2

votes

Why high fat dairy?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 22, 2011 at 2:20 PM

I've seen people mention that high-fat dairy is okay in moderation (if you can handle dairy). Why high fat dairy versus low fat dairy?

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on August 22, 2011
at 08:21 PM

I might add that my dairy consumption is quite low, in fact. I've had it out completely until lately to experiment putting it back in. I'm taking one scoop of whey post workout (obviously not a full fat dairy issue there) and am eating a few spoonfuls of Greek yogurt here and there. I look for yogurt with ingredient list that looks like "milk and live cultures" and nothing else. My question is not so much "which is better," but more so "if I am looking to dairy for this purpose, does less fat make sense" (e.g. post workout).

A64ed062eb5e2c3407122fcf16c5de6b

(715)

on August 22, 2011
at 07:36 PM

@Tom Wow that is really surprising in light of the other responses - I wonder what causes you to have digestive issues with full fat milk? See also the comment by Aaron B, perhaps you should try several brands? Maybe the 2% option somehow ends up with less casein or lactose?

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on August 22, 2011
at 07:08 PM

That carageenan is some nasty stuff!

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on August 22, 2011
at 07:06 PM

The three problematic molecules in dairy are lactose, casein and whey. High fat dairy avoids (or minimizes) those issues leaving only fatty wonderfulness. The fat is where the good stuff is, like the yolk of the egg.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on August 22, 2011
at 07:03 PM

And all the fat soluble vitamins - A, D, E, K. And the saturated fat for gosh sakes!

A6e2b231f69366ce825476c5a6dcfff6

(1967)

on August 22, 2011
at 06:20 PM

low fat milk is just sugar water

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on August 22, 2011
at 06:02 PM

The fat content has nothing to do with whether it's raw or not, since pasteurization doesn't add or remove fat. The fat content depends on the cow. Holsteins give the least fat, while Jerseys give up around 5%, and some lesser-known breeds give more than that. Whole milk in the store had been skimmed and then had just enough cream added back to it to bring it up to 3.25% fat. So depending where you get your raw milk, and whether they skim off any cream before selling it to you, it *may* have more fat than that.

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on August 22, 2011
at 05:42 PM

Amy Kubal. Very cool. You address the benefits of the dairy fat (which I don't dispute), and many of the other responses to this question address taste, etc. A little different take: if a person gets enough fat in his/her diet and looks to dairy for an additional source of easily ingestible protein source, is lower fat a viable option so as to not get as "full" on the fat? I try to avoid "skim" options but seem to digest the 2% options better than the full fat options. Appreciate any comments you have.

  • B2cadbf43bddfbb523b8a53155656188

    asked by

    (548)
  • Views
    2.9K
  • Last Activity
    1278D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

11 Answers

8
E359651ec162810a18aca705f7c3f210

on August 22, 2011
at 02:48 PM

The fat in dairy contains CLA - it's the most beneficial component in milk!! It's all stripped out in fat free dairy!

http://robbwolf.com/consulting/amy-kubal-consulting/

A64ed062eb5e2c3407122fcf16c5de6b

(715)

on August 22, 2011
at 07:36 PM

@Tom Wow that is really surprising in light of the other responses - I wonder what causes you to have digestive issues with full fat milk? See also the comment by Aaron B, perhaps you should try several brands? Maybe the 2% option somehow ends up with less casein or lactose?

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on August 22, 2011
at 05:42 PM

Amy Kubal. Very cool. You address the benefits of the dairy fat (which I don't dispute), and many of the other responses to this question address taste, etc. A little different take: if a person gets enough fat in his/her diet and looks to dairy for an additional source of easily ingestible protein source, is lower fat a viable option so as to not get as "full" on the fat? I try to avoid "skim" options but seem to digest the 2% options better than the full fat options. Appreciate any comments you have.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on August 22, 2011
at 07:03 PM

And all the fat soluble vitamins - A, D, E, K. And the saturated fat for gosh sakes!

