2

votes

How do you explain why Whole Milk is Better than SKim Milk to a non-Paleo?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 13, 2011 at 12:28 PM

The title should be self-explanatory.

I'm trying to get my GF to buy whole milk for the house. Brought up on the normal "Skim Milk is healthy, whole milk isn't" mantra, she's convinced skim milk is the best. Although I've introduced other paleo elements to her that have improved her life (she's now eating very little bread - and feels great!), I'm having difficulty convincing her of this.

Is there a good URL or web page arguing for this? Or anyone here can make one? :)

morgan

3c49f67b3c8c0b580e89fdba0b95a8e8

(211)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

I have the same problem as the OP. I don't drink milk, my husband doesn't eat Paleo and one of my kids loves anything dairy. Milk, though, is the least of my battles-lol.

Daf56fdc7582cca0f7f3b2ad6a5be798

(114)

on July 09, 2012
at 06:57 PM

Fat soluble vitamins do need dietary fat to be absorbed properly. They are called fat soluble because they dissolve into fat which carries them through the digestive system to be absorbed into the small intestine. This is why people with fat absorption problems often have vitamin deficiencies. You may not need the additional fat in the milk if you are getting the fat elsewhere however.

98d897c716fab334d015b8004ed0537f

(639)

on July 09, 2012
at 05:39 PM

Whether or not extra is added, if you have the same volume of skim and whole milk the skim would have more sugar since you've removed the fat which was displacing it.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on July 09, 2012
at 05:21 PM

Skim milk is pig food on a traditional farm! Not feeding it to humans isn't the same as wasting it. But I agree that probably isn't a good commercial solution for the mega-dairies.

4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on July 09, 2012
at 03:47 PM

Yeah, the gallon of (whole) milk a day protocol is notorious with weight lifters for adding pounds. If you're doing a lifting program, a lot of those pounds will be muscle. If not...

4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on July 09, 2012
at 03:39 PM

It makes perfect sense. If a cup of whole milk has a certain percentage of fat in it, and you take the fat away, then a cup of the remainder will be full of what's left, therefore increasing the percentage of everything else.

A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

(3761)

on February 13, 2012
at 01:59 PM

Sugar is added to skim milk for taste.

62442eec80b7d248ccfa08f98f736748

on February 11, 2012
at 11:35 PM

Although there actually is no difference in sugar...skim milk is literally whole milk skimmed of its fat. sugar content is unaffected.

0ee98c251b5eef357445aefec99c5d7b

(888)

on February 11, 2012
at 01:10 PM

Facepalmed myself reading that last sentence

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on May 15, 2011
at 01:59 PM

Why would the removal of fat increase protein and carbohydrate content ? I see it too, it just doesn't make any sense.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on May 15, 2011
at 01:59 PM

But what are the difference in insulin spikes between full fat, 3.2% (regular), 1.3% (light) or 0% (non fat) ? Are there any studies that focus on insulin spikes and casein/lactose content ?

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 15, 2011
at 01:45 PM

gotta pick em wisely right.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 15, 2011
at 05:06 AM

ETDF people! like my-skinny-until-death (at 90 some from catching pneumonia from falling down on the cold floor) 12-child-bearing-great-grandmother (yup 12 kids) always said with a probable sneer when questioned about her love of fatty fat fat fat "you don't know what's good for you". Then she probably went on to ranting about how she didn't believe in an afterlife, much to the dismay of many priests. No wonder my handsome great grandpa found her so beguiling. She may not have believed in an afterlife but she lives on in my love of butter.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 15, 2011
at 04:55 AM

well, aside from arguing I will remain skinnier and healthier by continuing to eat my full fat dairy, your acronym for 'eat the damn fat', ETDF, made me laugh out loud and dammit, I can always use a good laugh, ICAUAGL!

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 15, 2011
at 12:32 AM

Agreed. Well put.

3c49f67b3c8c0b580e89fdba0b95a8e8

(211)

on May 14, 2011
at 02:10 PM

i don't think the OP mentioned context, if she is talking about the whole house, we can assume that her children aren't taking their milk with their coffee-lol. i personally, don't tolerate dairy, and I think that it's a problem for many who don't even know it. the op asked for an easy way to explain why whole is better, not whether it should be consumed, i gave her another option. and, I wouldn't recommend eating insulin spiking foods to someone just because they aren't obese. insulin not only affects fat storage, you know...

