1

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How Much Exercise Needed for 1-1.5 Grams of Protein per Day?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 21, 2011 at 8:50 PM

I've read over and over again that when eating paleo, consuming 1-1.5 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight is best for building muscle, but how much working out does this rule require? I do crossfit three time a week, and usually another cardio/strength training workout somewhere in there. I weigh 170, so based on that information, should I be eating at least 170 grams of protein a day? Do I require less on days that I don't workout? I've heard that the answer is no because your muscles are still repairing themselves in the days after a workout, but I have also heard many people say they adjust their protein intake based on whether they worked out that day or not. Thanks in advance for your help!

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on July 23, 2011
at 03:59 AM

Protein is super important so I eat in the 0.9-1.0 g/lb lean body mass. However I do not obsess over it. I only use the pancreas information as a possible prevention method and it keeps me from going overboard on protein. However going low to low on protein would be very bad indeed...

D1c02d4fc5125a670cf419dbb3e18ba7

on July 22, 2011
at 06:43 PM

@Mark - What is your carb intake? This will impact your protein intake requirements

40449b985898b088a64660b40f329f0f

(951)

on July 22, 2011
at 06:31 PM

To answer your question, I am 27 and just trying to get into better shape through diet and exercise. And thanks for the link!

40449b985898b088a64660b40f329f0f

(951)

on July 22, 2011
at 06:29 PM

To answer your question, I am 27 and just trying to get into better shape through diet and exercise.

40449b985898b088a64660b40f329f0f

(951)

on July 22, 2011
at 06:27 PM

Very good, Peter!

40449b985898b088a64660b40f329f0f

(951)

on July 22, 2011
at 06:27 PM

Yea, when I was writing the question, I realized that it was not a question about the Paleo diet, but it seems to be one of those things that gets discussed in the context of the Paleo diet.

D1c02d4fc5125a670cf419dbb3e18ba7

on July 22, 2011
at 03:16 PM

Perhaps here's my point - the issue of protein intake is related to but separate from the adherence to a Paleo compliant diet - meaning toxin free. When people say they have "read it" numerous times, I would be curious to see the source of such information. I'm not disputing it at all, but I am just pointing out the fact that this is not a Paleo question per se. I did however post a link in my response that might be of interest. Cheers!

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on July 22, 2011
at 01:12 PM

I don't get it?

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on July 22, 2011
at 01:11 PM

Dr. Gonzalez's first book, The Trophoblast and the Origins of Cancer, co-authored with Dr. Linda Isaacs, discusses, from the perspective of contemporary molecular biology, the pioneering research of Dr. John Beard, who 100 years ago first suggested an anti-cancer effect for pancreatic enzymes. This monograph, available through New Spring Press, provides a scientific rationale for the efficacy of the enzyme treatment, and includes case reports from our own practice.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on July 22, 2011
at 01:11 PM

In 1902, James Beard, a Scottish physician, suggested that pancreatic enzymes might control and kill cancer cells. Later, William Kelley, a dentist, further developed Dr. Beard’s ideas and published the results of his own practice. Impressed by these findings, Dr. Gonzalez began working closely with Dr. Kelley. The Gonzalez regimen combines the work of Dr. Gonzalez and Dr. Kelley with the theories and practice of Dr. Max Gerson. Dr. Gerson also treated cancer with diet and nutritional supplements.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on July 22, 2011
at 01:08 PM

Dr. Gonzalez's first book, The Trophoblast and the Origins of Cancer, co-authored with Dr. Linda Isaacs, discusses, from the perspective of contemporary molecular biology, the pioneering research of Dr. John Beard, who 100 years ago first suggested an anti-cancer effect for pancreatic enzymes. This monograph, available through New Spring Press, provides a scientific rationale for the efficacy of the enzyme treatment, and includes case reports from our own practice.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on July 22, 2011
at 01:06 PM

In 1902, James Beard, a Scottish physician, suggested that pancreatic enzymes might control and kill cancer cells. Later, William Kelley, a dentist, further developed Dr. Beard’s ideas and published the results of his own practice. Impressed by these findings, Dr. Gonzalez began working closely with Dr. Kelley. The Gonzalez regimen combines the work of Dr. Gonzalez and Dr. Kelley with the theories and practice of Dr. Max Gerson. Dr. Gerson also treated cancer with diet and nutritional supplements.

