5

votes

Gluten causing lactose intolerance?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 02, 2012 at 3:20 AM

Back in 2004 I was self diagnosed with Lactose intolerance. I was bad enough off that even a chocolate bar would set off my lactose intolerance. Last year I found out (like most everyone else) that I am gluten intolerant. I did a little digging around and found there could be a link between gluten intolerance and lactose intolerance. Since it has been nearly 3 months since my last gluten slip up, I decided to down some dairy and test this hypothesis. Low and behold, after my typical 40 min post dairy consumption threshold, I did not exhibit any of the lactose intolerance symptoms. I plan on repeating this experiment again in the near future to see if it was a fluke. But for right now, it stands to reason that my lactose intolerance could have truly just been gluten effing up my insides.

Has anyone else noticed this as well?

7ac8e67cfe1d5baae4124f1f807180f5

on April 03, 2012
at 12:26 AM

There might even be research out there. I'll take a peek when I get some free time.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 02, 2012
at 11:47 PM

+1 but still 15 minutes before I get to up-vote. :-))

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 02, 2012
at 11:46 PM

"I wonder if these same groups aren't just more sensitive to gluten!" I've asked that question, because my chronic (now known to be wheat-related) symptoms appeared in childhood and I never handled dairy well. For me it's a "chicken or egg" question but research would be interesting, wouldn't it?

65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on April 02, 2012
at 02:50 PM

The article is specific to celiacs however if you are gluten intolerant there is a correlation between your digestion & absorption which shouldn't be overlooked.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on April 02, 2012
at 05:08 AM

I think that article is you posted is explaining why there is a connection between celiac disease and lactose intolerance, not gluten intolerance and lactose intolerance.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 02, 2012
at 03:34 AM

Yeah, sorry but as it stands this is not a question--you could add, "Has anyone else noticed ..."(Hint: I have)

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on April 02, 2012
at 03:32 AM

You need to edit and turn it into a question or it will be deleted. Maybe you can ask if others have had similar experiences?

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5 Answers

2
7ac8e67cfe1d5baae4124f1f807180f5

on April 02, 2012
at 11:41 PM

Absolutely, as a matter of fact, gluten, gliadin, and host of other "goodies" found in wheat actually damage the small intestine cells that make the enzyme that digests lactose (called lactase).

Its very common to see the return of these cells to normal function after 8 to 12 weeks without gluten.

Keep in mind there is also a genetic association with lower lactase production in several different ethnic groups. Of course, I wonder if these same groups aren't just more sensitive to gluten!

-Shawn Soszka, ND, LAc

7ac8e67cfe1d5baae4124f1f807180f5

on April 03, 2012
at 12:26 AM

There might even be research out there. I'll take a peek when I get some free time.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 02, 2012
at 11:47 PM

+1 but still 15 minutes before I get to up-vote. :-))

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 02, 2012
at 11:46 PM

"I wonder if these same groups aren't just more sensitive to gluten!" I've asked that question, because my chronic (now known to be wheat-related) symptoms appeared in childhood and I never handled dairy well. For me it's a "chicken or egg" question but research would be interesting, wouldn't it?

2
65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on April 02, 2012
at 03:49 AM

Here is a great article that explains why there is often a connection between the two. In summary, intestinal linings damaged by gluten can heal once gluten is eliminated. Once healed, sometimes lactose can be reintroduced.

http://www.celiac.com/articles/31/1/How-is-lactose-intolerance-related-to-celiac-disease/Page1.html

65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on April 02, 2012
at 02:50 PM

The article is specific to celiacs however if you are gluten intolerant there is a correlation between your digestion & absorption which shouldn't be overlooked.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on April 02, 2012
at 05:08 AM

I think that article is you posted is explaining why there is a connection between celiac disease and lactose intolerance, not gluten intolerance and lactose intolerance.

1
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 02, 2012
at 03:52 AM

Yes, I was convinced I was lactose intolerant at the time I changed to this lifestyle. I didn't know at that time that my true intolerance was to wheat.

A few months later, in August 2011, I had an aha moment when a wheat binge caused bad reactions. In the fall I started drinking water kefir and shortly thereafter found I no longer had a problem with yogurt, which used to make me feel sick instantly. I now make extra-fat yogurt at home and enjoy some every other day and have also had ice cream several times without difficulty.

With continued gut healing, for which I give water kefir lots of credit, I can now even splurge on wheat once in a while without any reaction. So far, too much repetition starts to trigger GERD so I'm not pretending I can resume "normal" wheat consumption but I'm pleased with the much-improved health of my gut.

0
2a00b9a42e4cb6e489a0e69d20714576

on April 02, 2012
at 10:31 AM

Suffice to say, they go hand in hand.

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