1

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Paleo vs Modern Dentistry

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 09, 2011 at 9:15 PM

I have some cracked teeth. The assumption, of course, is that I chewed on something hard and cracked them. The only thing I can think of are chicken bones, but I would think human teeth would be capable of dealing with them.
There is an alternative 'culprit'. Years ago the hygienist recommended a sonic toothbrush, and they now have a professional cleaning tool using similar technology. There are many structures vulnerable to such vibrations, so how did they decide teeth would be just fine with them? It seems plausible to me that these implements could be, at the very least, weakening the teeth. I just can't see the average dental office discovering this is the problem. They think the problem is jawbreakers or old age, and more cracks would tend to translate into more money for them, so where's their incentive to even notice?

So, do you think I've just done myself in going for the marrow like a caveman, or are my problems more likely caused by modern 'medicine'?

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on June 10, 2011
at 07:59 PM

I do consider myself in the Austrian camp. Thanks.

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on June 10, 2011
at 07:48 PM

I have supplemented with A,D,K, and magnesium for quite some time now. I did supplement with calcium for a while too, but some recent info seemed to suggest it was not necessary and dangerous. I agree with you about the pre-natal and developmental nutrition, but I also note that cracking began to happen after nutritional improvement and after the introduction of these sonic devices. If there were enough data on rates of cracking before and after the introduction of these devices (especially the office models), we'd have a clearer picture here.

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on June 10, 2011
at 07:48 PM

I was taking 5mg of K2. I actually thought I was overdoing it. The pills I have now are 1mg. What would be the right dose?

95eda9fa0cec952b482e869c34a566b6

on June 10, 2011
at 05:55 PM

What are those severe diseases?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on June 10, 2011
at 03:11 AM

likely a deficiency of the Ca/P pump in the teeth. K2 does help a tremendous amount but the dose needs to be higher than most think. Cracked teeth is a sign of a problem of the dentin tubules. The enamel then flakes off. Several severe diseases share the flaking phenomena.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 10, 2011
at 02:53 AM

I think he is saying that Jeff Volek cracked August's teeth. As a result of that action, he now spends his days writing grants.

95eda9fa0cec952b482e869c34a566b6

on June 10, 2011
at 02:50 AM

What does this have to do with August's question?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 10, 2011
at 02:02 AM

So what's your opinion about why August has cracked teeth?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 09, 2011
at 10:12 PM

BTW, two thumbs up for your blog. If you're promoting the Austrian economists, there is big chance we will have strong disagreements (although there is a place for Hayek in my thinking). Nonetheless, it is refreshing to click on a blog from someone here and find serious discussion of something unrelated to Paleo.

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4 Answers

best answer

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 09, 2011
at 10:03 PM

My first assumption would be that you got your butt kicked in a fight. However, you might be on to something. I would think that gnawing on chicken bones would be good for your teeth. Of course, if you just chomped down hard on one that might crack them,but I would think that you would recall such an incident. Maybe your body is leaching calcium due to a deficiency. Maybe you should try adding in more good dairy to your diet...a lot more good dairy.

Seeing as Dr. Q studied dentistry maybe he has some good ideas on the matter.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 09, 2011
at 10:12 PM

BTW, two thumbs up for your blog. If you're promoting the Austrian economists, there is big chance we will have strong disagreements (although there is a place for Hayek in my thinking). Nonetheless, it is refreshing to click on a blog from someone here and find serious discussion of something unrelated to Paleo.

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on June 10, 2011
at 07:59 PM

I do consider myself in the Austrian camp. Thanks.

1
33b6c516904a967ef8ecb30f1dbd8cf2

(7073)

on June 10, 2011
at 06:09 PM

The average SAD diet causes the weakness, not vibrations from toothbrushes. Lack of minerals esp. calcium and magnesium, vitamins A and D and a lack of a good supply of electrolytes causes bones and teeth to weaken and crack over time. Eating wheat and sugar products cause more weakness by depleting the body of these essential elements. Even when in the womb, if the mother's nutrition was not sufficient then the structure of bone and teeth is never properly formed.

I turned the state of my teeth around in two years after adopting paleo. OK, I had the help of an holistic dentist who supported me throughout my dietary changes, but it was basically up to me at the end of the day. Dentists are there to fix problems caused by modern diets, and can sell anything to anyone who has no basic concept of what it takes to get into and stay in optimum health, and turn to 'experts' to fix them, usually when it is too late.

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on June 10, 2011
at 07:48 PM

I have supplemented with A,D,K, and magnesium for quite some time now. I did supplement with calcium for a while too, but some recent info seemed to suggest it was not necessary and dangerous. I agree with you about the pre-natal and developmental nutrition, but I also note that cracking began to happen after nutritional improvement and after the introduction of these sonic devices. If there were enough data on rates of cracking before and after the introduction of these devices (especially the office models), we'd have a clearer picture here.

0
7431586c21bca496c5a7ec7bd0ca4d6e

(974)

on June 10, 2011
at 02:24 AM

Maybe some deficiency...magnesium, vit d, vit k2...

0
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on June 10, 2011
at 02:00 AM

Calcium/Phosphorus pump issues.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on June 10, 2011
at 03:11 AM

likely a deficiency of the Ca/P pump in the teeth. K2 does help a tremendous amount but the dose needs to be higher than most think. Cracked teeth is a sign of a problem of the dentin tubules. The enamel then flakes off. Several severe diseases share the flaking phenomena.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 10, 2011
at 02:02 AM

So what's your opinion about why August has cracked teeth?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 10, 2011
at 02:53 AM

I think he is saying that Jeff Volek cracked August's teeth. As a result of that action, he now spends his days writing grants.

95eda9fa0cec952b482e869c34a566b6

on June 10, 2011
at 02:50 AM

What does this have to do with August's question?

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on June 10, 2011
at 07:48 PM

I was taking 5mg of K2. I actually thought I was overdoing it. The pills I have now are 1mg. What would be the right dose?

95eda9fa0cec952b482e869c34a566b6

on June 10, 2011
at 05:55 PM

What are those severe diseases?

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