3

votes

Does fermentation negate the effects of pasteurization and homogenization (when making yogurt)?

Commented on January 21, 2013
Created September 07, 2013 at 12:44 AM

The easy solution would be to buy grass-fed raw milk.

However, if we make yogurt using pasteurized, homogenized milk, are there any risks associated with this? (Oxidized cholesterol, denatured proteins...etc etc).

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on January 21, 2013
at 12:51 PM

I would love to know that three ;)

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on January 17, 2013
at 05:47 PM

Say what, thhq?

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on January 17, 2013
at 12:59 AM

Damn thhq, do you smoke a cigarette with that meal too?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 16, 2013
at 09:06 PM

I cannot make a proper egg cheese without bringing the egg/buttermilk/milk mixture to a simmer, which causes curds to form. If I were a rawist, I would eat my eggs and milk uncooked. But I'm not, and am quite willing to settle for the 15 second reduction in lifespan that MIGHT result from cooking.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 16, 2013
at 09:00 PM

Raw milk is dead too.

Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

(4319)

on November 09, 2012
at 08:23 AM

I would love to know that too :)

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on November 08, 2012
at 09:40 PM

I would love to know that too!

  • Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

    asked by

    (3700)
  • Views
    9.6K
  • Last Activity
    1854D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

4 Answers

best answer

0
Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on January 16, 2013
at 08:28 PM

Fermentation takes a dead (pasteurized) food and turns it back into a living food (teeming with good bacteria). So in that sense, it is beneficial. It won't bring back all the live enzymes (like lactase) and whatever immunoglobulins in raw milk that are destroyed by the heat of pasteurization, so it's not going to "reverse" the pasteurization, but at least it does inject some life back into an otherwise dead product.

As for the homogenization, I can't see how fermentation would affect that at all. No mechanism I can think of where the live bacteria would cause the fat particles to recombine into larger droplets that can separate out from the rest of the milk like happens in raw or unhomogenized milk.

If someone was going to make homemade fermented dairy products and didn't have access to a good source of clean, raw milk, second best is probably organic, low-temp pasteurized, non-homogenized ("cream top") milk. Next would probably be non-homogenized regular (non organic) milk.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on January 17, 2013
at 05:47 PM

Say what, thhq?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 16, 2013
at 09:00 PM

Raw milk is dead too.

0
Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 16, 2013
at 09:00 PM

No. It only changes a part of the milk sugar lactose to lactic acid through the action of the enzyme lactase. Homogenization is a mechanical fat emulsification process. Heat treatment, whether pasteurization or scalding, denatures the protein (casein and whey) - not much different than what happens when you cook meat.

0
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on January 16, 2013
at 07:59 PM

One of the negative effects of pasteurization is, in my opinion, a reduction of glutathione boosting compounds like the dipeptide glutamylcysteine via protein hydrolysis and denaturation.

Fermentive bacteria do seem to be able to produce glutathione and glutamyl cysteine though, and consuming fermenting dairy appears to bring about greater increases in glutathione than unfermeted dairy products (3,4,5).

Based on the limited existing research on this topic it's hard to say which, if either, is better at boosting glutathione levels, but both appear to better than unfermented, pasteurized dairy.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on January 17, 2013
at 12:59 AM

Damn thhq, do you smoke a cigarette with that meal too?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 16, 2013
at 09:06 PM

I cannot make a proper egg cheese without bringing the egg/buttermilk/milk mixture to a simmer, which causes curds to form. If I were a rawist, I would eat my eggs and milk uncooked. But I'm not, and am quite willing to settle for the 15 second reduction in lifespan that MIGHT result from cooking.

0
Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

on January 16, 2013
at 07:07 PM

Fermentation of yoghurt relates the bacteria feeding on the sugars, thereby making the end product relatively digestible for someone who is lactose intolerant. I can't see how protein being denatured would make much of a difference to this process, same for cholesterol (anyway I'm udner the impression that it's milk solids that may have the oxidisation cholsterol... If you're making your own yoghurt from whole milk (even if is patuerised, I don't know what the problem would be...

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!