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 14, 2011
at 01:03 PM

and? the context within the which the milk, skimmed or otherwise, should be taken into account. If its a bit here and there in tea and coffee, for example, that small amount is going to do nothing to insulin levels. Also, assuming the OP is not obese and their kids arent either, so what if their skimmed milk spikes insulin? Thats a natural result from consuming sugar. Its not a problem, its wholly what is supposed to happen.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on May 13, 2011
at 06:49 PM

Dave but since skim is not 0%, vitamins are still absorbed IMO. Do we got any numbers on vitamin/fat absorbition.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 13, 2011
at 05:08 PM

Good for you. Saying its OK to consume skimmed milk is not the same as condemning dietary fat as a whole, as conventional wisdom does. Im assuming the OP is feeding their kids well, paleoish, with good amounts of fat from animals. If thats the case, then skimming fat off milk is in NO WAY going to be detrimental to health. In learning to appreciate fat people automatically think that fat must be eaten in huge quantities and had all the time with everything. not the case at all. You'll get plenty from meat, and cooking (coconut) oil.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 13, 2011
at 05:05 PM

if its storebought pasteurized milk the CLA is not a factor. Additionally if the person is using the milk as a condiment like i mentioned then the minor amounts of ADEandK are not an issue. Its prolly fortified with artificial vitamins anyhow. i mentioned how fat is important for vitamin delivery but as long as there is other fat in the diet, which im assuming there is, skimming fat off milk is not going to be an issue. Some milk has dried milk added to it, some doesn't. you have to read labels to find out.

75651d0e0c42f9a408ccb027e4b157e7

(10)

on May 13, 2011
at 04:01 PM

i've read that another problem with skim milk is that it is fortified with dried milk solids (to make it seem creamier) which become oxidized while undergoing processing.

7792d8e2ada34662a3226a7d1952940a

(900)

on May 13, 2011
at 03:50 PM

The original reason, and what happened was exactly what I said. To lean them out a bit and cut some body fat and that happened. So how would going to whole make you healthier and leaner than staying on skim? I agree with Ben for myself, but kids need to be guided in their decisions in life, not forced. I have educated them in the differences, and they choose what they like better. Skim milk made them lose baby fat, so they like it better when they have it.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on May 13, 2011
at 03:42 PM

After completely exonerating saturated fat, he states: "Try to limit it to about ten percent of daily calories." Can you feel the roar of cognitive dissonance?

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on May 13, 2011
at 03:36 PM

Dairy has fat soluble vitamins A, D, E & K. They cannot be absorbed/utilized without the fat. All the nutrition in dairy is in the fat, the vitamins, CLA etc. Skim milk is white colored sugar water.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 13, 2011
at 02:21 PM

i'm not advocating fat-phobia by the way. I'm just thinking about the use of the milk: its prolly in coffee, etc. Prolly not chugging it down like an actual food, right? If so, the presence or lack of fat is not a big "health" deal, per se. If you're whole diet is milk-based then yes I'd say full fat is wise since it'll get you better vitamin-delivery, etc. But, as im presuming admittedly, if its a supplemental part of your eating anyway, who cares if its got a bit of fat in it or its been skimmed to be more like 2%, 1%, or even, though its disgusting, 0%:)

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 13, 2011
at 02:17 PM

how would whole milk be better than skim milk? Its dairy either way, which causes issues for lots of people. Additionally whole milk presents a simple caloric issue for many people, especially SAD people. if one's diet is near its caloric limit than limiting a source of fat that is relatively easily moderated is wise, no? If one's goals are leanness and they don't want to take out some other part of the eating plan.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 13, 2011
at 02:02 PM

i like this answer. I'm an over two-year strict paleo-eater but i don't see skim milk as any less healthy than full-fat. Merely taking some of the fat off of the original milk DOES NOT make it instantaneously less healthy in any way. Firstly, I'd avoid dairy wholly, but if you wanna do dairy and just wanna moderate your cals for, say, leaning out in the summer months, etc, then I see nothing wrong with watching one's intake of fat, which is calorically dense. In fact, I'd argue that it might show a good understanding of the macronutrients as tools we can use for whatever goal we might have.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on May 13, 2011
at 02:01 PM

What a great article! I had not seen that. That first paragraph will blow a lot of people away.

Ce238498df04185f7f45d15f4b8ea501

(35)

on May 13, 2011
at 01:34 PM

I'm sorry but I couldnt figure this out. Why would you want them to continue drinking skimmed milk?

