9

votes

How much K2 is in grass fed butter?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 06, 2011 at 5:12 AM

Perhaps, my google skills fail me but I can't find an average for how much K2 is in grass-fed butter. Anyone know?

EDIT: If K2 levels are as low as they seem, is supplementation a good idea?

6864d23c49952605b2a97d6256af804d

(726)

on March 17, 2013
at 06:56 PM

Nope, no values for butter. For dairy products they find 1-10 ug/100g MK-4 for dairy products, where whole milk averages 1 and cheddar cheese averages 10.

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on April 08, 2011
at 05:18 PM

Have you tested K2 levels in any brand of ghee? My spouse's bone scan shows that his mild osteopenia has deteriorated slightly after 2 years of Paleo type eating. He has been eating ghee, for the vitamin K and keeping an eye on his vitamin D levels. He recently re-challenged butter and that is a no-go.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on March 23, 2011
at 08:28 PM

Chicken nuggets one of the best sources?! Well I never...

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on March 21, 2011
at 07:31 PM

Dr K. - It would be fascinating to know how much K2 is in each brand of butter. If KerryGold tests out with a big goose-egg, then I ain't buyin it no mo! I buy OV and Humboldt, because that's what's readily available to me, but I would love to know how much SMJOR has, and Pastureland and local brands like Trickling Springs. Oh and if you can get your hands on some Organic Pastures Raw butter, I bet it has the highest levels. If they have significantly more K2, then spending the $$ may well be worth it. Are you planning on compiling any kind of chart from the data you are obtaining?

C0887358ae041723ba426a6ad4732cfc

on March 21, 2011
at 01:11 PM

Unfortunately you did not remember the conversation that followed where it was revealed that that list is actually for total K values, not K2. Stephan: "Lee, I believe part of the vitamin K will be K1 in most if not all of those foods."

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on March 21, 2011
at 06:28 AM

Also, this dissertation looks informative, but does not answer the question...https://www.doria.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/3268/determin.pdf?sequence=1

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on March 21, 2011
at 05:44 AM

Dr K, a 1/2 lb of butter is about 225 grams. Assuming you meant 7 micrograms, and not 7 milligrams, that is about an average of 3mcg/100g -- not very impressive.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 21, 2011
at 04:57 AM

Kerry Gold had some batches with zero.....infact quite a few. Organic valley goes avgs close to 7mgs per half a lb.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on March 06, 2011
at 05:18 PM

What would you say is the average level of vitamin K2 you are finding in the butter you test? In mcg per 100 grams of butter. I would be interested to know.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 06, 2011
at 04:39 PM

I send sample monthly out for testing. Been doing it for three yrs to get a real feel for the foods and companies I advocate for to my patients. Eating well costs so I think testing matters. I think the more you see me post the more you realize I believe in feedback testing when eating paleo......once your fit then I think KGH is correct that one can just live. But getting there is in the details and that is where I totally disagree with him. If you want optimal you need to test. If you want better than most......dont test.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on March 06, 2011
at 04:16 PM

How are you testing the butter for its vitamin K2 content?

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on March 06, 2011
at 07:03 AM

isn't it crazy that it's not easy to get a level even though it's thrown around all the time as a great K2 source...

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on March 06, 2011
at 05:55 AM

i found that about 6% rda is contained in a tablespoon of conventional butter. Surely someone, somewhere has a number.

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6 Answers

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7
Eecc48184707bc26bce631485b5b7e34

on March 06, 2011
at 10:39 AM

I knew I'd stumbled across information regarding the K2 content of foods somewhere in Stephen's blog. A good 30 minutes of digging and I've finally found it. See the link for a more readable format of the listed values or better yet, head to the linked (below) german database:

http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2008/06/vitamin-k2-menatetrenone-mk-4.html

In the comments, Lee said...

"Stephen

I have been looking at the German food database, which is available in English. It is interesting since it gives values for amounts of vitamin K in a wide range of animal products.

Here is my summary of the amounts. The amounts are cals in 100g, mcg K in 100g and mcg K2 in 2000 calories of the food. Hope it makes sense.

Food 100g cal K2 K2 in 2000kcal

egg (raw)

chicken 154 48 623

duck 183 45 492

goose 179 45 503

yolk 348 147 845

cooked liver

pork 123 61 992

beef 147 81 1102

chicken 147 87 1184

veal 146 97 1329

liver pate 299 49 328

Dairy

C'bert/brie 362 35 193

cream 40% 373 40 214

milk,boiled 65 4 123

hard cheese 356 25 140

proces'd cheese 327 30 183

sour cream 10% 117 10 171

Edam 45% 354 30 169

butter 741 60 162

Meat

Corned beef 141 20 284

Salami 365 14 77

pork belly 469 8 34

beef rib 146 13 178

Ox tail 221 15 136

Other fats, offal, seafood and most meats contain none.

