3

votes

foods and mind/brain disease

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 09, 2012 at 11:30 PM

Hi everyone paleo friends! today we know how much the food counts on our diet , and how much the food can determinate a part of our life!

It has been discovered as gluten is connected by schozophrenia and as , terrible "diseases" as the autism can be cured with some strong diet.

I was wondering , in my opinion all the mind disease as serial killer or rapist are caused by something which is wrong in our brain , I don't think that a person born bad , I dont believe in bad person.. what do you think about?

Can exist a correlation between mind and food?

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 11, 2012
at 06:45 PM

Hey thank you Jamie.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 11, 2012
at 06:43 PM

Very interesting. Thanks

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 11, 2012
at 03:30 AM

I watched a documentary about a severely schizophrenic girl (which would fall right into the GAPS spectrum of disorders) and something interesting I noticed during the documentary is that when the parents asked her what she wanted she replied "mac & cheese" and a "muffin." There definitely is something to the theory that pathogenic bacteria/fungi cause cravings for foods that feed their growth.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 11, 2012
at 03:27 AM

I've seen some evidence and read anecdotal evidence that ASD may more so be an issue of a yeast infection of the blood (Donna Gates seems to believe this is what actually causes autistic symptoms.) I imagine if there's gut damage, that will just further exacerbate the problem or let it occur in the first place. Theoretically, all you need is just 1 perforation in the integrity of the GI tract to allow stuff into the bloodstream that shouldn't be there. Something like that would definitely be difficult to detect with a colonoscopy and would not manifest as digestive issues.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 11, 2012
at 02:14 AM

^ choline bitrate that is. Again, if I was using DMAE, or CDP choline, id take less (just using the dosage that people use for cognitive/memeory benefits would most likely work)

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 11, 2012
at 02:11 AM

Oh, and if you use a very biovailable precursor, like DMAE, CDP choline etc, you wont ness need as much as you would from straight choline itself. Although I have heard of dose of 2g-8g bitrate being used initially to raise brain levels in bipolar, I am not sure megadosing on anything is ideal (I tend to be cautious around nutrition). Id probably start with 500mg-1000mg/day perhaps (not forgetting dietary sources tho, you get some from meat and especially eggs)

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 11, 2012
at 02:07 AM

I have heard fish oil associated with mental illness, but usually bipolar etc. I think omega-3 is used in the brain for cognition, so a slight lack execerbates other issues. I dont think omega-3 deficiency itself would present as mental illness, depression or ADHD, but I am no expert on omega-3 in the brain actually. Wasnt mentioned in neuropsych :P. I have heard some find oratate useful.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 11, 2012
at 02:05 AM

To be honest I am not really sure. The adequate intake is set at 550mgs for men, 425mgs for women, but I think to increase brain concenrations from a deficiency, youd need a higher "attack" dosage, and then scale back to a normal dietary amount. Ideally use a salt or other precursor (choline bitrate, DMAE, CDP choline, etc), because lecithin isnt very bioavailable and its usually made from soy oil.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 10, 2012
at 11:31 PM

@VB, Good point on the GAPS. That might be more successful than just a GF/CF diet. I do wonder how many families are able to implement a GAPS diet for a child with ASD given all the smell and texture sensitivies and extreme difficulty with change. Throw in the sibling factor. Yikes. Would be so hard. A young child w/ sibs & really vigilent parents might be able to pull it off. Many kids w ASD are put on a GF/CF diet just bc of the diagnosis, not due to any actual digestive symptoms or skin problems & those are the ones who often have no behavioral/mood/languate changes from the diet changes.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 10, 2012
at 09:11 PM

Jamie what is the recommended dose of Choline (do you mean NAC?) for Bipolar? Lithium Orotate is also good. Fish oil is a joke for depression or ADHD (imo)

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 10, 2012
at 07:55 PM

@BoneBrothFast - what you say makes sense. I look forward to Natasha's next book. On the other hard I think there are many people with ASD with very healthy guts and for whom diet didn't change the severity of their ASD. They may be healthier in other ways, but still have an ASD.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 10, 2012
at 07:29 PM

@VB-while I agree, I actually do not know what tests you are referring to here?? Good point on the GAPS. That might be more successful than just a GF/CF diet - in theory. In practice, I wonder how many families are able to implement a GAPS diet for a child with ASD given all the smell and texture sensitivies and extreme difficulty with change. Throw in the sibling fact. Yikes. Would be so hard. A young child w/ sibs & really vigilent parents might be able to pull it off. Mind you many of the kids w ASD are put on a GF-CF diet just bc of the diagnosis, not due to actual digestive symptoms.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 10, 2012
at 03:22 PM