91c2e2a35e578e2e79ce7d631b753879

(2081)

on May 13, 2011
at 01:28 PM

EXCELLENT suggestion.

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23 Answers

7
D3ff004d4a0c42b67cc2c49a5ee9c0f3

(5801)

on May 13, 2011
at 01:06 PM

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on May 13, 2011
at 02:01 PM

What a great article! I had not seen that. That first paragraph will blow a lot of people away.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on May 13, 2011
at 03:42 PM

After completely exonerating saturated fat, he states: "Try to limit it to about ten percent of daily calories." Can you feel the roar of cognitive dissonance?

91c2e2a35e578e2e79ce7d631b753879

(2081)

on May 13, 2011
at 01:28 PM

EXCELLENT suggestion.

0ee98c251b5eef357445aefec99c5d7b

(888)

on February 11, 2012
at 01:10 PM

Facepalmed myself reading that last sentence

5
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on May 13, 2011
at 01:08 PM

As others have noted, your simple point is the crux of the "fat is bad" debate. Reading the book "Nourishing Traditions" should give you some "talking points".

You can Google on the phrase "low fat debacle" to get more info.

Another thing to point out is that skim milk is a waste product in dairy production. Products that require cream are produced by extracting the cream from the milk and the leftover is "skimmed" or "skim" milk. This watery residue is not really fit for consumption nor nutritious. In order to sell it (i.e. get rid of it and make money at the same time), they process this by adding back cream and fortifying it with enough vitamins to be worthwhile.

There is a book by Theodor Koller titled "The utilization of waste products" which describes how skim milk is produced and sold. The title alone should have some impact on avid skim milk drinkers.

Incidentally, soy milk is in the same category -- it is the waste product from producting tofu and other soybean related products. They used to throw it away, but then figured out a way to process it so that it looked kind of like milk, and now they sell it.

The best way to fatten up your livestock is to give them large quantities of low-quality feed...

4
Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on May 15, 2011
at 04:27 AM

I love how everyone has good contributions like that saturated fats are good and that whole fat dairy is more nutritious. Good thread so far. I will add that dairy fat is the best sorce of trans-palmitoleic acid which has insulin-sensitizing properties. It's seriously good for you, so that's one big reason to eat the damn fat (ETDF).

http://www.annals.org/content/153/12/790.short?rss=1

In multivariate analyses, whole-fat dairy consumption was most strongly associated with higher trans-palmitoleate levels. Higher trans-palmitoleate levels were associated with slightly lower adiposity and, independently, with higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (1.9% across quintiles; P = 0.040), lower triglyceride levels (???19.0%; P < 0.001), a lower total cholesterol???HDL cholesterol ratio (???4.7%; P < 0.001), lower C-reactive protein levels (???13.8%; P = 0.05), and lower insulin resistance (???16.7%, P < 0.001). Trans-palmitoleate was also associated with a substantially lower incidence of diabetes, with multivariate hazard ratios of 0.41 (95% CI, 0.27 to 0.64) and 0.38 (CI, 0.24 to 0.62) in quintiles 4 and 5 versus quintile 1 (P for trend < 0.001). Findings were independent of estimated dairy consumption or other fatty acid dairy biomarkers. Protective associations with metabolic risk factors were confirmed in the validation cohort.

I'm not entirely sure of the mechanism but that is one powerful statistic on circulating levels. Dairy fat is associated with higher levels, higher levels are strongly associated with better metabolic health. Good enough for me.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 15, 2011
at 04:55 AM

well, aside from arguing I will remain skinnier and healthier by continuing to eat my full fat dairy, your acronym for 'eat the damn fat', ETDF, made me laugh out loud and dammit, I can always use a good laugh, ICAUAGL!

Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 15, 2011
at 05:06 AM

ETDF people! like my-skinny-until-death (at 90 some from catching pneumonia from falling down on the cold floor) 12-child-bearing-great-grandmother (yup 12 kids) always said with a probable sneer when questioned about her love of fatty fat fat fat "you don't know what's good for you". Then she probably went on to ranting about how she didn't believe in an afterlife, much to the dismay of many priests. No wonder my handsome great grandpa found her so beguiling. She may not have believed in an afterlife but she lives on in my love of butter.

4
B7fec4bf394de8dfa6403067aea94e1b

on May 13, 2011
at 12:50 PM

Milk comes out of the cow with fat in it - that's the way it is naturally. As a person who is lactose-intolerant, I can definitely say that no, it's not better for you unless you think blasting your colon is healthy.

