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Why is jam made with fructose labelled "suitable for diabetics"?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 06, 2013 at 2:33 PM

Sp the rest of my family eat SAD, and my sister is a type 1 diabetic. My mother recently brought home a jar of jam made with fructose for her because it was labelled "suitable for diabetics". Why is this? It was my understanding that fructose, like glucose, raised blood sugar and caused a subsequent insulin response. Is this reckless/irresponsible advertising? I've given up on trying to convince them fructose is bad, they see it as a natural "fruit sugar", and believe glucose is the one to watch.

2edfcc5c8044bbb4f22ba6ea4289f592

(1398)

on May 07, 2013
at 10:47 AM

I haven't, I'm speaking very generally based on the information presented by the American Diabetic Association and the experience of several relatives. Good to hear your experience was positive.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on May 07, 2013
at 01:53 AM

@Janknitz, what amount of fructose do you think is "stress on the liver"? As a species we've been eating fructose for ages, hard to believe that we're killing ourselves now from eating a little fruit or a teaspoon of jelly now and then...

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 07, 2013
at 01:48 AM

Have you had diabetes? My standard doctor correctly diagnosed my problem as overeating high glycemic breakfast cereal, gave me a guide on carb exchange counting, and sent me on my way to fix myself. If he hadn't diagnosed the diabetes I would never have known. Same with severely restricting the carbs. I got thinner and less sick, and in a year all the symptoms were gone. There may be doctors such as you describe but mine was not.

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on May 06, 2013
at 10:03 PM

It may not spike insulin and blood sugar, but that doesn't mean it's healthier, as it can put added stress on the liver. Jams and jellies are cooked down, so there's less fiber to slow the absorption.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 06, 2013
at 08:04 PM

How about "Won't kill you right away"?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 06, 2013
at 05:11 PM

It's the glucose from starches and sucrose that cause the trouble. Fructose eventually gets turned into blood glucose but the effect is delayed and doesn't spike blood sugar the way the others do.

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5 Answers

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4
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on May 06, 2013
at 02:47 PM

Actually, fructose causes a significantly lower insulin and blood sugar spike than glucose so it may, for that reason, be preferable in people with poorly controlled blood sugar. Refined fructose surely doesn't seem optimal, but in diabetics it generally appears healthier than your average SAD diet starchy foods.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2527132

"After 6 months of taking fructose, fasting serum glucose decreased from 12.6 +/- 1.1 (+/- SE) to 9.8 +/- 1.3 mmol l-1 (p less than 0.02), while it was unchanged on normal diet (11.0 +/- 0.1 vs 11.6 +/- 0.9 mmol l-1, NS). Glycosylated haemoglobin was also reduced from 11.3 +/- 0.4 to 9.9 +/- 0.5% (p less than 0.05) on fructose, but unchanged on the control diet (10.4 +/- 0.7 vs 11.2 +/- 0.7%, NS)".

http://www.amjmed.com/article/0002-9343(87)90693-0/abstract

"Thus, this study demonstrates that addition of moderate amounts of fructose as a natural sweetener in the physiologic mixed meal does not appear to have deleterious effects on glycemic control and lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in ambulatory obese patients with type II diabetes and poor metabolic control. Rather, a slight improvement in glycemic control and alterations in the apoprotein compositions in favor of decreased risk for coronary artery disease may occur".

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on May 07, 2013
at 01:53 AM

@Janknitz, what amount of fructose do you think is "stress on the liver"? As a species we've been eating fructose for ages, hard to believe that we're killing ourselves now from eating a little fruit or a teaspoon of jelly now and then...

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on May 06, 2013
at 10:03 PM

It may not spike insulin and blood sugar, but that doesn't mean it's healthier, as it can put added stress on the liver. Jams and jellies are cooked down, so there's less fiber to slow the absorption.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 06, 2013
at 05:11 PM

It's the glucose from starches and sucrose that cause the trouble. Fructose eventually gets turned into blood glucose but the effect is delayed and doesn't spike blood sugar the way the others do.

2
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on May 07, 2013
at 11:04 AM

It's very simple. For the same reason that when I look in the grocery store, I can find a jar of pickles with "Fat Free" on the label. Not that there exists any pickled cucumber that contains fat, but because the manufacturers (again crap in a bottle is a factory product, not a natural food), figured out that people are stupid and easily fooled, and they're willing to put anything they can get away with on the label, or inside the bottle, to make a sale, or worse a repeated sale due to addiction.

Yes, in absolute terms, fructose will not cause an insulin response, so it's true that they are suitable for diabetics in that sense that it's a "low glycemic product", however, the question is, should it be considered suitable to destroy one's liver, just because they're suffering of one disease to help them down on the road to another nasty disease: Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

In an honest world, a steak would carry the label "Suitable for Diabetics."

0
2edfcc5c8044bbb4f22ba6ea4289f592

(1398)

on May 06, 2013
at 11:30 PM

Mscott is spot on with this one. Diabetes is essentially glucose intolerance. Fructose is metabolized differently and does not cause as much of an insulin response. This is why Soda (HFCS) has a lower Glycemic Index than White Bread (pure glucose). That said Fructose is still something which one should limit on a daily basis. It is metabolized primarily by the liver, and chronic overconsumption of fructose wrecks havoc on the body. Also remember, the standard prescription for diabetics is to eat Less fat, More "healthy whole grains" (glucose) and just take insulin sensitizing drugs (metformin) and inject insulin so that they can tolerate the glucose--ie. keep getting fatter and sicker and do nothing to correct the problem. I don't want to start ranting on the treatment of diabetics by standard doctors, but it is downright ridiculous.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 07, 2013
at 01:48 AM

Have you had diabetes? My standard doctor correctly diagnosed my problem as overeating high glycemic breakfast cereal, gave me a guide on carb exchange counting, and sent me on my way to fix myself. If he hadn't diagnosed the diabetes I would never have known. Same with severely restricting the carbs. I got thinner and less sick, and in a year all the symptoms were gone. There may be doctors such as you describe but mine was not.

2edfcc5c8044bbb4f22ba6ea4289f592

(1398)

on May 07, 2013
at 10:47 AM

I haven't, I'm speaking very generally based on the information presented by the American Diabetic Association and the experience of several relatives. Good to hear your experience was positive.

0
04a4f204bc2e589fa30fd31b92944549

(975)

on May 06, 2013
at 08:36 PM

The average persons insistence on believing anything because its written on a food package always amazes me.

0
C5d5cfab77a26fa17a56f2c62b99b879

on May 06, 2013
at 06:52 PM

It's a typo. They mean to say "terrible for diabetics."

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 06, 2013
at 08:04 PM

How about "Won't kill you right away"?

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