332d9f75d1077abafff6887681f6b130

(1081)

on July 22, 2011
at 11:44 AM

Eric, do you have a source on the pancreatic enzymes fighting cancer? Ive never heard of that and would like to read more into it.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on July 22, 2011
at 03:07 AM

That's funny Peter ;)

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on July 22, 2011
at 02:52 AM

Jeff, people who adjust their protein daily already have a hobby - Daily protein adjustment.

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on July 22, 2011
at 02:51 AM

I have read it here numerous times

D1c02d4fc5125a670cf419dbb3e18ba7

on July 22, 2011
at 01:06 AM

I don't know about any ADA recommendation. Regardless, I think the #s are meaningless without context. If he is LC/VLC, then the protein intake needs to consider gluconeogenesis. Moreover, I don't know if he is an aspiring athlete, a mid-lifer trying to get in shape, or what the objective is. Regardless, my opinion is that most people overestimate their protein requirements with respect to athletics. But you know what they say about opinions :-)

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on July 22, 2011
at 12:41 AM

the traditional ADA recommendations might be 1g/kg, but I believe athletes do generally go with the g/lb of body weight. I personally find that to be a sweet spot. I weigh around 150lbs and eat around 150 g of protein most days

40449b985898b088a64660b40f329f0f

(951)

on July 21, 2011
at 10:42 PM

I have seen it here once or twice, but more so on body building websites in the context of building lean muscle. Whenever I ask someone at the gym or at crossfit, that is generally what they tell me.

40449b985898b088a64660b40f329f0f

(951)

on July 21, 2011
at 10:40 PM

Thanks very much, Jeff. I sometimes worry that I am not eating enough, so I end up having two protein shakes a day to get it all in, which is what prompted me to write the question. The dairy in the whey protein is where I cheat, and I didn't know if I was going overboard unnecessarily.

D1c02d4fc5125a670cf419dbb3e18ba7

on July 21, 2011
at 09:56 PM

Where have you read this over and over again?

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on July 21, 2011
at 09:44 PM

That doesn't really address his question.

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5 Answers

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2
D1c02d4fc5125a670cf419dbb3e18ba7

on July 22, 2011
at 12:25 AM

The 1.0 g/lb figure is typically from body building circles. The fact that there are a lot X-fitters that evolved from there might have given you the impression this is what you "need" when eating paleo.

I would read this article - http://perfecthealthdiet.com/?p=2712. Keep in mind the numbers given are per kg of bodyweight, not lb.

Also regarding macronutrient cycling and timing, I am a skeptic. If your objective is health, I think it is a waste of time. If you objective is performance, then maybe it is relevant. YMMV.

My olympic dreams are over so I just eat when I'm hungry and try to avoid the toxins as much as I can - workout day or otherwise. Good luck!

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on July 22, 2011
at 12:41 AM

the traditional ADA recommendations might be 1g/kg, but I believe athletes do generally go with the g/lb of body weight. I personally find that to be a sweet spot. I weigh around 150lbs and eat around 150 g of protein most days

D1c02d4fc5125a670cf419dbb3e18ba7

on July 22, 2011
at 01:06 AM

I don't know about any ADA recommendation. Regardless, I think the #s are meaningless without context. If he is LC/VLC, then the protein intake needs to consider gluconeogenesis. Moreover, I don't know if he is an aspiring athlete, a mid-lifer trying to get in shape, or what the objective is. Regardless, my opinion is that most people overestimate their protein requirements with respect to athletics. But you know what they say about opinions :-)

D1c02d4fc5125a670cf419dbb3e18ba7

on July 22, 2011
at 06:43 PM

@Mark - What is your carb intake? This will impact your protein intake requirements

40449b985898b088a64660b40f329f0f

(951)

on July 22, 2011
at 06:29 PM

To answer your question, I am 27 and just trying to get into better shape through diet and exercise.

40449b985898b088a64660b40f329f0f

(951)

on July 22, 2011
at 06:31 PM

To answer your question, I am 27 and just trying to get into better shape through diet and exercise. And thanks for the link!

3
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on July 21, 2011
at 09:48 PM

If you're eating a good amount (meaning enough to feel satiated) of protein at every meal then you shouldn't really need to worry about a magic number of 170 grams. On some days you'll naturally eat more and some days less. In my opinion people who adjust, down to the gram, the amount of protein ingested on workout vs non-workout days probably need to find a hobby.

If you're eating a solid, clean paleo-based diet, and don't have any serious metabolic/insulin/leptin issues, your body will probably tell you the right amount to eat and you may find that it varies on workout and non workout days. But you shouldn't need to count the grams other than as a matter of interest.

