17

votes

Would you give up everything?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 14, 2011 at 12:42 PM

Would you give up your career, your life in society, ... if you believe that'd improve your physical and mental health?

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

College sorry for not answering sooner, didn't do a lot. Actually didn't do anything. I still take epsom salt baths but right now my diet is pretty high in magnesium so it's not that important.

97ffbac59e88bdff6495d0a9b6f70ff7

(555)

on April 24, 2012
at 10:53 PM

Korion - just wanted to contact you about another question: any update on how that new form of magnesium is treating you?

4a7a217d8c6a81203a71f9be4a926732

(0)

on March 18, 2012
at 10:46 PM

"Embodied world of impermanence..." Dorado Galore, you sound vaguely Buddhist. Not that there's anything wrong with that! :-)

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on January 29, 2012
at 02:44 PM

nor me, Korion. besides, prmitive living is so much more fun. I love a good challenge.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on January 29, 2012
at 08:15 AM

Exactly my thoughts. I can't stop dreaming about this.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on January 29, 2012
at 03:35 AM

I would upvote this multiple times if I could. If nothing else, Korion, you've asked a very provocative question that I think more people ought to consider.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on January 29, 2012
at 03:32 AM

call me crazy, but I have to agree. Modern society isn't sustainable, and sooner or later it's all going to fall to pieces.

8f46bdba543e1ea2c3818f4b243ff040

(390)

on September 17, 2011
at 08:57 PM

It's definitely a balancing act. It's really rough on my husband, now, as he is our only source of income and, as both doctors, we have a MOUNTAIN of student loan debt to pay back. I guess it just boiled down to a discussion between the 2 of us about what is best for our family. I wouldn't say this is the best choice for everyone.(I'm not gonna lie...it's def easier for me to be at the office doing what I've always loved doing). The way I see it, though, they really are only little once...and I think it's important for them to be with their mom especially. I'll go back when they are in school.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on September 15, 2011
at 07:01 PM

You are most welcome. I adore your positive energy. Please consider joining this pretty cool facebook group - my information is on my profile.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 15, 2011
at 06:59 PM

dear meredith* thank you! also for your kindness

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on September 15, 2011
at 04:19 PM

Oh noooo, thank you OakOy!

66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

(12407)

on September 15, 2011
at 01:49 PM

i wish you the same.

F910318b9aa27b91bcf7881f39b9eabe

(1164)

on September 15, 2011
at 08:21 AM

Yeah, been there, Korion :D

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 14, 2011
at 05:26 PM

I kinda turned the question on it's head, that's all. Sorry. But I do think it's a valid way of answering. Hey, I'm no Adonis, guaranteed to survive. I got here because of severe health problems, which will probably put me in an early grave along with the pudgies. But at least I'm ready.

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on September 14, 2011
at 05:14 PM

+1 Olivia.......

7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on September 14, 2011
at 05:12 PM

Downvoted because you didn't answer Korion's actual question at all anywhere in that screed.

9a0861d7ef021ceb7d81e548f5eac6bd

(30)

on September 14, 2011
at 03:54 PM

Sounds like a dream job! haha

9a0861d7ef021ceb7d81e548f5eac6bd

(30)

on September 14, 2011
at 03:53 PM

I'm scared to make that step. I feel like I worked so hard in college and to get where I am today to stop however I would want to spend every moment with my kids at home. How do you deal with this? I don't have kids yet but we want to in the next year or two.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on September 14, 2011
at 03:24 PM

That would have to be included in the calculation, right? I assume the question was if giving those things up, AND everything that implies would lead to better health. Maybe I'm misreading it.

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15 Answers

14
Fe535c4994ac6176f76e1ff6d29eb08a

on September 14, 2011
at 03:20 PM

I think I see where you are going with this, and yes, I kind of did that.

End of last year I was fat, unhappy, unhealthy, battling gout, acid reflux, allergic type dry skin issues, and depression. I looked back over my life to try to figure out where things went wrong. What I realized was the skid started a few years back when I started a company in the beer industry and my job basically became sitting in bars and having a beer with the owner all day every day. This also meant having lunch at the bar or on the road between accounts, so you can imagine how healthy that was.

That was when I discovered this awesome little thing called paleo that has brought us all here today. I knew I needed wholesale change, no adapting the best I could while keeping my career going, since the career was the problem. So I quit. I shuttered my business, transferred my accounts, gave away most the beer in my fridge (I still have a couple of very choice bottles aging for special occasions) and got healthy. Everyone calls me crazy for giving all that up, but I have never been happier. I now work a normal office job at a standing desk. I eat a homemade salad for lunch. I got a new puppy that I take for walks and runs every day. I dont own a scale, but I would estimate about 40 lbs or so lost. All my health issues have cleared up.

So yes, within reason, I would give it all up, and would do it again.

