3

votes

Why bother with fermented foods?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 09, 2010 at 5:33 PM

I have been buying raw milk from happy Jersey cows that are organic, and grass fed. At the farm the owners use a lot of kefir and taught me how to make it. In what way is drinking kefir superior to plain raw milk?

Eb2d0a3a9b3d909d62b479a0af24d431

(155)

on January 31, 2011
at 12:54 PM

Depending how the person has produced their kefir, it can have a strong carbonated taste to it or it can be very mild. I recommend trying another brand before making up your mind.

3d7ede9d05c2730ead7e0876f90aad11

(319)

on March 10, 2010
at 06:45 AM

Well, I've done that. It was pretty easy. I very rarely will have a sprouted grain bun but if I do I can't eat much else but a grass fed beef burger and the bun--so I've eliminated that too in favor of adding a vegetable like cauliflower or steamed chard/spinach. I find I'm only hungry for one meal a day so I have to pack it with nutrients.

3d7ede9d05c2730ead7e0876f90aad11

(319)

on March 10, 2010
at 06:39 AM

I'm already getting used to it. I make a variety of smoothies. At first I added ice cream and some sugar and about 5 frozen cherries. It was sour but I liked it. Now I can skip the ice cream and sugar--add some ice instead and dark organic choc syrup. Oh my. It fills me up and I don't want anything else to eat.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 10, 2010
at 03:14 AM

Weel, then there's hope because I already like sour stuff.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 10, 2010
at 03:04 AM

It takes quite some time to acclimate your tastebuds to it, but I found it was definitely worth it because now I crave sour rather than sweet foods. I studied abroad in Sweden and most of the other international students couldn't stand the local fermented milks, but I had been drinking kefir for awhile back in the states and was able to enjoy all five gazillion types of Nordic ferments.

5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

(1922)

on March 09, 2010
at 11:17 PM

Leaky gut also often goes away after you eliminate grains....

3d7ede9d05c2730ead7e0876f90aad11

(319)

on March 09, 2010
at 06:43 PM

Thanks, Melissa. I did look back at the other threads and they were a helpful reminder of why I was interested in fermented foods to begin with. Chronic inflammation can result from a leaky gut. Repairing a leaky gut ravaged by years less than healthy nutritional choices may be possible by using fermented foods. It seems worth the try.

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2 Answers

best answer

7
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 09, 2010
at 06:15 PM

You might want to look at this question. The short answer is that fermented foods may be probiotic AND they are generally easier to digest. Particularly in the case of milk, since kefir has less lactose then milk.

3d7ede9d05c2730ead7e0876f90aad11

(319)

on March 09, 2010
at 06:43 PM

Thanks, Melissa. I did look back at the other threads and they were a helpful reminder of why I was interested in fermented foods to begin with. Chronic inflammation can result from a leaky gut. Repairing a leaky gut ravaged by years less than healthy nutritional choices may be possible by using fermented foods. It seems worth the try.

5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

(1922)

on March 09, 2010
at 11:17 PM

Leaky gut also often goes away after you eliminate grains....

3d7ede9d05c2730ead7e0876f90aad11

(319)

on March 10, 2010
at 06:45 AM

Well, I've done that. It was pretty easy. I very rarely will have a sprouted grain bun but if I do I can't eat much else but a grass fed beef burger and the bun--so I've eliminated that too in favor of adding a vegetable like cauliflower or steamed chard/spinach. I find I'm only hungry for one meal a day so I have to pack it with nutrients.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 10, 2010
at 02:58 AM

Egads, the only time I ever tried a kefir-like product it was the Iranian version and I thought it tasted like carbonated cr*p. However, from what I have just been reading, the stuff appears to be very good for you (or me) and I may have to give it another try.

3d7ede9d05c2730ead7e0876f90aad11

(319)

on March 10, 2010
at 06:39 AM

I'm already getting used to it. I make a variety of smoothies. At first I added ice cream and some sugar and about 5 frozen cherries. It was sour but I liked it. Now I can skip the ice cream and sugar--add some ice instead and dark organic choc syrup. Oh my. It fills me up and I don't want anything else to eat.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 10, 2010
at 03:14 AM

Weel, then there's hope because I already like sour stuff.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 10, 2010
at 03:04 AM

It takes quite some time to acclimate your tastebuds to it, but I found it was definitely worth it because now I crave sour rather than sweet foods. I studied abroad in Sweden and most of the other international students couldn't stand the local fermented milks, but I had been drinking kefir for awhile back in the states and was able to enjoy all five gazillion types of Nordic ferments.

Eb2d0a3a9b3d909d62b479a0af24d431

(155)

on January 31, 2011
at 12:54 PM

Depending how the person has produced their kefir, it can have a strong carbonated taste to it or it can be very mild. I recommend trying another brand before making up your mind.

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