@Crowlover depending on the severity of the autism, a GFCF diet may be enough. But if you have issues with G and C, you probably have issues with FODMAPs too, so a GFCF diet doesn't remove all culprit foods. @VB Campbell-McBride is working on her 2nd book, which I believe will be released in September. Perhaps along with the new info, we'll get some statistics and info about success rates.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on August 10, 2012
at 07:22 AM

Crowlover, there are things that cannot be diagnosed by tests. I would love to know the success rate of a properly implemented GAPs diet.

46f6b440a524a0af9e24501ae72bea77

(106)

on August 10, 2012
at 02:34 AM

Read "my brain made me do it". But yea, I do play that the foods we eat can cause chemical and physical reactions. So most of the time while we look for physical allergy symptoms we neglect the chemical part hence our brain and our behavior can be altered by foods we may be allergic to (of course I'm talking about conventional eating).

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 10, 2012
at 02:25 AM

Some children/people with autism definitely do improve with a GF and/or CG diet. But not all. Some improve with high dose Vit D too, but not all. I have worked with children with ASD for 25 years and only a very small percentage have a GI link to their autism. The one that do typically have an extremely limited and crappy diet and a lot of overt GI symptoms. Many have no dysbiosis when diagnosed and GF/CF doesn't seem to make any difference. Its always worth trying though and of course there are other benefits to eating healthy besides decreasing the severity of the ASD.

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2 Answers

1
Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 10, 2012
at 08:19 AM

Absolutely, the brain is highly dependant on aminos, minerals and fats of various kinds. How can it be expected to function correctly without its needed components?

Good examples are Choline: treats bipolar, defiencent in 60% of the population. Omega-3: treats a variety of mental issues Deficiency in electrolytes causes psychosis Imbalance of minerals causes illness and mental imbalance. EFAs, trytorphan, tyrosine all essential amino acids which effect mood and cognition, found primarily in various meats.

It goes on and on. I highly suspect that a large proportion of what is diagnosed by psychiatrists is imbalance or deficiency from improper diet. Deficiency itself is only diagnosed when it causes physical symptoms, or shows in an obvious blood test that they happen to choose to do. Imbalance is not really recognised at all, despite plenty about it in the literature.

Psychs and doctors are like the guy with a hammer: All they see is nails.

Autism I am not so sure about. I half wonder if those who take no interest in the social just cant be fully bothered with it. It could also be genetic. Either way, I know next to nothing about it.

Certainly ADHD however is probably at least alot of the time affected by the nutritional. Its frequently misdiagnosed hyperthyroidism. Alot of people have success with altering diet, whether its caused by that or not.

Dont rule out other enviromental conditions. A tight community and empathy and touch are largely absent in modern society. Its those things that breed trust, care and non-violence. Alot of serial killers are highly lonely, or abused, or poorly parented. They probably dont get enough exercise or sunlight either lol!

A person is like a plant. They need water, nutrition, sunlight and more. When they grow wrong, or fail to thrive, its there we should look first .

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 11, 2012
at 02:05 AM

To be honest I am not really sure. The adequate intake is set at 550mgs for men, 425mgs for women, but I think to increase brain concenrations from a deficiency, youd need a higher "attack" dosage, and then scale back to a normal dietary amount. Ideally use a salt or other precursor (choline bitrate, DMAE, CDP choline, etc), because lecithin isnt very bioavailable and its usually made from soy oil.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 11, 2012
at 02:14 AM

^ choline bitrate that is. Again, if I was using DMAE, or CDP choline, id take less (just using the dosage that people use for cognitive/memeory benefits would most likely work)

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 10, 2012
at 09:11 PM

Jamie what is the recommended dose of Choline (do you mean NAC?) for Bipolar? Lithium Orotate is also good. Fish oil is a joke for depression or ADHD (imo)

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 11, 2012
at 02:11 AM

Oh, and if you use a very biovailable precursor, like DMAE, CDP choline etc, you wont ness need as much as you would from straight choline itself. Although I have heard of dose of 2g-8g bitrate being used initially to raise brain levels in bipolar, I am not sure megadosing on anything is ideal (I tend to be cautious around nutrition). Id probably start with 500mg-1000mg/day perhaps (not forgetting dietary sources tho, you get some from meat and especially eggs)

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 11, 2012
at 02:07 AM

I have heard fish oil associated with mental illness, but usually bipolar etc. I think omega-3 is used in the brain for cognition, so a slight lack execerbates other issues. I dont think omega-3 deficiency itself would present as mental illness, depression or ADHD, but I am no expert on omega-3 in the brain actually. Wasnt mentioned in neuropsych :P. I have heard some find oratate useful.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 11, 2012
at 06:45 PM

Hey thank you Jamie.

