due to the milk solids (though clarified butter would probably be fine).

I usually season it by covering the cooking surface with a generous layer of coconut oil and then putting it upside down in the oven at 350 degrees F for an hour (with a tray or baking dish below to catch the oil).

After this I avoid cleaning it as much as possible. If only oil is left in the pan after cooking I just leave it. If there is more food residue I will clean with water and a brush (never use soap unless it is to clean before re-seasoning), dry, and then coat with a layer of oil. It only needs to be re-seasoned if the coating of oil has been removed by soap or excessive scraping.

hope that helps!

5f6d15c9dd935b6fed3623caf984c14e

(439)

on July 14, 2013
at 09:49 PM

thank you. when you say you "coat with a layer of oil" are you saying you just put coconut oil over the pan and just smear it and then dry it with a paper towel?

E687b5eb51456c9a0205aff406f44ca3

on July 17, 2013
at 12:19 AM

i usually just smear it around with my (clean) hands, just enough to coat the entire surface, and then use whatever's left on my hands as "moisturizer," though i guess you could spread the oil with a paper towel instead...

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