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Fewer meals / day better for Diabetes: Why is this reported as ground-breaking?

Commented on May 18, 2014
Created May 18, 2014 at 1:52 AM

Why is this reported as ground-breaking: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2629883/Two-hearty-meals-day-better-6-snacks-Eating-big-breakfast-lunch-helps-control-weight-blood-sugar-levels.html ?

Anyone who has listened to Lustig ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM ) or read "why we get fat by Taubes ( http://www.amazon.com/Why-We-Get-Fat-About/dp/0307474259/ref=sr_1_1_title_1_pap?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1400377408&sr=1-1&keywords=taubes )

knows that if you are constantly eating carbs, all day long, we are constantly in fat-storage-mode.

So of course: contain carb eating to 6 hours/day instead of 18. Duh?

Why is mainstream just now catching on to this idea?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 18, 2014
at 04:00 PM

I'm more paleo in behavior than diet. Getting the diabetes under control took severe restriction of high glycemic carbs, which is the same as Paleo but which I did using ADA carb counting (on the 3 small meal/3 snack plan). Within a week I had my blood sugar down from 200 to 100 fasting. But this was not the real cure, just a reduction of symptoms. I was still obese, and until I lost 50 lbs I didn't get rid of the underlying insulin resistance.

F0358d32b8c8cf934772e1200a939aa8

(0)

on May 18, 2014
at 02:55 PM

You said you are a former diabetic.. I'm curious if paleo diet contributed to your healing and in what ways.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 18, 2014
at 02:28 PM

The old way of eating was 2-3 meals a day and no snacks. People were forced into eating when hungry rather than when they felt like eating. Today we look for ways to trick leptin and ghrelin, but eating meals on a schedule with fasted gaps works better for controlling overeating.

F0358d32b8c8cf934772e1200a939aa8

(0)

on May 18, 2014
at 11:50 AM

I guess there is a tendency to explore always the same strategy when dealing with a problem, producing more of the same news, then when someone tries something different and proves it to be effective, the scientific community is surprised. Bad science, I'd say. More fond of tradition then of discovering the underlying mechanisms of things.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 18, 2014
at 10:46 AM

This is a combination of an English breakfast with a French dejeuner. People have been doing this for hundreds of years. About as conventional as wisdom gets.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 18, 2014
at 10:39 AM

Sad but true. New ideas = "man bites dog" for the media. Red is the new black, until tomorrow's edition when they can flip their day-old paradigm.

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3 Answers

0
Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 18, 2014
at 10:08 AM

As a former diabetic the short answer is that ADA's strategy of 3 meals/3 snacks was designed to flatten out high blood sugar levels. It works if you're insulin resistant, and you don't overeat.

But for some reason the diet industry made it their mantra for weight loss for people that are insulin sensitive. Unfortunately it encourages continuous grazing, and easily leads to overeating, especially the snacks.

F0358d32b8c8cf934772e1200a939aa8

(0)

on May 18, 2014
at 11:50 AM

I guess there is a tendency to explore always the same strategy when dealing with a problem, producing more of the same news, then when someone tries something different and proves it to be effective, the scientific community is surprised. Bad science, I'd say. More fond of tradition then of discovering the underlying mechanisms of things.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 18, 2014
at 02:28 PM

The old way of eating was 2-3 meals a day and no snacks. People were forced into eating when hungry rather than when they felt like eating. Today we look for ways to trick leptin and ghrelin, but eating meals on a schedule with fasted gaps works better for controlling overeating.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 18, 2014
at 04:00 PM

I'm more paleo in behavior than diet. Getting the diabetes under control took severe restriction of high glycemic carbs, which is the same as Paleo but which I did using ADA carb counting (on the 3 small meal/3 snack plan). Within a week I had my blood sugar down from 200 to 100 fasting. But this was not the real cure, just a reduction of symptoms. I was still obese, and until I lost 50 lbs I didn't get rid of the underlying insulin resistance.

0
F92f0b6a3fe3d45a489e020076904f2f

on May 18, 2014
at 04:11 AM

Dude... I've seen way worse recently, trust me. Reading the New York Times health section (if you want to drive yourself bonkers get a subscription) just in the last 2 weeks they had an "obesity expert" from a prestigious university quoted as saying that insulin has nothing to do with weight gain (wtf!!!!!!). Another article on the increase of type two diabetes among kids had another "expert" wondering out loud why this was going on, citing genetics and the environment... Nothing about sugar or diet.

0
76026e8ef496039d5075440ff731aa0d

on May 18, 2014
at 02:46 AM

Short answer…Your personal knowledge isn't the same as the general populace.

The same news source might next week run an article on how, fat is bad, too much protein will kill you , and why eating broccoli will save your life…

I like this question/ answer - “So basically the absolute and complete opposite of everything we've been told for the last 20 years.” I think this sums up “the regular folks” perfectly…they don’t know what to believe and who to believe it by.

People need more time to digest “new” ideas, while those in the know, support their continued move forward to better understanding of health/ well being.

Truth.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 18, 2014
at 10:39 AM

Sad but true. New ideas = "man bites dog" for the media. Red is the new black, until tomorrow's edition when they can flip their day-old paradigm.

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