2

votes

Have you reduced the amount of dental x-rays due to possible tumor risk?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 18, 2012 at 4:00 PM

I realize this is a possible correlation but it's still a bit disturbing.

http://articles.boston.com/2012-04-10/lifestyle/31319572_1_x-rays-tumor-risk-radiation-exposure

My husband had cavities about 20 years ago, has had his wisdom teeth removed, had braces in the teens, but hasn't had any cavities in the last 10 years.

I've never had a cavity or braces, but have only 1 wisdom tooth left (the other were removed but I chose to keep the last one due to it being close to a nerve).

We've been drinking fluoride-free water for 4 years.

We alternate between non-fluoride Tom's of Maine and Tropical Traditions toothpaste brushing with the Sonicare electric brush twice daily, use Tom's of Maine mouthwash twice daily, and floss daily.

Our dentist thinks are teeth are great.

How frequently do you have dental x-rays or would you recommend them?

Thanks.

355ae559fc7c4038c63b5897d74e8a40

(196)

on May 19, 2013
at 04:13 PM

Exposure to ionising radiation is strictly controlled here in the UK, so yes, that obviously influences my approach.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on May 19, 2013
at 02:54 PM

Oh, you're in the UK? That explains your approach to dentistry.

F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

(2036)

on May 19, 2012
at 12:02 AM

also, you can reduce your exposure with the lower-radiation digital x-rays.

2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on May 18, 2012
at 07:48 PM

I almost forgot, make sure the lead apron has a thyroid shield on it, too.

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3 Answers

4
2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on May 18, 2012
at 06:32 PM

I am a dentist with a low carb approach to the practice of dentistry. I would recommend bite wing radiographs every 18 months. Full set every 5-7 years. There are other reasons besides decay to radiograph. Restoration status and bone levels come to mind.

2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on May 18, 2012
at 07:48 PM

I almost forgot, make sure the lead apron has a thyroid shield on it, too.

F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

(2036)

on May 19, 2012
at 12:02 AM

also, you can reduce your exposure with the lower-radiation digital x-rays.

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 18, 2012
at 11:35 PM

I've reduced the amount of dental x-rays I get for the simple reason of avoiding the dentist.

0
355ae559fc7c4038c63b5897d74e8a40

on May 16, 2013
at 07:37 PM

I take the obligation to minimise exposure to ionising radiation extremely seriously. There is no such thing as "routine" xrays in my book. In the uk, the regulations surrounding the use of ionising radiation mean that each patient's need for every single exposure to xrays should be assessed on an ad hoc basis that takes into account things like age, diet, oral hygiene, snacking habits, history of incidence of caries, history of gum disease, etc. An xray shoild be taken only if there is a proven clinical justification for doing so, ie when diagnosis can only be made or best treatment carried out with the help of a radiograph.

355ae559fc7c4038c63b5897d74e8a40

(196)

on May 19, 2013
at 04:13 PM

Exposure to ionising radiation is strictly controlled here in the UK, so yes, that obviously influences my approach.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on May 19, 2013
at 02:54 PM

Oh, you're in the UK? That explains your approach to dentistry.

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