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Conventional Heavy Cream and Butter bother my stomach - why?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 03, 2011 at 3:52 AM

I've noticed that good quality butters like Kerrygold or cultured butter) and clarified butter don't bother me; but yogurt (even goat yogurt), regular cheese, and even heavy cream upset my stomach and give me gas problems. I thought that butter and heavy cream were generally considered to be "safe dairy" for those who have problems with dairy. What could be in it that gives me these problems? Keep in mind that I'm talking about conventional sources of dairy.

76211ec5301087de2588cfe3d6bccba9

(1178)

on September 04, 2012
at 07:05 PM

i have never thought i was lactose intolerant

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 03, 2011
at 05:14 AM

Could you be lactose intolerant? My sympathies. I love whipped cream!

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3 Answers

2
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on May 03, 2011
at 05:37 AM

"Conventional" dairy products have been pasteurized and homogenized, which significantly changes their make-up. Pasteurized milk putrefies, but raw milk never does (it gets sour, but is still consumable, even after a couple of weeks). In fact, most of the milk-consuming world drinks milk that has been soured in some way (yogurt, kefir, etc).

Many people who have a problem digesting conventional dairy products have much better luck with raw milk, which is thought to contain more emzymes and lack whatever putrefies supermarket milk. Maybe you are borderline lactose intolerant, or zimply human and in need of wholesome dairy foods :-)

0
C074eec3b3c0325ef3018a128111823a

(1012)

on May 03, 2011
at 10:37 AM

Butter is basically fat and milk solids, with remarkably little lactose. Cultured butter, even less, because the culture consumes lactose.

If you're curious and willing to try an experiment, and can find it (or feel like making it yourself), it would be interesting to see how well you tolerate yoghurt (or kefir) that has been fully cultured. This is something that has been allowed to grow at least 24h and again, has used up basically all of the lactose. Chris Kresser talked about this in a podcast I listened to recently, possible the geekfest 3-way with the Kraken and the Wolf.

Also, again if you want to experiment, try and source some unpasturised milk that still contains lactase, and see if you tolerate that better.

Both of these are aimed at learning about what actually makes you tick, or ick. In practice, though, it probably just means you avoid dairy other than the butter/ghee you already are happy with.

0
Ffc7e0ecad8e8831b528c5d4921377cc

(942)

on May 03, 2011
at 05:33 AM

No doubt there are degrees of lactose intolerance. You probably don't eat as much butter at one sitting as you do those other products. (Unless you are like me, hehe.) And butter probably has much less lactose anyway. You might try something like Lactaid if you want to consume dairy. See if that helps.

(Clarified butter would not usually be a problem, even for most lactose intolerant folks.)

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