2

votes

Lactose / Casein amounts in dairy derived products?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 27, 2010 at 8:37 PM

Obviously, lactose and casein are components of milk. I'm curious how much lactose and casein remains in products derived from milk such as: heavy cream, butter, and cheese? If somebody could provide a basic chart or list that would be awesome.

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

(1932)

on April 28, 2010
at 04:54 PM

Here's a chart that compares the various types of cream: http://whatscookingamerica.net/Sauces_Condiments/CreamDefinitions.htm In my experience in England, double cream (as least it was labeled as such) - is eaten with a spoon. That is the same as what I bought at Whole Foods called "clotted cream." So, definitions are not universal between various countries. It's all good :-)

0d821bf7d4028b84a6838062db0e9ce0

(754)

on April 28, 2010
at 02:22 PM

doesn't most of the lactose get eaten by the bacterial cultures in the cases of yogurt, kefir, cultured butter, buttermilk etc?

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on April 28, 2010
at 12:45 PM

Double cream is heavy cream I understand..

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on April 28, 2010
at 09:32 AM

Made an edit for you David. There appears to be no American equivalent to UK grade double cream which is 50% fat. I didn't realise the grades were so different in the US.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on April 28, 2010
at 06:26 AM

One teaspoon of butter contains 0.03 grams of lactose; http://www.gastro.net.au/diets/lactose.html

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on April 28, 2010
at 12:23 AM

So, essentially no lactose in butter?

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on April 28, 2010
at 12:22 AM

Excellent work by the way, you do a great job at data mining.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on April 28, 2010
at 12:21 AM

Is the single/double cream another way of saying Half-and-half or Heavy cream?

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4 Answers

best answer

6
0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on April 27, 2010
at 11:01 PM

Protein is about 80:20 for casein:whey. All quantities per 100g. The figures are from UK foods.

Whole milk: Protein 3.3, Lactose 4.6

Whole milk yogurt: Protein 5.7, Lactose 7.8*

Cheddar cheese: Protein 24.4g**, Lactose 0.1g

Single cream/Half and half: Protein 3.3g, Lactose 9.9g

Whipping cream/Extra heavy: Protein 2.0, Lactose 2.7

Double cream: Protein 1.6g, Lactose 1.7g

Butter has about 1g of protein***.

*The yogurt probably has added milk powder.

**Almost all casein, the whey is removed in the cheese making.

***The lactose is not often measured in butter as it is very small.

You can look up more info here. http://www.milk.co.uk/page.aspx?intPageID=197

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on April 28, 2010
at 12:21 AM

Is the single/double cream another way of saying Half-and-half or Heavy cream?

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on April 28, 2010
at 12:22 AM

Excellent work by the way, you do a great job at data mining.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on April 28, 2010
at 12:23 AM

So, essentially no lactose in butter?

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on April 28, 2010
at 12:45 PM

Double cream is heavy cream I understand..

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on April 28, 2010
at 06:26 AM

One teaspoon of butter contains 0.03 grams of lactose; http://www.gastro.net.au/diets/lactose.html

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on April 28, 2010
at 09:32 AM

Made an edit for you David. There appears to be no American equivalent to UK grade double cream which is 50% fat. I didn't realise the grades were so different in the US.

0d821bf7d4028b84a6838062db0e9ce0

(754)

on April 28, 2010
at 02:22 PM

doesn't most of the lactose get eaten by the bacterial cultures in the cases of yogurt, kefir, cultured butter, buttermilk etc?

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

(1932)

on April 28, 2010
at 04:54 PM

Here's a chart that compares the various types of cream: http://whatscookingamerica.net/Sauces_Condiments/CreamDefinitions.htm In my experience in England, double cream (as least it was labeled as such) - is eaten with a spoon. That is the same as what I bought at Whole Foods called "clotted cream." So, definitions are not universal between various countries. It's all good :-)

2
6869a1f2294b3a717a53645589a91d18

(1689)

on April 28, 2010
at 05:30 AM

yogurt can have near no lactose if you ferment it 24 hr. bacteria eat up the lactose. most commercial yogurt if fermented very few hours for economic convenience.

0
2b4bef5bda7a9ba3de70468f7fa5bde8

on January 29, 2013
at 05:04 AM

Could you either revise your answer to more directly address the question or explain the numbers a bit more?

Thanks

0
C1507d5d6a7b46e0848e9c8cc54a3f46

on April 19, 2012
at 02:45 AM

The cream I've been using is 40% Heavy Cream (no idea what that means), I'm going to contact the dairy to see if they have determined the lactose content - if they care. It has 6g of fat in 1T, and shows 60cal. Which... isn't true as it would be 54 cal., since there is no other nutrient in it but fat.

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