5

votes

Carrageenan, polysorbate in cream

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created February 17, 2010 at 3:44 PM

I probably rely on grocery store brand heavy whipping cream a bit too much for my fat needs. It comes with carrageenan and polysorbate 80 as thickeners/emulsifiers. I'm not willing to give up the cream on the "precautionary principle" alone, as it would be costly to find a source of higher quality cream. Is there any evidence that these would be doing significant harm in the amounts present in the cream? Does anyone know of an inexpensive alternative?

Update: I propose that we petition Organic Valley to start a line of heavy cream that does not contain carrageenan or any other additives. Given the quality of their pastured butter, I think they are enlightened enough to listen to demand for natural cream. Currently, their dairy products are sold throughout the US in Whole Foods, etc. Send them a short note if you want a healthier choice for your cream:

Their customer service form

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on January 12, 2011
at 07:14 PM

Natural by Nature and Trickling Springs Creamery are both just cream, and they're VAT pasteurized, which leaves much of the enzymes intact. As far as I know, they're only on the East coast, though.

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on January 12, 2011
at 07:01 PM

@Acton- The place where I'm buying my raw milk does sell raw cream- but a quart costs as much as a full gallon of milk, so cost wise, it's more or less the same if all you want is the fat. Skim milk was traditionally used to fatten pigs- and they do have pastured and milk fed pigs. So, I'd say that it depends on the farm. That said, where I used to buy my milk, they didn't sell the cream separate.

35a9207254408c6907f7082640c7bfaa

(822)

on August 03, 2010
at 08:49 AM

Frustrating. $6/qt and full of additives is all that's available locally.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on June 08, 2010
at 07:53 PM

http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/egov/Press_Releases/Press_Release.asp?PRnum=08-061 http://efoodalert.blogspot.com/2008/06/organic-pastures-happy-cows-e-coli.html http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/2007/09/articles/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/listeria-warning-for-raw-cream/

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on June 08, 2010
at 07:51 PM

Campylobacter http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/egov/Press_Releases/Press_Release.asp?PRnum=08-061 E. coli http://efoodalert.blogspot.com/2008/06/organic-pastures-happy-cows-e-coli.html Listeria http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/2007/09/articles/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/listeria-warning-for-raw-cream/

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on June 08, 2010
at 07:49 PM

Listeria http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/2007/09/articles/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/listeria-warning-for-raw-cream/ E. coli http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/egov/Press_Releases/Press_Release.asp?PRnum=08-061 Campylobacter http://efoodalert.blogspot.com/2008/06/organic-pastures-happy-cows-e-coli.html

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on June 08, 2010
at 07:08 PM

Why would you drink raw dairy products if you care about your health?

Be4b60059db3511771303de1613ecb67

(1137)

on March 03, 2010
at 08:59 PM

Organic Valley has two kinds of whipping cream. One is pasteurized and only contains cream, the other one is ultra-pasteurized and contains carrageenan. My Whole Foods has both, and the regular goes very fast.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on February 20, 2010
at 08:56 AM

How much do you consume per week?

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on February 20, 2010
at 08:56 AM

I buy mine from Organic Pastures through a local grocer (http://www.organicpastures.com/products_cream.html). They sell cream at $9.99 for 1 pint. They also sell skim milk. I have no idea who buys it but I'm grateful that they do! ;)

6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on February 20, 2010
at 08:21 AM

I appreciate the sentiment, but I could never afford it in the amounts I consume. I doubt any raw milk dairies even sell cream, because that would necessitate them also doing something with the skim. I don't think anyone informed enough to buy raw milk would touch skim milk.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 18, 2010
at 12:42 AM

Don't think the carageenen is as bad as the polysorbate. If I can hardly pronounce it I usually don't want to eat it. We used to have a milk cow and have all the cream we could eat- I made my own butter and cheese and ricotta. Those were the days! Now, in Mexico, I have difficulty finding PLAIN yogurt -almost all of it contains sugar.

693b4a92133c19c288277dae8b43ab69

(188)

on February 17, 2010
at 08:50 PM

I'm in Canada. I usually buy Harmony Organic whipping cream. Ingredients: cream. http://www.harmonyorganic.on.ca/store/prod/8

60b0d3e60670f645cca59f67710b4820

(399)

on February 17, 2010
at 06:42 PM

What brand of organic cream do you buy? Even Organic Valley adds carrageenan.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 17, 2010
at 04:54 PM

I'm appalled! In the UK you can get plain single/double cream in any supermarket, plus usually untainted sour cream/creme fraiche. It's cheap too, about $0.43 for 100ml/445 calories, about the same as the cheapest rice/bread per calorie.

  • 6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

    asked by

    (2041)
  • Views
    6.4K
  • Last Activity
    1522D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

5 Answers

6
E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 17, 2010
at 05:55 PM

Carrageenan looks to be pretty awful: inducing inflammation, messing with the immune system and possibly degrading into a substance that tears up the digestive tract. I've not looked into any further detail since just that seems enough to put me off!

Polysorbate 80 looks to be pretty ok, I didn't see anything on pubmed either, aside from the possibility of reactions if you're sensitive, but that's from external use anyway,

As to other sources. I think the main way to easily get lots of fat into your diet would be to use lots of butter (or whatever) whenever you cook; it's about as cheap as cream too. The SFA from cream/butter is so slowly digested/released that it's not really an instant energy source anyway, so it shouldn't matter too much when in the day you have it. Any coconut product would be fine. Where I am, dessicated coconut is cheaper than cream per calorie, and I used to use it as a staple; the creamed coconut/milk is more expensive, but more convenient. Being an MCT it's not a direct replacement for dairy fat though. I found macadamia nuts to be a convenient source of pure fat, but worried about the antinutrients. If you were ok with MFA, liberal use of olive oil thrown over any meat/veg would be cheap, (shame about the omega 6, but it's pretty passable).

