2

votes

Design me a mono-diet

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created February 07, 2011 at 10:33 PM

As much as I know that variety is the spice of life and indeed a good way to 'diversify' one's toxin load, a busy lifestyle and a stretched budget require me to scale back on daily food shopping, particularly vegetable expenditure.

I live in Ireland so vegetables besides potato, onion, leeks, parsnips, carrots, kale, cabbage, broccoli and turnip must be imported from places like Chile and Kenya.

Meat is beef, pork, lamb and chicken mainly. Local fish is wild mackeral and (unfortunately farmed) salmon.

I have access to pastured eggs and take D, C, E, fermented CLO, synthetic K2 and a multivit.

How can I eat a basically monotonous diet that's nutritionally complete? I'm talking 4-5 dishes that I can eat over and over again.

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on February 10, 2011
at 08:20 PM

sarah-ann: I have medium sized slow cooker. Normally add a cup or so of liquid. Experiment with it. Slow cookers are very forgiving. Also, once you make one, you can use the stock from that for the next ;)

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on February 10, 2011
at 06:58 PM

I do go through an insane amount of butter, I buy butter like other people buy milk. Beef is grain finished but 90% grassfed, I wonder is that good enough?

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on February 10, 2011
at 06:57 PM

God, if ONLY that was optimal, would sure make life more straightforward.

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on February 10, 2011
at 06:56 PM

Thanks! That's a comprehensive list! Tell me, do you put the lamb in the slow cooker with any liquid? Or just dry? I have a slow cooker but have had very little success with it.

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on February 09, 2011
at 09:06 PM

Side note since you are in Ireland: Lamb is almost always grass-fed. And Irish butter. It's the BEST along with my fave Guernsey butters.

A0b8c4cc369f93ee987ce15b1bf323fe

on February 09, 2011
at 03:10 PM

Steak and eggs for breakfast & dinner!

  • A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

    asked by

    (4183)
  • Views
    4K
  • Last Activity
    1261D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

11 Answers

7
7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

on February 07, 2011
at 10:54 PM

You can make a myriad of fantastic soups and stews with those ingredients! The best part is you can use cheaper cuts for stews too, because they cook long and slow.

If you need to plan ahead breakfasts, I make the Paleo omelet muffins all the time. You can make a dozen with a dozen eggs and have breakfast for the week. Just add a meat with it (leftovers from dinner, perhaps?) and breakfast is done.

I do prefer making dinner each night fresh and not reheating things, but the stews and soups are wonderful for packable lunches at work.

I would check out the Robb Wolf food matrix for more ideas: http://robbwolf.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/thePaleoSolution_FoodMatrix.pdf Just cross off the stuff you don't have access too, you still see that you have a ton of variables available to you when you mix up different proteins/spices/veggies.

4
5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

on February 08, 2011
at 04:40 AM

Seems pretty simple to me --

Breakfast: 2-4oz cream mixed into cup of tea or coffee

Lunch: 4-6oz 15-20% fat ground meat, seasoned however suits you, over 1/2 cup steamed rice or mashed potatoes

Dinner: Slow braised roasts with any of the root vegetables you listed (save the bones)

Weekends: 4-6 eggs for breakfast; make a stock from all the saved bones plus some dried kelp and make soup for lunch; fish for dinner (or if you prefer, fish on Fridays), liver on Sundays (fish on Friday & liver on Sunday -- amazing how effective our great-grandparents commonsense was)

Probably want to work in some greens a few of those dinners but, I think you get the idea.

4
Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7314)

on February 07, 2011
at 10:54 PM

Those veggies sound perfectly fine to me. It would be really easy to just throw some in the oven and roast them. Kale and cabbage might be better sauteed though.

For meats, I'd stick with mostly beef and lamb. Definitely mackerel over salmon too. Do you like offal? That would definitely help you get nutrients in on the cheap. Bone broth is great for micronutrients too if you can find a cheap source of bones. If you can include these two once in a while, I think you'd definitely have a nutritionally complete diet.

For meals, I'd do meat and then just mix up the veggies as you see fit. Ground beef with onion and kale, steak with a baked potato, mackerel with some roasted broccoli on the side, etc. etc.

2
B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on February 09, 2011
at 10:12 PM

My routine targets the same goals of busy lifestyle and budget (preferring to save money and time for travelling)

A slow cooker (crock pot) is my key tool for making amazing food, while spending very little and not wasting time.