Lee April 30, 2009 9:25 AM"

end quoted material

C0887358ae041723ba426a6ad4732cfc

on March 21, 2011
at 01:11 PM

Unfortunately you did not remember the conversation that followed where it was revealed that that list is actually for total K values, not K2. Stephan: "Lee, I believe part of the vitamin K will be K1 in most if not all of those foods."

5
5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

on March 21, 2011
at 05:39 AM

I think you're not going to find the answer very satisfactory, but the truth is there is NOT a typical quantity of K2 in butter. It varies tremendously based on diet and soil conditions:

from Chris Masterjohn: "After analyzing over 20,000 samples of butter sent to him from around the world, however, Price found that the [vitamin K2] concentration varied 50-fold..."

FWIW, at the end of that article there is a table, with citations, listing the type and source of K2 in various foods. It shows butter as 15 mcg/100g.

4
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 06, 2011
at 02:56 PM

Butter oil is what i use when I am trying to reverse vascular calicifications and or improve osteopenia or porosis. We did do some testing on Kerry Gold butter ourselves and got real different values from the lots we bought. So I am not a big fan of theirs as I once was. Now we advocate Organic Valley who has been consistent

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 06, 2011
at 04:39 PM

I send sample monthly out for testing. Been doing it for three yrs to get a real feel for the foods and companies I advocate for to my patients. Eating well costs so I think testing matters. I think the more you see me post the more you realize I believe in feedback testing when eating paleo......once your fit then I think KGH is correct that one can just live. But getting there is in the details and that is where I totally disagree with him. If you want optimal you need to test. If you want better than most......dont test.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on March 06, 2011
at 04:16 PM

How are you testing the butter for its vitamin K2 content?

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on March 06, 2011
at 05:18 PM

What would you say is the average level of vitamin K2 you are finding in the butter you test? In mcg per 100 grams of butter. I would be interested to know.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 21, 2011
at 04:57 AM

Kerry Gold had some batches with zero.....infact quite a few. Organic valley goes avgs close to 7mgs per half a lb.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on March 21, 2011
at 07:31 PM

Dr K. - It would be fascinating to know how much K2 is in each brand of butter. If KerryGold tests out with a big goose-egg, then I ain't buyin it no mo! I buy OV and Humboldt, because that's what's readily available to me, but I would love to know how much SMJOR has, and Pastureland and local brands like Trickling Springs. Oh and if you can get your hands on some Organic Pastures Raw butter, I bet it has the highest levels. If they have significantly more K2, then spending the $$ may well be worth it. Are you planning on compiling any kind of chart from the data you are obtaining?

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on March 21, 2011
at 05:44 AM

Dr K, a 1/2 lb of butter is about 225 grams. Assuming you meant 7 micrograms, and not 7 milligrams, that is about an average of 3mcg/100g -- not very impressive.

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on April 08, 2011
at 05:18 PM

Have you tested K2 levels in any brand of ghee? My spouse's bone scan shows that his mild osteopenia has deteriorated slightly after 2 years of Paleo type eating. He has been eating ghee, for the vitamin K and keeping an eye on his vitamin D levels. He recently re-challenged butter and that is a no-go.

3
F9a0b72f38860d7601afd5a45bb53394

(3618)

on March 06, 2011
at 05:45 AM

It's not a nutrient that the food companies really track. It probably varies depending on the time of year--I would expect to see more of it in the spring and far less in the fall and winter.

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on March 06, 2011
at 05:55 AM

i found that about 6% rda is contained in a tablespoon of conventional butter. Surely someone, somewhere has a number.

2
21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on March 06, 2011
at 06:07 AM

Conventional butter in Japan has 21 mcg/100g. (Kamao 2007)

K2 levels for seemingly all other foods EXCEPT butter are given in this article

If K2 levels have indeed been measured in grass-fed butter, I might be able to find out, as the above lab is down the street from my office!

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on March 06, 2011
at 07:03 AM

isn't it crazy that it's not easy to get a level even though it's thrown around all the time as a great K2 source...

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on March 23, 2011
at 08:28 PM

Chicken nuggets one of the best sources?! Well I never...

1
21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on March 21, 2011
at 06:28 AM

This article appears to have your answer, although I can only access the abstract. I suspect the butter they test may be grass-fed, because of the nordic location. The couple studies that mentioned butter (which may be pastured or not) indicated low menaquinone levels, orders of magnitude below that of aged cheese.

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf000638u

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on March 21, 2011
at 06:28 AM

Also, this dissertation looks informative, but does not answer the question...https://www.doria.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/3268/determin.pdf?sequence=1

6864d23c49952605b2a97d6256af804d

(726)

on March 17, 2013
at 06:56 PM

Nope, no values for butter. For dairy products they find 1-10 ug/100g MK-4 for dairy products, where whole milk averages 1 and cheddar cheese averages 10.

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