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on August 22, 2011
at 08:21 PM

I might add that my dairy consumption is quite low, in fact. I've had it out completely until lately to experiment putting it back in. I'm taking one scoop of whey post workout (obviously not a full fat dairy issue there) and am eating a few spoonfuls of Greek yogurt here and there. I look for yogurt with ingredient list that looks like "milk and live cultures" and nothing else. My question is not so much "which is better," but more so "if I am looking to dairy for this purpose, does less fat make sense" (e.g. post workout).

4
F40555b9be81e12c2fc460e6fa7d097c

on August 22, 2011
at 02:43 PM

As long as you're getting your milk from grass fed cattle (which you should be, and the more raw the better) then the fat s where the good stuff is! Stearic acid produced by grass fed cattle is awesome for you and it is a saturated fat. Why would you want to drink low fat dairy anyway? It tastes like milk flavored water (gross).

3
9846ee79687cfcdb8f67da838f295e0c

(209)

on August 22, 2011
at 03:35 PM

The most important nutrients and vitamins are found in the fat of dairy. Also it's mostly saturated fat s that's really great too. Full fat dairy tastes so much better too.

2
Medium avatar

(19469)

on August 22, 2011
at 05:53 PM

High fat dairy pros include (assuming grass-fed and/or raw/minimally processed): CLA, Vitamins A & D, Calcium, minimal lactose (sugar involved in intolerance), minimal casein (protein often involved in milk sensitivities), saturated fat, X factor (for all you WAP folks, Vit K2 for everybody else) and unoxidized cholesterol.

Low fat dairy cons include: high lactose, higher casein, oxidized cholesterol (milk powder added back to increase "body"), "fortified" with vitamins rather than naturally occurring, higher likelihood of additives (guar gum, carageenan, etc.)

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on August 22, 2011
at 07:08 PM

That carageenan is some nasty stuff!

2
67460907f9d818f56e1ef4c846317386

on August 22, 2011
at 04:17 PM

Well, one thing we can usually agree on here is to avoid as much processing as possible. And creating low-fat milk requires additional processing and the end product is less nutritious (as the important micronutrients are in the fat as others have alluded to). If you were a small farmer producing your own milk, you'd drink full fat milk because that is what the cow gave you.

0
669790861549f3c6d54d88a65296ed19

(452)

on August 22, 2011
at 05:45 PM

I actually read on some WAPF'ers blog that rawmilk in fact doesn't contain that much fat.

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on August 22, 2011
at 06:02 PM

The fat content has nothing to do with whether it's raw or not, since pasteurization doesn't add or remove fat. The fat content depends on the cow. Holsteins give the least fat, while Jerseys give up around 5%, and some lesser-known breeds give more than that. Whole milk in the store had been skimmed and then had just enough cream added back to it to bring it up to 3.25% fat. So depending where you get your raw milk, and whether they skim off any cream before selling it to you, it *may* have more fat than that.

0
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on August 22, 2011
at 05:25 PM

Like others have said, when you take the fat out all you're left with is sugar water. I'm pretty intolerant of dairy, but I can have 16 oz heavy cream lattes with no issue, and my main cooking fat is butter. So that leads me to believe that most of the bad stuff is not in the dairy fat.

0
095ef76482234d3db444b77d7ed01c29

(2755)

on August 22, 2011
at 05:22 PM

More natural. More fat. Fat is good. Don't forget the saturated fat is needed for proper hormone function.

0
03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on August 22, 2011
at 03:31 PM

The point isn't to get dairy, but to get fat. (Low-fat dairy is just liquid sugar plus whatever additives.) It can be difficult to get enough fat into your diet when you try to keep down your PUFA intake, with the way livestock have been bred to be extra lean, and the high expense of other healthy fats like coconut oil. So high-fat dairy like butter and cream can be a good source of saturated fat, as long as you aren't dairy intolerant.

0
B14dc4aa1ddefbec3bc09550428ee493

on August 22, 2011
at 03:23 PM

And it just tastes better! Life is too short to not enjoy your food, I say.

0
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on August 22, 2011
at 02:28 PM

Less lactose. Which is less sugar and folks often react to lactose.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!