0
C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on June 09, 2010
at 12:34 AM

Depending on your location, Whole Foods sells Garelick Farm "organic" heavy cream with no additives, and Sky Top Farm heavy cream which is "organic grass-fed unhomogenized" (scare quotes because after all it's marketing). The latter is $3/pint but it is absolutely delicious. I never knew cream could taste like something besides white oil. I am in northeast Massachusetts so your mileage may vary.

Unfortunately Whole Foods sells plenty of adulterated cream along with a great many other unhealthy products, but that's all I got here.

0
84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on June 08, 2010
at 02:52 PM

KGH's take on Carrageenan:

Carrageenan is a polysaccharide, not a protein. Despite in vitro experiments, it is hard to imagine a polymer of dextrose being near as immunogenic or otherwise dangerous as gliadin proteins

I can't answer either of those questions for certain but 30% protein is certainly not deficient.

0
693b4a92133c19c288277dae8b43ab69

on February 17, 2010
at 05:50 PM

I've read this question a couple of times and I'm not sure what you are asking!

Are you looking for fat alternatives? Surely you can't be looking for alternatives to carageenan...! Or are you looking for inexpensive non-grocery store whipping cream alternatives?

If it is the latter, you may want to investigate a milk or raw milk co-op in your area. But I'm with David Moss - on a calorie-specific basis, the organic cream I buy is not overly expensive.

60b0d3e60670f645cca59f67710b4820

(399)

on February 17, 2010
at 06:42 PM

What brand of organic cream do you buy? Even Organic Valley adds carrageenan.

693b4a92133c19c288277dae8b43ab69

(188)

on February 17, 2010
at 08:50 PM

I'm in Canada. I usually buy Harmony Organic whipping cream. Ingredients: cream. http://www.harmonyorganic.on.ca/store/prod/8

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 18, 2010
at 12:42 AM

Don't think the carageenen is as bad as the polysorbate. If I can hardly pronounce it I usually don't want to eat it. We used to have a milk cow and have all the cream we could eat- I made my own butter and cheese and ricotta. Those were the days! Now, in Mexico, I have difficulty finding PLAIN yogurt -almost all of it contains sugar.

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on January 12, 2011
at 07:14 PM

Natural by Nature and Trickling Springs Creamery are both just cream, and they're VAT pasteurized, which leaves much of the enzymes intact. As far as I know, they're only on the East coast, though.

-2
A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on February 20, 2010
at 08:11 AM

I suggest finding a local supplier of raw cream at realmilk.com.

From The Nourished Kitchen:

Fresh, raw cream is a living food. It contains beneficial bacteria and enzymes which are otherwise destroyed during pasteurization and it is precisely these components of living foods that make them so valuable to our overall health. These enzymes enable better digestion of macronutrients and better absorption of micronutrients while the beneficial bacteria promotes intenstinal health and a well-functioning immune system.

Raw cream is more expensive, but absolutely worth it if you're going to consume dairy!

6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on February 20, 2010
at 08:21 AM

I appreciate the sentiment, but I could never afford it in the amounts I consume. I doubt any raw milk dairies even sell cream, because that would necessitate them also doing something with the skim. I don't think anyone informed enough to buy raw milk would touch skim milk.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on February 20, 2010
at 08:56 AM

How much do you consume per week?

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on February 20, 2010
at 08:56 AM

I buy mine from Organic Pastures through a local grocer (http://www.organicpastures.com/products_cream.html). They sell cream at $9.99 for 1 pint. They also sell skim milk. I have no idea who buys it but I'm grateful that they do! ;)

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on June 08, 2010
at 07:49 PM

Listeria http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/2007/09/articles/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/listeria-warning-for-raw-cream/ E. coli http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/egov/Press_Releases/Press_Release.asp?PRnum=08-061 Campylobacter http://efoodalert.blogspot.com/2008/06/organic-pastures-happy-cows-e-coli.html

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on June 08, 2010
at 07:08 PM

Why would you drink raw dairy products if you care about your health?

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on June 08, 2010
at 07:51 PM

Campylobacter http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/egov/Press_Releases/Press_Release.asp?PRnum=08-061 E. coli http://efoodalert.blogspot.com/2008/06/organic-pastures-happy-cows-e-coli.html Listeria http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/2007/09/articles/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/listeria-warning-for-raw-cream/

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on June 08, 2010
at 07:53 PM

http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/egov/Press_Releases/Press_Release.asp?PRnum=08-061 http://efoodalert.blogspot.com/2008/06/organic-pastures-happy-cows-e-coli.html http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/2007/09/articles/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/listeria-warning-for-raw-cream/

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on January 12, 2011
at 07:01 PM

@Acton- The place where I'm buying my raw milk does sell raw cream- but a quart costs as much as a full gallon of milk, so cost wise, it's more or less the same if all you want is the fat. Skim milk was traditionally used to fatten pigs- and they do have pastured and milk fed pigs. So, I'd say that it depends on the farm. That said, where I used to buy my milk, they didn't sell the cream separate.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!