A cup of whole milk has less sugar in it because there is more fat in it. If you drink a cup of skim milk, you're drinking more diarrhea-inducing lactose per cup without the benefits of the fat in whole milk.

4
A0b8c4cc369f93ee987ce15b1bf323fe

on May 13, 2011
at 12:49 PM

The argument isn't limited to whole vs skim milk. Once she understands the falsity of 'low-fat' approaches to nutrition, it will fall into place that whole milk is better than skim. So you might want to start by helping her learn about why fat ISN'T the enemy... i.e. Taubes, Harris, etc.

3
A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

(3761)

on May 13, 2011
at 12:50 PM

I don't know how great your friend will find my argument, but it worked for some members of my family. Generally, non-paleos seem to recognize that sugar is bad for you. So, I just explain that skim has more sugar and that seems to do the trick! Not to mention the taste of whole milk is SO much better!

A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

(3761)

on February 13, 2012
at 01:59 PM

Sugar is added to skim milk for taste.

62442eec80b7d248ccfa08f98f736748

on February 11, 2012
at 11:35 PM

Although there actually is no difference in sugar...skim milk is literally whole milk skimmed of its fat. sugar content is unaffected.

98d897c716fab334d015b8004ed0537f

(639)

on July 09, 2012
at 05:39 PM

Whether or not extra is added, if you have the same volume of skim and whole milk the skim would have more sugar since you've removed the fat which was displacing it.

2
8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

on May 19, 2011
at 07:40 PM

http://shine.yahoo.com/channel/food/is-skim-milk-making-you-fat-2479492/ I like this article: skim milk is produced by oxidizing the cholesterol in it. In animal studies oxidized cholesterol causes heart disease and is carcinogenic. Also weight loss was better with full-fat dairy low-fat dairy was associated with overweight, obese children.

Full-fat dairy has the large, fluffy LDL (pattern A) which is NOT implicated in heart disease (Gary Taubes - Why We Get Fat, Good Calories/Bad Calories and Fathead movie). Pattern B is the small, dense LDL associated with heart disease.You can only have Pattern A or B NOT both is my understanding.

Pattern A: low triglycerides, low VLDL, large fluffy LDL, high HDL - all heart healthy/protective

Pattern B: high triglycerides, high VLDL, small dense LDL, low HDL - all heart disease producing

A lot of labs/doctors don't distinguish between large fluffy vs. small dense types of LDL which is why I look at triglycerides and HDL - a much better indicator. Also you will either fit into Pattern A or B so I think you can figure out which LDL (small-dense dangerous ones vs. large fluffy benign) you are producing by levels of HDL and triglycerides.

There's more on insulin, glucagon, VLDL and the like in this article. A bit technical, but still a good read: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low-density_lipoprotein

2
Medium avatar

(5136)

on May 14, 2011
at 01:52 PM

there were recent studies that showed likelihood that all milk except for full fat milk aggravated prostate cancer in men.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2008/01/02/us-nonfat-cancer-idUSHAR26781420080102

"In an overall analysis of food groups, the consumption of dairy products and milk were not associated with prostate cancer risk, the authors found. Further analysis, however, suggested that low-fat or nonfat milk did increase the risk of localized tumors or non-aggressive tumors, while whole milk decreased this risk."

Of course she's a she not a he, but if she buys it "for the house" then maybe others drink it and of course it may affect other cancers this way. I'm also with Matthew when he says if there were no skim milk, there'd be no cream and it seems a waste for no one to use it, but maybe drinking it isn't the best use.

2
0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on May 14, 2011
at 01:04 PM

If there was no skim milk then there would be no cream.

I'm just saying that cream is a result of making skim milk, litterally skimming the fat of the top of the milk. It is rather a waste if no one uses all the leftover skim milk.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on July 09, 2012
at 05:21 PM

Skim milk is pig food on a traditional farm! Not feeding it to humans isn't the same as wasting it. But I agree that probably isn't a good commercial solution for the mega-dairies.

