1

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Tallow and dairy allergy?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 11, 2011 at 9:40 AM

Hi,

I can't eat butter and ghee due to my dairy allergy. Coconut oil and olive oil both give my digestion real trouble. So the only source of fat for me currently is lard and goose fat - but they do not have such a great omega 3/6 profile. Tallow would be a solution, but since I'm cross-allergic to beef, I'm not positive this will work for me.

The questions:

Is there anybody with dairy and/or beef allergy who tolerates beef tallow well? And can anyone name a fat alternative in my case, which has a healthy omega profile? (I cant think of any)

Thanks, Thomy

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on December 11, 2011
at 07:39 PM

Well, you're going to have to explore some non-optimal oils then for your fat sources, how about canola or high oleic sunflower oils? Or just simply a low-fat diet (Kitavan-esque or even carb-ier!)

Medium avatar

(19469)

on December 11, 2011
at 05:15 PM

Consuming just the yolk seems to work for people who don't tolerate eggs well. The white contains protein, but none of the fat, so avoiding this portion of the egg won't affect o3 intake.

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 11, 2011
at 05:08 PM

Maybe the safest decision for now. I didnt know even lard could cause such a reaction in people allergic to pork

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 11, 2011
at 05:06 PM

As for olive oil I havent found a single brand which doesnt give me diarrhea and coconut oil makes me really (!) tired - which ingredient could be causing this?

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 11, 2011
at 05:00 PM

The main culprit for dairy-beef-cross-allergy is the bovine serum albumine, I think, which might be present in the tallow as well. Since even ghee gives me lots of trouble I thought that those tiny traces in the tallow could be also a problem. I guess I have to try it and lock me up for 3 days in the restroom :D..

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 11, 2011
at 04:53 PM

Somehow its quite difficult to get good quality lamb fat here in germany. As a dog-food-supplement its omnipresent - just for human consumption I cant find it. Btw: how do you like the taste? I heard it has kind of a strange taste

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 11, 2011
at 04:48 PM

I dont tolerate eggs very well, but I have yet to try the yolk alone. If that works, this would be another omega 3 supplement. (The egg white has none of the omega 3 content, has it?)

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 11, 2011
at 04:43 PM

lamb is a great idea! would palm kernel oil cause the same digestive problems as coconut oil, since they are so close in chemical composition? fish is great, but I gobble up almost 250 grams of fat per day, so thats no option, unfortunately. is cocoa butter really paleo?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on December 11, 2011
at 02:58 PM

It's easy to have twice the omega-3s when eggs aren't exactly high to begin with. 37 mg/large egg. (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/111/2) Not saying pastured eggs aren't better though.

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7 Answers

best answer

2
7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on December 11, 2011
at 05:00 PM

I don't tolerate any dairy, even ghee, but I do well with beef. I think if you're allergic to beef, you need to avoid tallow until you can tolerate beef again. My sister is allergic to pork and can tell if she has eaten lard within 2 bites, so an allergy to the protein can still come through in the fat. My advice to you would be to source the best pork fat you can: some farmers do have pigs that eat mostly grass, and very little grain. That would be a good source from which to render your lard. Then make sure to eat fatty fish or take omega-3 supplements to balance out the omega-6.

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 11, 2011
at 05:08 PM

Maybe the safest decision for now. I didnt know even lard could cause such a reaction in people allergic to pork

1
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on December 12, 2011
at 02:38 AM

Goat fat. Melissa says it is delicious. I've been looking for some local to try

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on December 11, 2011
at 04:42 PM

Have you tried more processed oils? Refined coconut, non-virgin olive oils? Allergies and sensitivities aren't due to the fat, it's the traces of organics, proteins, carbohydates, etc in the fat. I know paleo dogma says stick to unrefined oils, but in your case you might have to make the compromise.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on December 11, 2011
at 07:39 PM

Well, you're going to have to explore some non-optimal oils then for your fat sources, how about canola or high oleic sunflower oils? Or just simply a low-fat diet (Kitavan-esque or even carb-ier!)

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 11, 2011
at 05:06 PM

As for olive oil I havent found a single brand which doesnt give me diarrhea and coconut oil makes me really (!) tired - which ingredient could be causing this?

1
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 11, 2011
at 04:36 PM

Since you're allergic, I'm a little uncomfortable offering advice as I'm only lactose intolerant. I have no problem at all with beef tallow. Any serving of beef includes a small amount of tallow, so using tallow for cooking just restores the typical fat content in extra-lean meat.

For eggs, for some reason, I prefer butter. That used to give me a little trouble too, so I used to make ghee, but these days I tolerate occasional servings of Kerrygold pretty well.

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 11, 2011
at 05:00 PM

The main culprit for dairy-beef-cross-allergy is the bovine serum albumine, I think, which might be present in the tallow as well. Since even ghee gives me lots of trouble I thought that those tiny traces in the tallow could be also a problem. I guess I have to try it and lock me up for 3 days in the restroom :D..

1
7a6c23d8a4ab7aea0367b14850e77316

on December 11, 2011
at 03:13 PM

I get lamb fast from the local butcher (free) and render it. Probably the best fat after grass fed beef.

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 11, 2011
at 04:53 PM

Somehow its quite difficult to get good quality lamb fat here in germany. As a dog-food-supplement its omnipresent - just for human consumption I cant find it. Btw: how do you like the taste? I heard it has kind of a strange taste

1
Medium avatar

(19469)

on December 11, 2011
at 02:20 PM

What about pastured chicken eggs?

From http://handcraftedcoops.com/...

"Most of the eggs currently sold in supermarkets are nutritionally inferior to eggs produced by hens raised on pasture and in backyards across the country. That???s the conclusion of a 2007 Mother Earth News egg testing project. The testing found that, compared to official U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutrient data for commercial eggs, eggs from hens raised on pasture contain:

??? 1/3 less cholesterol ?????? 1/4 less saturated fat??? ??? 2/3 more vitamin A ??? ??? 2 times more omega- 3 fatty acids ??? ??? 3 times more vitamin E??? ??? 7 times more beta carotene

These amazing results come from egg samples collected from 14 flocks around the country that range freely on pasture or are housed in portable chicken coops that are rotated frequently to maximize access to fresh pasture and protect the birds from predators. The Mother Earth News research team sampled six eggs from each of the 14 pastured flocks tested by an accredited laboratory in Portland, Ore. The egg samples were analyzed for nutrient content and then those results were compared with the official egg nutrient data from the USDA for ???conventional??? (i.e. factory hens) eggs."

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 11, 2011
at 04:48 PM

I dont tolerate eggs very well, but I have yet to try the yolk alone. If that works, this would be another omega 3 supplement. (The egg white has none of the omega 3 content, has it?)

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on December 11, 2011
at 02:58 PM

It's easy to have twice the omega-3s when eggs aren't exactly high to begin with. 37 mg/large egg. (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/111/2) Not saying pastured eggs aren't better though.

Medium avatar

(19469)

on December 11, 2011
at 05:15 PM

Consuming just the yolk seems to work for people who don't tolerate eggs well. The white contains protein, but none of the fat, so avoiding this portion of the egg won't affect o3 intake.

1
50e94d7b6b01e6cb87889c6541adc90c

on December 11, 2011
at 10:34 AM

What about fish and fish oil, lamb, palm kernel oil, cocoa butter ?

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on December 11, 2011
at 04:43 PM

lamb is a great idea! would palm kernel oil cause the same digestive problems as coconut oil, since they are so close in chemical composition? fish is great, but I gobble up almost 250 grams of fat per day, so thats no option, unfortunately. is cocoa butter really paleo?

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