2

votes

Can I eat butter? or is ghee better?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 13, 2011 at 10:09 AM

Being strict paleo, I understand that I would have to eliminate butter...

but my question is, is there any reason to eliminate butter? I have heard anecdotal evidence that it might raise insulin levels, but I haven't been able to find any studies that prove it (with good variable isolation).

And before people ask me what my goals are, I'll just state that I am trying to understand as best as possible rather than achieve. I am already doing really well and would likely continue for some time...but I would like to understand what I'm doing and be able to explain it to people when they ask.

Thanks!

Also...is Ghee preferred to butter? If so, why?

3b3a449b6705e9ec8b141d0bd07c1a64

(1489)

on April 05, 2012
at 03:17 PM

god i love goats butter.....

9ac8a7b68cf079b22de42b703e466e64

(787)

on May 02, 2011
at 10:20 PM

i know this is a little late but here you go: http://www.kerrygold.com/usa/press/kerrygold_consumer_fact_sheet.pdf

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 21, 2011
at 01:07 AM

I spoke to a Kerrygold rep who assured me all of their products are 100% grass fed. Ireland has one of the longest grass growing seasons in the world and their farmers are catching on that "grass fed" sells. Additionally, treating cows with growth hormones is illegal in Ireland. (Also so are big box stores over the size of 6000 square meters, though they're allowed in Northern Ireland- gotta love the Irish)

Ce762ef3660ab44dbc72fdd7ff8fb168

(290)

on February 17, 2011
at 11:59 AM

Heavy cream yes, ghee no. That said, ghee is butters poor cousin IMHO.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 17, 2011
at 10:23 AM

Even heavy cream and gee ? I'm sorry for the butter and cheese. I understand the love, trust me :)

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on February 15, 2011
at 04:38 AM

I tried the goat butter yesterday. It's very sweet, almost like tapioca in flavor. It was so good that I actually licked it off my knife, which is something I would typically never do! Needless to say, I enjoyed it. :)

Ce762ef3660ab44dbc72fdd7ff8fb168

(290)

on February 14, 2011
at 09:51 PM

Yes. Dairy seems to equal at least an increased level of skin oiliness. Cheese is the worst for acne and milk is worst for nasal congestion. Its a real bugger because I really enjoy butter and cheese.

Eeefb4a4b2ac14b006f087cf77ba9f23

(106)

on February 14, 2011
at 05:37 PM

+1 for the nutrition vs historical reenactment argument

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 14, 2011
at 09:53 AM

You don't have to anything :D This is NOT a religion.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 14, 2011
at 09:53 AM

Interesting. Do you have this problem with other diary products too ?

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 14, 2011
at 09:52 AM

How does it taste ?

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 14, 2011
at 09:52 AM

Same thought as Naomi :D I don't think all Irish butter/cheese is grass-fed. Maybe Kerrygold's products.

F9a0b72f38860d7601afd5a45bb53394

(3618)

on February 14, 2011
at 01:40 AM

So make ghee out of it. That avoids the casein question entirely.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on February 14, 2011
at 12:29 AM

It is my understanding from the boards here, as well as Robb Wolf's podcast, that all Irish butter/cheese is grass-fed.

Bcc4479de4f16939076e0a00e2db1261

(94)

on February 13, 2011
at 11:09 PM

I was looking for grass fed butter at Trader Joes and I have bought Kerrygold before.....you're positive it's grass fed, because it doesn't say?

3f5bbb444498a24f1a9720d75fa7c903

(2369)

on February 13, 2011
at 09:13 PM

The St Helens brand has a more distinct butter flavor - very clean and a touch salty. I am old enough (52) to remember how butter used to taste in my childhood and that is what it tastes like. Not at all like the bland, greasy stuff in the stores today. I find Kerrygold a bit greasy in comparison and even that is miles above what you can usually find in the supermarket.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on February 13, 2011
at 08:42 PM

I was just directing away from most commercial US butter as something to look for. People obviously need to do the research themselves for anything they plan to buy. I know Kerrygold Irish butter is grass-fed. I didn't word my answer well enough, I didn't mean to imply that ALL European butter is grass-fed.