2
7792d8e2ada34662a3226a7d1952940a

on May 13, 2011
at 01:06 PM

My only question is this. Prior to my paleo adventure, we switched our kids from whole to 1% milk. Both of them leaned out, and there is a 4 year age difference between them. This was the only change we did to their diets and it took about 2 months. No diarrheal issues to credit the fat loss, no major growth spurts. They still drink 1% today when they do have milk, so I am hesitant about swapping back up to the unleaded stuff.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 13, 2011
at 02:02 PM

i like this answer. I'm an over two-year strict paleo-eater but i don't see skim milk as any less healthy than full-fat. Merely taking some of the fat off of the original milk DOES NOT make it instantaneously less healthy in any way. Firstly, I'd avoid dairy wholly, but if you wanna do dairy and just wanna moderate your cals for, say, leaning out in the summer months, etc, then I see nothing wrong with watching one's intake of fat, which is calorically dense. In fact, I'd argue that it might show a good understanding of the macronutrients as tools we can use for whatever goal we might have.

7792d8e2ada34662a3226a7d1952940a

(900)

on May 13, 2011
at 03:50 PM

The original reason, and what happened was exactly what I said. To lean them out a bit and cut some body fat and that happened. So how would going to whole make you healthier and leaner than staying on skim? I agree with Ben for myself, but kids need to be guided in their decisions in life, not forced. I have educated them in the differences, and they choose what they like better. Skim milk made them lose baby fat, so they like it better when they have it.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 13, 2011
at 05:08 PM

Good for you. Saying its OK to consume skimmed milk is not the same as condemning dietary fat as a whole, as conventional wisdom does. Im assuming the OP is feeding their kids well, paleoish, with good amounts of fat from animals. If thats the case, then skimming fat off milk is in NO WAY going to be detrimental to health. In learning to appreciate fat people automatically think that fat must be eaten in huge quantities and had all the time with everything. not the case at all. You'll get plenty from meat, and cooking (coconut) oil.

Ce238498df04185f7f45d15f4b8ea501

(35)

on May 13, 2011
at 01:34 PM

I'm sorry but I couldnt figure this out. Why would you want them to continue drinking skimmed milk?

1
1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

on July 09, 2012
at 03:34 PM

If its from grain fed cows, no fat milk wins hands down. If you want to get fatter everyday, do like a poster above does and drink 2 liters of whole milk a day (on top of the food that OF COURSE your still going to consume).

4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on July 09, 2012
at 03:47 PM

Yeah, the gallon of (whole) milk a day protocol is notorious with weight lifters for adding pounds. If you're doing a lifting program, a lot of those pounds will be muscle. If not...

1
99af5cdd87bd2ed000a33fb7e23293d7

on July 09, 2012
at 03:25 PM

Whoa! Fat soluble vitamins don't need fat in order to be digested. Skim milk has vitamins A and D, just like whole milk does. Fat soluble vitamins are called that because your body stores them in fat (and in the liver), not because you need to consume them in fat to benefit from them. So much misinformation out there.

Also, skim milk has more lactose because it contains more non-fat solids per serving than whole or 2% due to the process of removing the fat, and replacing it with addition non-fat milk to make up the same volume. The difference, by the way, is quite insignificant, such that looking at the nutritional facts on a carton shows no difference between the butterfats, on sugars.

Dr. Oz, by the way, is an entertainer and mis-informer, whose goal is to sell more books, and more advertising on his show. Watch it for entertainment, DO NOT watch it for lifestyle choices.

Daf56fdc7582cca0f7f3b2ad6a5be798

(114)

on July 09, 2012
at 06:57 PM

Fat soluble vitamins do need dietary fat to be absorbed properly. They are called fat soluble because they dissolve into fat which carries them through the digestive system to be absorbed into the small intestine. This is why people with fat absorption problems often have vitamin deficiencies. You may not need the additional fat in the milk if you are getting the fat elsewhere however.

1
24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on February 11, 2012
at 11:11 PM

Start with a compromise: 2% that's more than half the fat of whole milk.

Skim milk contains only slightly more casein or lactose, nothing that would make any difference. I have no use for it, even back in my LF days. But 2% is a nice compromise.

If you feel you need more milk fat, eat butter ;)

1
4e6eb64e86d5373f8fb12ea8058b0e3a

on February 11, 2012
at 11:53 AM

GYDAY;

i dink full fat organic unhomogenised grass fed cows milk.....

sometimes 2 litres a day.....

im as strong as an ox..lean and athletic at 45....i had my doubts after being dairy free for 3 years....but after a hard days work the full fat milk just helps my body recover like nothing else......

true..i would be leaner without it....but big deal....i would also be weaker and more tired.....

the massai eat meat and drink full fat milk and blood....you reckon they arent paleo/primal.....

i dont eat any grains or legumes....i just am paleo with the exception of the full fat unhomogenised organic milk...

and its sublime....