9a0861d7ef021ceb7d81e548f5eac6bd

(30)

on September 14, 2011
at 03:54 PM

Sounds like a dream job! haha

10
8f46bdba543e1ea2c3818f4b243ff040

on September 14, 2011
at 01:30 PM

I recently gave up my career and basically what I defined myself as to raise my children at home...after my son, who has a severe Congenital Heart Defect, was born. Life is all about making choices...and sometimes one door has to close before another can open. Change is never easy, but it is almost certainly necessary!

9a0861d7ef021ceb7d81e548f5eac6bd

(30)

on September 14, 2011
at 03:53 PM

I'm scared to make that step. I feel like I worked so hard in college and to get where I am today to stop however I would want to spend every moment with my kids at home. How do you deal with this? I don't have kids yet but we want to in the next year or two.

8f46bdba543e1ea2c3818f4b243ff040

(390)

on September 17, 2011
at 08:57 PM

It's definitely a balancing act. It's really rough on my husband, now, as he is our only source of income and, as both doctors, we have a MOUNTAIN of student loan debt to pay back. I guess it just boiled down to a discussion between the 2 of us about what is best for our family. I wouldn't say this is the best choice for everyone.(I'm not gonna lie...it's def easier for me to be at the office doing what I've always loved doing). The way I see it, though, they really are only little once...and I think it's important for them to be with their mom especially. I'll go back when they are in school.

7
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on September 14, 2011
at 12:48 PM

No, if you mean going jobless, which would lead to homelessness and hunger which would lead to poor eating....unless I were independently wealthy and could sustain myself.

I would however make changes to reap the same benefits, but quality of life is also important to physical and mental health...in my opinion.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on September 14, 2011
at 03:24 PM

That would have to be included in the calculation, right? I assume the question was if giving those things up, AND everything that implies would lead to better health. Maybe I'm misreading it.

5
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 15, 2011
at 09:39 AM

actually itried and still try and its challanging. my health is good again. its ambivalent. i got ill and recover. it has to be well prepared. my health improoved also the opposite. now i have a own flat and pay rent.....we re lot people to get selfsufficent.. once up in a time...i wish love nourishment and deep gentle care. thank you all...

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on September 15, 2011
at 04:19 PM

Oh noooo, thank you OakOy!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 15, 2011
at 06:59 PM

dear meredith* thank you! also for your kindness

66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

(12407)

on September 15, 2011
at 01:49 PM

i wish you the same.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on September 15, 2011
at 07:01 PM

You are most welcome. I adore your positive energy. Please consider joining this pretty cool facebook group - my information is on my profile.

4
Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on January 29, 2012
at 03:31 AM

I absolutely would. In fact, a bigger part of me wants to. Right now grad school won't let me, but the more I've pondered it, I've wanted to just go totally off-grid for a while. I think it would be better for my mental health, and likely my physical health too.

The trick for me is going to be getting out of debt and maintaining something of a career while doing this. But I figure I'm young, and I can figure it out more and more in the coming years.

Frankly, I just don't think modern societies were how humans were meant to live. I could go on a massive anarchist anti-technology rant and so forth. Instead, I'll keep up my prject of working toward that goal of living in a cave somewhere, totally self-sufficient.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on January 29, 2012
at 08:15 AM

Exactly my thoughts. I can't stop dreaming about this.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on January 29, 2012
at 02:44 PM

nor me, Korion. besides, prmitive living is so much more fun. I love a good challenge.

4
Medium avatar

on September 14, 2011
at 04:43 PM

If your career and your life in society revolve around crappy lifestyle choices - junky, high-carb convenience food; little or no exercise; continuous cortisol-pumping stress; and, hey, throw in a bit of life-owes-me entitlement thinking - in other words, the life being lived by millions of our fellows here and now - then surely, obviously, clearly: yes. Get a new career and make a new life in society, such that pursuing the two doesn't compromise physical and mental health. To be sure, life will always have its vicissitudes; no life path in this embodied world of impermanence makes health Utopia a real possibility. But surely we can agree that the myriad options for suicide that pass for normalcy in today's world, are precisely that: optional.

4a7a217d8c6a81203a71f9be4a926732

(0)

on March 18, 2012
at 10:46 PM

"Embodied world of impermanence..." Dorado Galore, you sound vaguely Buddhist. Not that there's anything wrong with that! :-)

4
218f4d92627e4289cc81178fce5b4d00

on September 14, 2011
at 01:50 PM

If I could I would. Like Kelly said need a job to maintain a standard of living, but if I won the lottery? or release some brilliant software that rakes in the dough, it would be adios rat race and hello 'Polyface farm' style life. aaahh.........

3
Fe783e04644862c30823614f31b9a996

on September 16, 2011
at 03:51 PM

I'm currently on that path, though with no intention of "leaving society." Rather, I'm aiming for a modest financial independence in the next 24 months, so I can follow my muse, get great sleep, start a family and actually raise the children (rather than outsourcing their education, etc.). I don't regard 9-5 work, whether sedentary or physically challenging, as good for my or anyone's health, so I plan to opt out.