  • Routine
    • Cook lamb (bone-in) in slow cooker (1-2/week cooked overnight or while at work)
    • Reserve liquid. Once cooled you have nutrient rich stock and tallow (fat).
    • Typical breakfast: Fast until mid-day. Used to be eggs with onion, garlic and veg.
    • Typical lunch at work: Leftover meat in it's own stock. With veg. Add fat when the cut off meat is too dry or lean (unlikely with lamb). Sometimes potato with butter.
    • Typical dinner when in a hurry: Leftover meat, eggs (sometimes liver) fried with garlic, onions and veg.
    • Snacks with lunch or dinner:
      • Carrot salad (carrot,vinegar,coconut oil, spices) made 1-2 week
      • P??t?? straight up or using carrots to dip
  • Shopping list in London, UK. Most are easily available in Ireland. (In order of my priority):
    • Lamb roast. Bone-in cuts like shoulder, leg, shank.
    • Eggs
    • Butter (Irish has some of the best. All those green fields to eat up)
    • Garlic (tons!)
    • Red onion
    • Brussel sprouts
    • Broccoli
    • Potatoes
    • Coconut oil (Not required. Can be ordered online in bulk)
    • Lamb liver
    • Carrots
    • P??t?? (mmm. Rich in K2 if that is a concern)
    • Sweet potatoes
    • Spinach
    • Lamb belly/breast (fatty fatty goodness. Equivalent to pork belly)

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on February 10, 2011
at 06:56 PM

Thanks! That's a comprehensive list! Tell me, do you put the lamb in the slow cooker with any liquid? Or just dry? I have a slow cooker but have had very little success with it.

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on February 10, 2011
at 08:20 PM

sarah-ann: I have medium sized slow cooker. Normally add a cup or so of liquid. Experiment with it. Slow cookers are very forgiving. Also, once you make one, you can use the stock from that for the next ;)

2
2193cb1eca1a0eda4b2cad910074634e

on February 07, 2011
at 11:18 PM

Wow! You have a wonderful diet working for you as it stands! AND you have access to local eggs and lamb! I am envious! Shop locally. Can you trade time to help a farmer in exchange for produce? If you don't have time do you have items you can trade for produce? Here in the states we have something called CSA-Community Supported Agriculture. The idea is you buy shares of the produce and every week or so you get a box with your produce.

You mentioned that your time and budget are limited--terrific! Shop in season if possible. In the winter that might pose a challenge however you mentioned several vegetables that winter over nicely. Shop on sale. Eat what you find on sale. If you have a freezer use it to freeze those sale items.

Cooking in bulk and freezing your meals for later is a time saving method. Cooking in large quantities is not only energy efficient for you but also for the environment.

Learn to season your food with herbs and spices. It is amazing how easy it is to change up the flavors by changing the flavors.

What sorts of local wild foods do you have growing that are "free"? Here in the states it is called foreaging or wild crafting. How much more Paleo is that?! Don't look at a field as weeds look at it as lunch!

Count yourself as one of the blessed! Those with to much money seem to spend it foolishly on food they don't need! A limited budget means you need to get the most "nutritional bang for your money!"

Good luck!

1
C2502365891cbcc8af2d1cf1d7b0e9fc

(2437)

on February 09, 2011
at 04:42 AM

Eggs for breakfast, steak for dinner FTW

A0b8c4cc369f93ee987ce15b1bf323fe

on February 09, 2011
at 03:10 PM

Steak and eggs for breakfast & dinner!

1
Medium avatar

on February 08, 2011
at 08:33 PM

My diet is highly monotonous and Irish-friendly. I eat eggs and potatoes or fatty lamb and potatoes for every meal with 2 cups of spinach a day. The eggs and meat are fried at low heat in a cast iron pan with clarified butter and the potatoes are peeled, steamed, mashed, salted and heavily buttered. The spinach is steamed and salted/buttered. I eat some kelp every day and take 5000IU of vitamin D3 and 1-2g of vitamin C.

It's a highly nutritious but also highly satisfying diet.

Good luck.

1
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 07, 2011
at 11:08 PM

I do an almost mono-diet based around lamb and carrot sauerkraut. I always eat these foods every day, though I eat other things too to fill in the gaps. I buy whole lambs (put in chest freezer) and gallon jugs of sauerkraut. Saves money, that's for sure.

1
1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 07, 2011
at 10:55 PM

I don't know if this is going to be helpful or not, but take all those foods that you listed and build your diet around them because they are all good paleo foods. The main thing about paleo (and someone please correct me if I am wrong) is the elimination of grains, dairy, sugars and processed foods. Learn to concoct paleo cassaroles that you can eat for 3 or 4 days running. With a little imagination, you should be able to take the foods you listed as being readily available to you and make lots of good paleo dishes. In fact, I envy you the availability of lamb...I just love it but none of the stores around here carry it.

0
1a641bbff1a7b0a70f08410376bbdf6b

(1587)

on February 09, 2011
at 02:52 PM

Easy! 30 Bananas a day! xD

PS: i'm just joking ;)

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on February 10, 2011
at 06:57 PM

God, if ONLY that was optimal, would sure make life more straightforward.

0
5489f67c05ca5fc68f2b984e48b6da5e

on February 08, 2011
at 10:51 PM

Variety seems to cost more than it's worth. When I eat foods like dairy, nut butters, and chocolate, it doesn't seem to replace or reduce the consumption of my staple meat and vegetables.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!