2

votes

genetic problem with serotonin

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 07, 2012 at 12:55 AM

Over the past few months I've been taking tryptophan for insomnia and restlessness and found that it works really well, and now I can't seem to sleep without it. I've been overly alert my entire life and have always had problems sleeping. My mom said when I was a baby I was more sensitive to noise than all the other babies and have been ever since. At various times in my life I've fallen into depression, then taken anti-depressants which relieved it. I know better now and will never take an anti-depressant again due to the damaging effects they have on the brain, but I do think I may need to take tryptophan for the rest of my life if in fact I do have a genetic tendency to have low serotonin levels.
I've read that women on average have more of a tendency to produce less serotonin than men and thus are more prone to depression and the other problems that it causes, but I'm wondering what percentage of the total population might have this genetic problem. Do you think this might be a problem for a significant number of people, and is there any research to back it up?

D5a4ff096a452a84a772efa0e6bc626e

(2486)

on February 13, 2012
at 01:40 AM

Since this popped back up, here's a link that M. vaccae in soil ups serotonin when injested: http://discovermagazine.com/2007/jul/raw-data-is-dirt-the-new-prozac

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on February 08, 2012
at 05:56 PM

I'm right there with you, I have trouble getting up in the morning too, but have been having good results with a light therapy box on the days when we are without sun in Seattle. I've been able to move my wake up time to almost 3 hours earlier in just a week of remembering to turn it on first thing in the morning.

Medium avatar

on February 07, 2012
at 08:53 PM

Yea I agree it's a horrible feeling not getting any sun certain days and being up later at night because of it. My problem is my metabolism is so sluggish it's often hard for me to get up early in the morning so if I get sunlight it's not soon enough. But my goal at least is to get to the point where I get sun early every day and go to bed earlier every night.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on February 07, 2012
at 06:46 AM

Are you able to reduce your depression symptoms at all with sunlight exposure? That has been a big piece of the puzzle for me, especially on the falling asleep side of things. I feel like good sun exposure starting early in the day gets the serotonin ball rolling the best it can, so that it will convert to melatonin on its own and bring about sleepiness in the evening. If I don't get any sun it sort of feels like purgatory of never being fully awake but never really feeling sleepy either.

Medium avatar

on February 07, 2012
at 05:06 AM

I realize that there are many other causes of depression. In my opinion I think inflammation of the brain is probably the biggest and most common cause of it, but I'm focusing on serotonin because my mother and I seem to have all the symptoms of low serotonin and reduce those symptoms (and relieving anxiety and depression) when we take something that increases our serotonin levels. I'm not saying what the drug companies want us to believe is true, which is that the main cause of depression is low serotonin, I'm just saying maybe for some people with a genetic problem it is.

Medium avatar

on February 07, 2012
at 05:00 AM

Really interesting with that last part about some bacteria that produce lots of serotonin. I've read that some feed off it but never read that they actually produce it. Have any articles on that? One explanation is we have dysbiosis and the inflammation it produces damages the cells of our gut that produce serotonin. Since most of our serotonin is produced there maybe that's one reason why we have low serotonin levels.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on February 07, 2012
at 01:48 AM

You are not alone. I have a world class "startle reflex" and I need much more quiet than the average person.

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on February 07, 2012
at 01:25 AM

+1, I'm becoming quite intrigued by the inflammatory theory of depression lately.

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5 Answers

best answer

1
D5a4ff096a452a84a772efa0e6bc626e

(2486)

on February 07, 2012
at 03:08 AM

5-htp is instrumental for me in keeping my serotonin levels up. I currently think I'll take it (300 mg) forever, but I used to think that about my SSRIs too; for now, though, I notice when I miss even one dose. I'm not sure whether it's a genetic susceptibility or simply that my gut didn't populate correctly due to a lifelong undiagnosed gluten intolerance and resulting irritation. The fact that you're taking it for insomnia is strange to me (if anything, I take my large dose at night so I can have MORE dreams...) but if it works it works.

I used to startle quite easily too, and still do when I'm anxious. It mostly resolved itself when I took up boxing...Maybe it was putting on more muscle, maybe retraining my flinch instincts, masybe it was just concurrent with resolving some longstanding nutrient deficiencies.

p.s. I've had illness that made me supersick but SUPERcheerful at the same time. Always was a mystery until I learned that some digestion dwellers produce tons of serotonin. Maybe what you and I both need is just an influx of the rightwrong bugs...

Medium avatar

on February 07, 2012
at 05:00 AM

Really interesting with that last part about some bacteria that produce lots of serotonin. I've read that some feed off it but never read that they actually produce it. Have any articles on that? One explanation is we have dysbiosis and the inflammation it produces damages the cells of our gut that produce serotonin. Since most of our serotonin is produced there maybe that's one reason why we have low serotonin levels.

D5a4ff096a452a84a772efa0e6bc626e

(2486)

on February 13, 2012
at 01:40 AM

Since this popped back up, here's a link that M. vaccae in soil ups serotonin when injested: http://discovermagazine.com/2007/jul/raw-data-is-dirt-the-new-prozac

3
103a639b040a17bb579084287f2a5307

on February 07, 2012
at 01:32 AM

I would read "The Mood Cure" by Julia Ross. She does a great job of explaining how various mood disorders can be treated through diet and amino acid supplementation.

2
Da3d4a6835c0f5256b2ef829b3ba3393

on February 07, 2012
at 12:59 AM

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on February 07, 2012
at 01:25 AM

+1, I'm becoming quite intrigued by the inflammatory theory of depression lately.

Medium avatar

on February 07, 2012
at 05:06 AM

I realize that there are many other causes of depression. In my opinion I think inflammation of the brain is probably the biggest and most common cause of it, but I'm focusing on serotonin because my mother and I seem to have all the symptoms of low serotonin and reduce those symptoms (and relieving anxiety and depression) when we take something that increases our serotonin levels. I'm not saying what the drug companies want us to believe is true, which is that the main cause of depression is low serotonin, I'm just saying maybe for some people with a genetic problem it is.

0
8a1e8606618df3f78ce205f2940e0c04

on July 28, 2012
at 01:22 PM

I have been paleo for months now and sleep keeps getting worse and worse waking sometimes 6 to 7 times a night and recently having migraine like headaches. I'm starting to wonder if the lack of grain is responsible being a person prone to depression and anxiety.

0
Dbd88a34de1fd1b98c2d6986ee0543b6

on February 12, 2012
at 10:10 PM

From what i knew scientists started to think that serotonin levels are not the main cause for depression.

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