2
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 29, 2012
at 01:48 PM

I haven't had to give up my career, nor social life, nor much else in order to get there. You can adapt and make choices that are better for you, without harming other aspects of your life.

Your true friends will understand, those who don't will see the improvement in your life and either ask you in order to adopt what you've done, if they think it's worth the trade off, or if not to find out what you're doing in order to sabotage you ("have some pizza, it won't hurt you, just once slice", "you're too skinny!", etc.). Those that are supportive are worth keeping around, those that aren't and waste your time, you can toss anyway.

While I don't smoke, the guys around me in the office all do, so I miss most of the office politics and other gossip. But, if there's anything important to learn, they'll make a point to tell me, since we do look out for each others' interests.

In the same way, I bring my own lunch to work, and don't eat with coworkers. When we go drinking, they order beers at happy hour, I order tequila. They think I'm more of a lush, but at the end of the night, they're more drunk than me and have hangovers in the morning while I don't. Some will pick up from my example and learn, others won't. But that's their choice.

Even then, there's enough paleo friendly bar foods, and even in the worst case, buffalo wings will work, so being social isn't impossible, even if it's not the best stuff.

I used to buy everything from supermarkets and Costco, but now, a larger part of grocery shopping is done via Amazon, Northstar Bison, and Tropical Traditions websites. If anything, it's a lot less time consuming to buy something from a website and have it delivered in a couple of days, than to drive a few miles to the supermarket, then drive a shopping cart for an hour between crowded isles of other shoppers. :) And even then, most will have things like coconut milk, kale, yams, cauliflower, etc.

Amazon has subscriptions, which are perfect once you figure out how much of something you use in a month or two. i.e. coconut oil.

The biggest change for most people is having to learn how to cook for themselves instead of buying premade stuff from restaurants. But, I had the advantage of being there many years before going Paleo.

Find out what you're willing to do to bridge your current lifestyle and the one you're aiming for and implement. It's really not that hard.

2
93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 14, 2011
at 05:07 PM

We will all have to give those things up very shortly, within the less than five years. Global production of conventional crude oil has plateaued, and it's set to go into decline. Conventional crude is the big enchilada; every thing else is just the chili sauce on top. Optimists keep citing great developments in bringing more chili sauce online, but that hasn't helped grow the real economy one iota since 2007, and things will get ver bad very fast once the enchilada really starts shrinking.

So, get fit. Lots a pudgy pop'n'fresh people are going to reach the grave a lot sooner than you realize. They will make more room, for survivors, for a while at least. Steel yourself for a return to the natural order of things, nasty in some ways, rewarding in others. Make the best of the rewards. Get your mind around the problem so you'll be ready. Be willing to give up the silly things you mentioned.

7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on September 14, 2011
at 05:12 PM

Downvoted because you didn't answer Korion's actual question at all anywhere in that screed.

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on September 14, 2011
at 05:14 PM

+1 Olivia.......

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 14, 2011
at 05:26 PM

I kinda turned the question on it's head, that's all. Sorry. But I do think it's a valid way of answering. Hey, I'm no Adonis, guaranteed to survive. I got here because of severe health problems, which will probably put me in an early grave along with the pudgies. But at least I'm ready.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on January 29, 2012
at 03:32 AM

call me crazy, but I have to agree. Modern society isn't sustainable, and sooner or later it's all going to fall to pieces.

2
Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 14, 2011
at 01:46 PM

No. I was going to snark a personal motto for a profile a few months back. It occurred to me that I was better off stating what I believe. Life is a commonwealth, and I'm responsible for the needs of others as well as my own. For me, dropping out would be an antisocial and selfish act.

1
78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

on April 11, 2012
at 04:49 AM

I would give up a lot of things for good mental health. No matter where I am, how popular and loved I am, no matter how much money I make, or how successful I am...I am stuck with my own mind, and it won't mean a thing if I'm not mentally healthy enough to enjoy it.

I'd sacrifice a little of my physical health though, if it meant that I could have my "dream" career, life in society, etc.

1
F55be68a03e578c64c526004505daae2

(85)

on September 16, 2011
at 01:24 PM

I wouldn't, it's not that hard to improve your health by making smart little changes. I don't think it'll ever be necessary to give up everything to get healthy.

1
306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on September 15, 2011
at 04:09 AM

Only if I felt it would also improve the health of my family overall (or have a neutral effect on other people, at least). My primary responsibility at this point in my life is to my kids, and while I believe in the oxygen mask theory, I don't think that extends to quitting my job because the hours aren't ideal for my long-term health.

0
870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on April 11, 2012
at 04:56 AM

Isn't this kind of circular? Suppose the act of "giving up everything" in and of itself had a negative effect on your physical or mental health?

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