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on July 22, 2011
at 02:52 AM

Jeff, people who adjust their protein daily already have a hobby - Daily protein adjustment.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on July 22, 2011
at 03:07 AM

That's funny Peter ;)

40449b985898b088a64660b40f329f0f

(951)

on July 21, 2011
at 10:40 PM

Thanks very much, Jeff. I sometimes worry that I am not eating enough, so I end up having two protein shakes a day to get it all in, which is what prompted me to write the question. The dairy in the whey protein is where I cheat, and I didn't know if I was going overboard unnecessarily.

40449b985898b088a64660b40f329f0f

(951)

on July 22, 2011
at 06:27 PM

Very good, Peter!

0
E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on July 22, 2011
at 11:43 AM

Are you trying to gain? If not it doesn't really matter, anywhere around .5g/lb of bodyweight is adequate to maintain muscle and recover right in my experience.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on July 22, 2011
at 01:06 PM

In 1902, James Beard, a Scottish physician, suggested that pancreatic enzymes might control and kill cancer cells. Later, William Kelley, a dentist, further developed Dr. Beard’s ideas and published the results of his own practice. Impressed by these findings, Dr. Gonzalez began working closely with Dr. Kelley. The Gonzalez regimen combines the work of Dr. Gonzalez and Dr. Kelley with the theories and practice of Dr. Max Gerson. Dr. Gerson also treated cancer with diet and nutritional supplements.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on July 22, 2011
at 01:12 PM

I don't get it?

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on July 22, 2011
at 01:08 PM

Dr. Gonzalez's first book, The Trophoblast and the Origins of Cancer, co-authored with Dr. Linda Isaacs, discusses, from the perspective of contemporary molecular biology, the pioneering research of Dr. John Beard, who 100 years ago first suggested an anti-cancer effect for pancreatic enzymes. This monograph, available through New Spring Press, provides a scientific rationale for the efficacy of the enzyme treatment, and includes case reports from our own practice.

0
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on July 22, 2011
at 05:55 AM

1.5 grams/lb is for the first 4-6 weeks of an intensive weight lifting program. Deadlifts, Squats and Bench Press. After that 1.0 grams/lb. These are all per pound of lean body mass.

More normal is 0.7 to 1.0 grams/lb.

Your body can handle more protein but it is not optimal as the pancreas enzymes will be used more and when used less there is some evidence that unused pancreatic enzymes are used in fighting and warding off cancer...

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on July 22, 2011
at 01:11 PM

In 1902, James Beard, a Scottish physician, suggested that pancreatic enzymes might control and kill cancer cells. Later, William Kelley, a dentist, further developed Dr. Beard’s ideas and published the results of his own practice. Impressed by these findings, Dr. Gonzalez began working closely with Dr. Kelley. The Gonzalez regimen combines the work of Dr. Gonzalez and Dr. Kelley with the theories and practice of Dr. Max Gerson. Dr. Gerson also treated cancer with diet and nutritional supplements.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on July 22, 2011
at 01:11 PM

Dr. Gonzalez's first book, The Trophoblast and the Origins of Cancer, co-authored with Dr. Linda Isaacs, discusses, from the perspective of contemporary molecular biology, the pioneering research of Dr. John Beard, who 100 years ago first suggested an anti-cancer effect for pancreatic enzymes. This monograph, available through New Spring Press, provides a scientific rationale for the efficacy of the enzyme treatment, and includes case reports from our own practice.

332d9f75d1077abafff6887681f6b130

(1081)

on July 22, 2011
at 11:44 AM

Eric, do you have a source on the pancreatic enzymes fighting cancer? Ive never heard of that and would like to read more into it.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on July 23, 2011
at 03:59 AM

Protein is super important so I eat in the 0.9-1.0 g/lb lean body mass. However I do not obsess over it. I only use the pancreas information as a possible prevention method and it keeps me from going overboard on protein. However going low to low on protein would be very bad indeed...

0
1586db0f16b2cef51ee4e71ab08ad1a2

(965)

on July 21, 2011
at 09:31 PM

Lift heavy things for 45 minutes 2-3 times a week, sprint 40m routinely, walk around slowly and relax and read books. Don't sit for extended periods of time.

Doing cardio or anything that pushes your body for more than 45 or so minutes promotes the release of cortisol, which is then counter productive towards muscle gain. Don't work out as much and take breaks every other days from over exerting the same muscle groups.

Do that and you'll be set. It's really not terribly complicated. Overworking your body will stint muscle growth.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on July 21, 2011
at 09:44 PM

That doesn't really address his question.

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