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Morning Glucose Readings

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 27, 2012 at 2:22 PM

I am T2 diabetic on 1000 mg Metformin daily. Eliminating refined sugars, all grains, and funky seed oils from my diet has lowered my glucose readings significantly. I am now enjoying numbers below 120 two hours postprandial, which is a first since being diagnosed in Dec 2010. (I never had crazy, out of control numbers that usually lead doctors to a diagnosis. I tested my levels on my own out of curiosity when my sister was diagnosed with gestational diabetes and tracked it for months before contacting my MD.)

What I am having difficulty with is my fasting glucose reading I take upon waking. It ranges anywhere from 117-150. The body releases hormones to prepare the body for the day, causing the liver to release glucose to get energy flowing, and mine seems to be a little too ambitious!

Has anyone had any success lowering their fasting reading?

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on February 16, 2013
at 09:06 PM

Hate IS contagious! You gave me this hatred you fucking bitch! I have not left my house in five years due to negative people. I hoped this forum would be a safe place for me to logically and intelligently connect with people. I was wrong. You ruined it. Not just you, but you have been one of the most abject individuals I have encountered. Thanks.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on July 08, 2012
at 03:06 PM

@mambo I regularly eat 200+ g of high GI carbs per day and have fasting blood sugar in the 80-100 range. However my overall food consumption is not excessive and I maintain a normal weight.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11048)

on July 08, 2012
at 03:56 AM

And what are your credentials? Since my numbers come down once I've eaten, it is the "dawn phenomenon," which I have discussed at length with a knowledgeable professional. I was asking for input from other T2 diabetics that have worked through this issue, not for the tripe you spewed.

5e92edc5a180787a60a252a8232006e9

(345)

on July 08, 2012
at 01:39 AM

A little bit of knowledge can be dangerous.

5e92edc5a180787a60a252a8232006e9

(345)

on July 07, 2012
at 09:33 PM

Look, I read your post. Did you read my post? My point is that elevated morning FBGs like you have should not be interpreted without the context of your overall BG control. Your high morning FBGs may not be strictly due to the "dawn phenomenon", which you assume to be responsible for the phenomenon.

5e92edc5a180787a60a252a8232006e9

(345)

on July 07, 2012
at 09:22 PM

Actually you don't have to be come obese to recreate your T2. Just test yourself on 75g of carbs and see if you have insulin resistance. You probably do and it's your diet and lifestyle that's causing it. Most T2s who fix their diet will test normal BG ... that's not the same as the disappearnce of your insulin resistance, which is considered to be permanent.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11048)

on July 07, 2012
at 03:57 PM

Did you actually read my post? It isn't hard to interpret my fasting glucose levels. I know EXACTLY what is causing it. Thank you for not contributing to the conservation and wasting my time.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on June 30, 2012
at 11:46 PM

@mambo I have little doubt that I could recreate my T2 symptoms if I became obese again. The disturbingly high blood glucose and A1C have been gone for 5 years.

5e92edc5a180787a60a252a8232006e9

(345)

on June 29, 2012
at 02:34 AM

I doubt you cured yourself of t2 diabetes, though. You're testing normal now because of your diet and lifestyle. If you went back to eating SAD, t2 diabetes will more than likely return because insulin resistance does not go away once settled. The clearest designation of T2 diabetes is via OGTT tests. The only exceptions are gastric bypass surgery and massive weight loss upon months of being diagnosed and the dx being at the borderline. Otherwise, diabetes is forever.

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4 Answers

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1
Medium avatar

(10601)

on June 27, 2012
at 05:02 PM

When I was T2 my fasting was at 200 steady, and who knows how long it was at that level before I started testing. Reducing my daily calories to 1500, and restricting the high glycemic carbs (sounds like you're doing that - the worst for me was rice or dry cereal), helped immediately on getting my fasting numbers down. I could still spike post prandial up to 200 though. Getting my weight down helped get rid of the T2 altogether. I've postulated that my big waistline - all that visceral fat packing my organs - was the root of the problem.

5e92edc5a180787a60a252a8232006e9

(345)

on June 29, 2012
at 02:34 AM

I doubt you cured yourself of t2 diabetes, though. You're testing normal now because of your diet and lifestyle. If you went back to eating SAD, t2 diabetes will more than likely return because insulin resistance does not go away once settled. The clearest designation of T2 diabetes is via OGTT tests. The only exceptions are gastric bypass surgery and massive weight loss upon months of being diagnosed and the dx being at the borderline. Otherwise, diabetes is forever.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on June 30, 2012
at 11:46 PM

@mambo I have little doubt that I could recreate my T2 symptoms if I became obese again. The disturbingly high blood glucose and A1C have been gone for 5 years.

5e92edc5a180787a60a252a8232006e9

(345)

on July 07, 2012
at 09:22 PM

Actually you don't have to be come obese to recreate your T2. Just test yourself on 75g of carbs and see if you have insulin resistance. You probably do and it's your diet and lifestyle that's causing it. Most T2s who fix their diet will test normal BG ... that's not the same as the disappearnce of your insulin resistance, which is considered to be permanent.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on July 08, 2012
at 03:06 PM

@mambo I regularly eat 200+ g of high GI carbs per day and have fasting blood sugar in the 80-100 range. However my overall food consumption is not excessive and I maintain a normal weight.

1
7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on June 27, 2012
at 07:52 PM

I've wondered this, too. I am not T2 diabetic, but I have highish morning fasting blood glucose: mid to upper 90s, whereas my postprandial blood glucose is lower mid 80s. I read somewhere that it's an indicator of liver insulin resistance (as opposed to muscle or other tissue insulin resistance). So maybe try some liver support (silymarin from milk thistle) and see if that lowers your morning glucose readings?

0
950efde057e2cc301543059b15f44374

(240)

on December 08, 2012
at 02:48 PM

Cold Thermogenesis a la Dr Jack Kruse style consistently drops my fasting blood blood sugar readings by 10-15 points. I am not diabetic, but I understand many Type 2 diabetics that post on his forum are seeing the same kind of results.

-1
5e92edc5a180787a60a252a8232006e9

(345)

on June 27, 2012
at 08:04 PM

Your fasting #s are too high if they're consistently within that range. But you should always compare your fasting #s to your A1c, so that you know where the spikes are coming from: post prandially or from generally elevated fasting levels, which could be due to many things.

So it's hard to interpret your FBG #s alone without putting them in context with your A1c #s. How good is your overall BG control? Does your FBG reflect your overall BG control? Or is it an anomaly? Depending on your answer, there is literally a binary tree of expalnations about what your elevated FBG could mean.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11048)

on July 07, 2012
at 03:57 PM

Did you actually read my post? It isn't hard to interpret my fasting glucose levels. I know EXACTLY what is causing it. Thank you for not contributing to the conservation and wasting my time.

5e92edc5a180787a60a252a8232006e9

(345)

on July 08, 2012
at 01:39 AM

A little bit of knowledge can be dangerous.

5e92edc5a180787a60a252a8232006e9

(345)

on July 07, 2012
at 09:33 PM

Look, I read your post. Did you read my post? My point is that elevated morning FBGs like you have should not be interpreted without the context of your overall BG control. Your high morning FBGs may not be strictly due to the "dawn phenomenon", which you assume to be responsible for the phenomenon.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11048)

on July 08, 2012
at 03:56 AM

And what are your credentials? Since my numbers come down once I've eaten, it is the "dawn phenomenon," which I have discussed at length with a knowledgeable professional. I was asking for input from other T2 diabetics that have worked through this issue, not for the tripe you spewed.

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