1
0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

on August 10, 2012
at 01:02 AM

Yes, there is a correlation between the health of your brain and your digestion and diet. People with depression show improvement when supplementing with fish oil or when they add more fish to their diet. The fatty acids found in fish are also found in the brain. If you ever have the chance to eat chilled monkey brain, you may or may not want to take the risk. It tastes and smells a bit fishy.

A GF/CF diet is commonly used by good health-conscious mothers on their autistic children with remarkable improvement.

But the modern medical system and the sheeple bound to it will never understand this link between diet and mental health, so they continue consuming garbage without a care in the world and their mental state deteriorates, along with their health and waistline.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 11, 2012
at 03:30 AM

I watched a documentary about a severely schizophrenic girl (which would fall right into the GAPS spectrum of disorders) and something interesting I noticed during the documentary is that when the parents asked her what she wanted she replied "mac & cheese" and a "muffin." There definitely is something to the theory that pathogenic bacteria/fungi cause cravings for foods that feed their growth.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 10, 2012
at 07:55 PM

@BoneBrothFast - what you say makes sense. I look forward to Natasha's next book. On the other hard I think there are many people with ASD with very healthy guts and for whom diet didn't change the severity of their ASD. They may be healthier in other ways, but still have an ASD.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 10, 2012
at 02:25 AM

Some children/people with autism definitely do improve with a GF and/or CG diet. But not all. Some improve with high dose Vit D too, but not all. I have worked with children with ASD for 25 years and only a very small percentage have a GI link to their autism. The one that do typically have an extremely limited and crappy diet and a lot of overt GI symptoms. Many have no dysbiosis when diagnosed and GF/CF doesn't seem to make any difference. Its always worth trying though and of course there are other benefits to eating healthy besides decreasing the severity of the ASD.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on August 10, 2012
at 07:22 AM

Crowlover, there are things that cannot be diagnosed by tests. I would love to know the success rate of a properly implemented GAPs diet.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 10, 2012
at 11:31 PM

@VB, Good point on the GAPS. That might be more successful than just a GF/CF diet. I do wonder how many families are able to implement a GAPS diet for a child with ASD given all the smell and texture sensitivies and extreme difficulty with change. Throw in the sibling factor. Yikes. Would be so hard. A young child w/ sibs & really vigilent parents might be able to pull it off. Many kids w ASD are put on a GF/CF diet just bc of the diagnosis, not due to any actual digestive symptoms or skin problems & those are the ones who often have no behavioral/mood/languate changes from the diet changes.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 10, 2012
at 03:22 PM

@Crowlover depending on the severity of the autism, a GFCF diet may be enough. But if you have issues with G and C, you probably have issues with FODMAPs too, so a GFCF diet doesn't remove all culprit foods. @VB Campbell-McBride is working on her 2nd book, which I believe will be released in September. Perhaps along with the new info, we'll get some statistics and info about success rates.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 10, 2012
at 07:29 PM

@VB-while I agree, I actually do not know what tests you are referring to here?? Good point on the GAPS. That might be more successful than just a GF/CF diet - in theory. In practice, I wonder how many families are able to implement a GAPS diet for a child with ASD given all the smell and texture sensitivies and extreme difficulty with change. Throw in the sibling fact. Yikes. Would be so hard. A young child w/ sibs & really vigilent parents might be able to pull it off. Mind you many of the kids w ASD are put on a GF-CF diet just bc of the diagnosis, not due to actual digestive symptoms.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 11, 2012
at 06:43 PM

Very interesting. Thanks

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 11, 2012
at 03:27 AM

I've seen some evidence and read anecdotal evidence that ASD may more so be an issue of a yeast infection of the blood (Donna Gates seems to believe this is what actually causes autistic symptoms.) I imagine if there's gut damage, that will just further exacerbate the problem or let it occur in the first place. Theoretically, all you need is just 1 perforation in the integrity of the GI tract to allow stuff into the bloodstream that shouldn't be there. Something like that would definitely be difficult to detect with a colonoscopy and would not manifest as digestive issues.

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