1

votes

Opinion of my reconstituted milk?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 11, 2010 at 12:11 AM

Preface: I tend to follow the Kurt Harris idea of utilizing beneficial neolithic foods. As such, I consume dairy on occasion, like heavy cream and butter, or whey protein when in a hurry.

It is my understanding, that some of the main problems with milk is the presence of lactose, A1 casein, and the high sugar content.

A recent concoction of mine is a glass of:

  • 3/4 full of water
  • a scoop of whey protein
  • heavy cream to top it off

The result is a quasi milk-like drink high in good whey protein and fat, without the sugars and only trace amounts of lactose and casein.

I'm curious what other people think of this. I know its not "paleo" by definition, but it seems to me like it would be beneficial to drink.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on May 11, 2010
at 04:28 PM

Yeah, I subscribe to that newsletter and read this one. In some situations I'm trying to figure out what the best options is when meat or seafood isn't an option. Should you use legumes, or whey protein? Obviously, neither is optimal, but sometimes optimal isn't a choice.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on May 11, 2010
at 04:26 PM

Honestly, I know some people who have severe food restrictions be it meat/seafood, or even iodine intake. Strict paleo is not always an option, so finding "good enough" solutions is important.

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3 Answers

1
93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on May 11, 2010
at 01:57 AM

@David Csonka

Cordain recently mentioned potential downsides of whey protein in his latest email newsletter.


Excerpt:

Unfortunately, at this point, most of the research has focused on the beneficial effects of whey. It basically revolves around whey's high BCAA content, its use as a post-workout recovery drink ingredient, and its capacity ??? due to cysteine ??? to increase Glutathione, a powerful endogenous antioxidant enzyme.

Nevertheless, we believe that whey protein can have some potential adverse effects, because it greatly elevates insulinemia - although it can be therapeutic for diabetics in the short term. We suspect that whey protein could be detrimental long term, as hyperinsulinemia can down-regulate the insulin receptor and lead to insulin resistance. Insulin resistance underlies the Metabolic Syndrome, and is implicated in various other diseases, such as Acne, Alzheimer, various cancers, Coronary Heart Disease, Myopia, PCOS, etc.).

But to be completely sure, we would need intervention studies with whey protein with a relatively long duration in people genetically prone to insulin resistance, or who are in fact insulin resistant.

Also, there is the matter of hormones in milk: estrogens, DHT precursors, Insulin, IGF-1 and the hormone Betacellulin (BTC), which Dr. Cordain has discussed in a previous edition of this newsletter. These are some of the possible mechanisms for which there is repeated epidemiological evidence associating milk consumption with some cancers - especially Prostate Cancer.

We know that these hormones are present in milk and - in the case of BTC - it is present in whey too. Nevertheless, the real content of all these hormones in commercial milk-derived products is an open question that deserves proper and urgent study. So while we don???t know for sure, and since and we have alternatives, I would follow the old saying: do no harm!

Finally, if you have an auto-immune disease or allergy to Beta Lacto Globulin (protein that exists in bovine milk, but nonexistent in human milk) I would stay away from whey. Whey contains not only Beta Lacto Globulin, but also Bovine Serum Albumin. Some peptides from this protein have structural homology with peptides from our own tissues, and BSA has been implicated in Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis and Type 1 Diabetes.

In conclusion,, I would follow the evolutionary template until all these issues are resolved. which states that recently introduced foods may have potential adverse effects to humans, especially long term. Non-human milk was only introduced in the human diet ~10,000 years ago. Therefore, given the potential health hazards of milk that science is revealing, I would use another protein source. Lean meat and seafood are very good sources of BCAA. If you want a protein drink immediately after strength training to speed recovery and increase muscle mass, I would suggest ~9 grams of essential amino acids, along with a banana.

I hope this helps. Cordially, Pedro Bastos

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on May 11, 2010
at 04:28 PM

Yeah, I subscribe to that newsletter and read this one. In some situations I'm trying to figure out what the best options is when meat or seafood isn't an option. Should you use legumes, or whey protein? Obviously, neither is optimal, but sometimes optimal isn't a choice.

0
5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on May 12, 2010
at 06:25 AM

Ditch the protein powder and water and shake an egg or two in some cream. Awesome post training drink. My favourite.

0
6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on May 11, 2010
at 01:20 PM

My bias is to eat whole, unprocessed foods, unless you need the components for a specific purpose. To process a whole food into its parts, then put some of them back together to create a substitute, seems a bit convoluted to me. It's almost like drinking baby formula instead of breast milk. If you're allergic to dairy, you can't drink this concoction anyway. Why not just drink whole, raw milk? To me, the presence of casein and sugar is outweighed by the fact that it's whole and unprocessed.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6082)

on May 11, 2010
at 04:26 PM

Honestly, I know some people who have severe food restrictions be it meat/seafood, or even iodine intake. Strict paleo is not always an option, so finding "good enough" solutions is important.

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