1
Medium avatar

on May 15, 2011
at 03:34 AM

Full fat dairy has a higher concentration of fat, therefore lower concentration of lactose and casein, the two bad things in dairy.

Here is more info from Stephan Guyanet's blog:

http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2010/04/full-fat-dairy-for-cardiovascular.html

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on May 15, 2011
at 01:59 PM

Why would the removal of fat increase protein and carbohydrate content ? I see it too, it just doesn't make any sense.

4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on July 09, 2012
at 03:39 PM

It makes perfect sense. If a cup of whole milk has a certain percentage of fat in it, and you take the fat away, then a cup of the remainder will be full of what's left, therefore increasing the percentage of everything else.

1
Ce238498df04185f7f45d15f4b8ea501

on May 13, 2011
at 12:49 PM

If you've convinced her about fats, then thats the message you should use to make her shift to whole milk. After all, what is skimmed milk but whole milk minus the fat

0
4886d3390cb1de913ecc198e72cc072c

on July 09, 2012
at 05:35 PM

Here's a great chart that compares Raw Milk vs Conventional milk from Organic Pastures. I send this to my friends when they don't want to hear what's really in conventional milk: http://organicpastures.com/whyraw.html

0
6f2c00fcbf48c69f0ea212239b3e1178

on May 14, 2011
at 05:34 PM

fat isn't evil + processing usually makes it worse

0
Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7314)

on May 14, 2011
at 04:34 PM

If the fat is grassfed, then it is definitely better. CLA,for example, inhibits IGF-1. It will also have fat soluble nutrients. If the fat isn't grassfed, then I would probably just not eat the product because it has all the potentially harmful things like casein and lactose, and not much of the good stuff.

I would explain it just as whole milk is a real food and is in its natural state. Since dairy fat isn't bad for you, why take it off? (If the argument is for calories, why not just skip the product entirely?)

0
3c49f67b3c8c0b580e89fdba0b95a8e8

on May 14, 2011
at 12:59 PM

When you take the fat out of whole milk, you are essentially increasing the percentage of sugar in it which makes it more insulin spiking.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 15, 2011
at 12:32 AM

Agreed. Well put.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 14, 2011
at 01:03 PM

and? the context within the which the milk, skimmed or otherwise, should be taken into account. If its a bit here and there in tea and coffee, for example, that small amount is going to do nothing to insulin levels. Also, assuming the OP is not obese and their kids arent either, so what if their skimmed milk spikes insulin? Thats a natural result from consuming sugar. Its not a problem, its wholly what is supposed to happen.

3c49f67b3c8c0b580e89fdba0b95a8e8

(211)

on May 14, 2011
at 02:10 PM

i don't think the OP mentioned context, if she is talking about the whole house, we can assume that her children aren't taking their milk with their coffee-lol. i personally, don't tolerate dairy, and I think that it's a problem for many who don't even know it. the op asked for an easy way to explain why whole is better, not whether it should be consumed, i gave her another option. and, I wouldn't recommend eating insulin spiking foods to someone just because they aren't obese. insulin not only affects fat storage, you know...

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 15, 2011
at 01:45 PM

gotta pick em wisely right.

3c49f67b3c8c0b580e89fdba0b95a8e8

(211)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

I have the same problem as the OP. I don't drink milk, my husband doesn't eat Paleo and one of my kids loves anything dairy. Milk, though, is the least of my battles-lol.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on May 15, 2011
at 01:59 PM

But what are the difference in insulin spikes between full fat, 3.2% (regular), 1.3% (light) or 0% (non fat) ? Are there any studies that focus on insulin spikes and casein/lactose content ?

0
62f354c72aae8bd8f641ada886d583a2

on May 13, 2011
at 02:30 PM

I learned that whole dairy was better from Nourishing Traditions and WAPF. Before that I was a low fat believer. There are a lot of great bloggers who deal with this topic she could read if the book is too much. In general maybe she should learn more about the real food movement and that might push her to get foods that are the least processed.

0
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on May 13, 2011
at 01:38 PM

You could try Nina Planck's book, Real Food.

0
35e09dae32de43af73b3bffaff5636fe

(103)

on May 13, 2011
at 12:58 PM

*show videos on fat cows in milkindustry and how they suffer

*explain that cows who eat grass have more fatsoluble vitamins and that this are make us strong

*maybe she understand that milk loose its vitamis when more processed. Raw milk ist best, grass fed, organic, not pasturized and never homogenizid or more proccessing.

h

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