2

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How insulinogenic are sour cream and mascarpone?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 12, 2011 at 2:16 PM

Hello. I've read some older threads and Mark Sisson's post yesterday on dairy, but I'm still unclear as to how sour cream and mascarpone shake out. I am trying to avoid insulinogenic dairies and would wholly embrace these otherwise delightful foods if I knew more about them. Is it safe to assume they're benign because heavy cream is benign? Same with full fat yogurt? I ask strictly from an insulin concern standpoint. Thanks so much!

5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on January 12, 2011
at 08:50 PM

I think that full-fat yogurt is still only about 4% fat leaving the other 96-ish% the same as non-fat milk. If you're avoiding milk proteins and sugars the yogurt may not be the way to go.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 12, 2011
at 08:44 PM

Ambimorph, thank you for posting about this part of the picture. :) Here is another site with a clear explanation of how to test one's on blood sugar: http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/14046889.php

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 12, 2011
at 05:36 PM

Cheshy, the yoghurt is very easy to make. If you can afford to buy a commercial yoghurt maker, I really like the Yo-Life. I bought mine from Tribest and got the extra tall cover, so that I can use my own jars. Mascarpone made with lemon juice and not straining is very easy to make, as well. I've not made sour cream or creme fraiche, as I use my yoghurt made from cream. I hope you'll give them a try. I don't know of any yoghurt made from heavy cream, which is commercially available. And store-bought mascarpone is expensive, and usually has additives. I wish you all the best.

Medium avatar

(310)

on January 12, 2011
at 04:51 PM

Thanks so much for the cool recipes! I don't know if I'm up to making them myself just yet, but I'll be sure to look for brands that use heavy whipping cream, though now that I think of it, I'm not sure what else anyone would use.

Medium avatar

(310)

on January 12, 2011
at 04:50 PM

Totally. I'm a whiz at that disappearing act too.

Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

(13635)

on January 12, 2011
at 02:27 PM

I don't have an answer for you, but items like those are on my "ok to cheat with" list. In fact, give me a spoon and I could make a barrel of mascarpone disappear in a heartbeat.

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3 Answers

4
D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

on January 12, 2011
at 02:53 PM

Yoghurt, mascarpone, and sour cream can all be made from heavy whipping cream (double cream if you are in the UK). Using heavy cream, rather than light cream or whole milk, means less lactose, which means less insulin response.

1) Here are several methods for making mascarpone cheese:

http://hubpages.com/hub/Top-5-Recipes-for-Making-Mascarpone

2) Yoghurt: just use heavy cream and make as usual. If wished, one can add gelatin granules to make it stiffer. Use as much or as little gelatin as desired. Here are simple instructions for making yoghurt: (Note on incubating: a heating pad wrapped around the jars, inside a styrofoam cooler works very well.)

ETA: The longer the yoghurt incubates, the more the lactose is reduced. I don't have a scientific reference, but read at the Specific Carbohydrate Diet site that the lactose reaches its lowest at 18 or 20 hours. (Don't remember the exact number. Their recipe is not with heavy cream, so that might change the chemical process time. Perhaps a chemist could post and tell us.)

http://www.make-stuff.com/cooking/yogurt.html

3) Sour cream: here is a link to a recipe, and also one for creme fraiche: (I apologize for the missing accent in the spelling.):

http://www.ochef.com/516.htm

Making these oneself saves money and gives one control over what is in them.

All the best to you. :)

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 12, 2011
at 05:36 PM

Cheshy, the yoghurt is very easy to make. If you can afford to buy a commercial yoghurt maker, I really like the Yo-Life. I bought mine from Tribest and got the extra tall cover, so that I can use my own jars. Mascarpone made with lemon juice and not straining is very easy to make, as well. I've not made sour cream or creme fraiche, as I use my yoghurt made from cream. I hope you'll give them a try. I don't know of any yoghurt made from heavy cream, which is commercially available. And store-bought mascarpone is expensive, and usually has additives. I wish you all the best.

Medium avatar

(310)

on January 12, 2011
at 04:51 PM

Thanks so much for the cool recipes! I don't know if I'm up to making them myself just yet, but I'll be sure to look for brands that use heavy whipping cream, though now that I think of it, I'm not sure what else anyone would use.

3
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 12, 2011
at 06:48 PM

before, after learning that dairy products are insulinogenic i would have probably tried to avoid them as a metabolic plague but now after reading a series of articles about insulin on "weightology" and "carbsanity" blogs i would say: yes, they are insulunogenic indeed, but so what? it's not the insulin per se that makes you fat, sick or whatever, it's the overall metabolic context (consisting of calorie intake, macro ratio, meal timing, activity level, and myriads of other factors ) that really matters

2
100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on January 12, 2011
at 08:37 PM

I think the best way to determine your own response to specific foods is to get a blood glucose monitor and test yourself. Of course that won't tell you directly about insulin, but it should tell you how your body is responding.

See The Healthy Skeptic for cheap, easy instructions.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 12, 2011
at 08:44 PM

Ambimorph, thank you for posting about this part of the picture. :) Here is another site with a clear explanation of how to test one's on blood sugar: http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/14046889.php

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