1

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Why is full fat dairy higher on the glycemic index than low fat or skim

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 01, 2013 at 1:58 PM

Here's the link to the page

http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsweek/Glycemic_index_and_glycemic_load_for_100_foods.htm

I thought that fat slowed digestion so that the glucose from the lactose enters your bloodstream slower?

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on August 02, 2013
at 03:54 PM

Yeah skim milk is only wonderful for the dairy producers. They sell the skim as "healthy" and steal the cream for ice cream. Pure profit. I've read that even the stuff labeled whole milk has a little of the fat skimmed off it.

14b8422e9b449a21e06fa3349953d4f7

(220)

on August 01, 2013
at 11:47 PM

I do however, absolutely love whole milk yogurt and whole milk everything else

14b8422e9b449a21e06fa3349953d4f7

(220)

on August 01, 2013
at 11:46 PM

And skim milk isn't higher in carbs it just has less fat and more water, which is why I think it and every product made with it(yogurt,kefir etc.) tastes horrible. Not to mention it doesn't contain the beneficial fat soluble vitamins(A,D,E,K2) and it doesn't contain the conjugated linoliec acid(I might have spelt that the wrong way)

14b8422e9b449a21e06fa3349953d4f7

(220)

on August 01, 2013
at 11:42 PM

The reason I was confused was because the sugar in milk is lactose, which is a disaccharide that doesn't contain fructose(which needs to be processed by the liver), it contains the monosaccharides glucose and galactose, which are very quick digesting. In skim milk, without the presence of fat to slow digestion, it raises blood sugar fairly quickly. But in full fat I would assume it is lower GI because of the fat, but was surprised to see Harvard publish that it wasn't. But I guess my source was bad and whole milk is lower on the glycemic index anyway

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3 Answers

2
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 02, 2013
at 12:02 AM

The resource they're drawing their information from is multiple studies using different subjects and thus different glycemic responses are to be expected. It's good for rough estimates of the glycemic index of foods, but not for close comparisons.

Their resource gets the glycemic index of skim milk from a study on healthy people, but gets the glycemic index for whole milk from studies on both healthy people and type 2 diabetics, so it's obviously not a fair comparison.

As far as I know, most studies which actually compare whole and skim milk using randomized subjects do not find skim milk to have a lower GI compared to whole milk. In the following study there was no difference:

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/34/3/362.full.pdf

1
1a6ad0d62f779ca50babe92d70ea6a0c

(137)

on August 01, 2013
at 11:21 PM

This doesn't actually make sense. I did a few quick searches (so take it for what it's worth), and I'm seeing full fat or 3.25% milk is sitting around 8-10 on the glycemic index, not 41 like your link says. The link you provided is the only one I've seen claiming that full fat milk is higher.

Take into account heavy cream which is almost non existent on the glycemic index. Foods that have more added sugar tend to have a quicker rise in blood glucose levels equating to a higher glycemic index. I would think that full fat milk has less sugar in it than skim. I also think skim milk is higher carb than full fat.

14b8422e9b449a21e06fa3349953d4f7

(220)

on August 01, 2013
at 11:46 PM

And skim milk isn't higher in carbs it just has less fat and more water, which is why I think it and every product made with it(yogurt,kefir etc.) tastes horrible. Not to mention it doesn't contain the beneficial fat soluble vitamins(A,D,E,K2) and it doesn't contain the conjugated linoliec acid(I might have spelt that the wrong way)

14b8422e9b449a21e06fa3349953d4f7

(220)

on August 01, 2013
at 11:47 PM

I do however, absolutely love whole milk yogurt and whole milk everything else

14b8422e9b449a21e06fa3349953d4f7

(220)

on August 01, 2013
at 11:42 PM

The reason I was confused was because the sugar in milk is lactose, which is a disaccharide that doesn't contain fructose(which needs to be processed by the liver), it contains the monosaccharides glucose and galactose, which are very quick digesting. In skim milk, without the presence of fat to slow digestion, it raises blood sugar fairly quickly. But in full fat I would assume it is lower GI because of the fat, but was surprised to see Harvard publish that it wasn't. But I guess my source was bad and whole milk is lower on the glycemic index anyway

0
C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on August 01, 2013
at 02:06 PM

That is a little confusing. But I did come across this recently. Another study in the Archives of Disease in Childhood in March echoed the JAMA study and showed that children who drank lower-fat milk were more likely to be overweight later in life.

"Our original hypothesis was that children who drank high-fat milk, either whole milk or 2 percent would be heavier because they were consuming more saturated fat calories," author Dr. Mark Daniel DeBoer, an associate professor of pediatric endocrinology at the University of Virginia School of Medicine and the chair-elect for the AAP Committee on Nutrition, explained to TIME. "We were really surprised when we looked at the data and it was very clear that within every ethnicity and every socioeconomic strata, that it was actually the opposite, that children who drank skim milk and 1 percent were heavier than those who drank 2 percent and whole."

Who knows, but both are low glycemic.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on August 02, 2013
at 03:54 PM

Yeah skim milk is only wonderful for the dairy producers. They sell the skim as "healthy" and steal the cream for ice cream. Pure profit. I've read that even the stuff labeled whole milk has a little of the fat skimmed off it.

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