9ac8a7b68cf079b22de42b703e466e64

(787)

on February 13, 2011
at 08:37 PM

Yeah I do avoid grassfed butter (kerrygold) because it doesn't agree with me. I get some major stomach gurgling and unwanted farts (tmi, i know). It tastes amazing though.

Fa47fe5368e66325865f60a928609145

(961)

on February 13, 2011
at 08:09 PM

I can't imagine that all butter that came from europe is also grass-fed. Where'd you get that idea? Over here (in europe, holland) there's a lot of butter that definitely isn't from grass-only fed cows.

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on February 13, 2011
at 08:09 PM

I recently saw goat butter at my natural food store. Since tentatively dabbling in goat yoghurt (which I'm going to very cautiously call a success), I'm curious to try it. I may pick some up today. :)

0bcefaa82dc94f93ce705f86e235f335

(1591)

on February 13, 2011
at 07:59 PM

Hahaha, I feel the same way about butter. Cold dead hands indeed! :)

Ce762ef3660ab44dbc72fdd7ff8fb168

(290)

on February 13, 2011
at 07:08 PM

I have not been able to source any locally that is explicitly "grass fed". I eat butter infrequently enough that I tolerate a few back acne spots if I eat more than a few tablespoons of butter over a couple of days.

77f83ec328459dce702216709762e202

(571)

on February 13, 2011
at 07:03 PM

That sounds absolutely fantastic. I think I'm going to have to try that.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on February 13, 2011
at 06:51 PM

I've never seen goat butter before either. How does it compare in flavor?

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on February 13, 2011
at 06:50 PM

I'm not one to say that people aren't allergic to butter. I'm just happy I'm not one of them. :)

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on February 13, 2011
at 06:48 PM

Because they're allergic to the caseins in it? Or, in my case, I can't find any in the stores near me... :(

3f5bbb444498a24f1a9720d75fa7c903

(2369)

on February 13, 2011
at 06:48 PM

The brand I buy is St. Helens Farm Goat Butter. All goats' milk and does have some carotenes added for color. It is from York, UK. But I buy mine at Wegman's. Literally, this stuff is so good, you can eat it alone! There is also a source of goat butter in Lancaster, PA - pastureraised.net.

0bcefaa82dc94f93ce705f86e235f335

(1591)

on February 13, 2011
at 06:26 PM

Huh, their website says YDFM carries it, but I've never seen it there... looks like Whole Paycheck and Ingles as well.

0bcefaa82dc94f93ce705f86e235f335

(1591)

on February 13, 2011
at 06:24 PM

Looks like amazon carries this brand, which is grassfed: http://meyenberg.com/index.php?page=specialty-products-2 Local to Atlanta: still looking...

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on February 13, 2011
at 06:11 PM

i have to look for goat butter now...grassfed of course.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on February 13, 2011
at 06:11 PM

Perhaps a better question: Why would anyone avoid Grassfed Butter?

95eda9fa0cec952b482e869c34a566b6

on February 13, 2011
at 06:05 PM

I've had goat cheese, but never goat butter. I'll have to look for it.

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 13, 2011
at 04:46 PM

This is the first time I've heard anyone mention goat butter...where in the world do you get goat butter from (I know, I know...*from goats*, LOL) because I would love to try it.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on February 13, 2011
at 04:42 PM

Have you tried pastured butter? Grain fed gives me acne, but pastured is fine.

Ceda025d1f349bc43be115a5f9199fb1

(501)

on February 13, 2011
at 01:36 PM

Yeah, James has it. Butter has some of small amount milk proteins and sugars left in it. It has fat soluble nutrients as well, more so in pastured butter. Also, a lot of calories that can add up quick if you add it to everything. That can be good or bad depending on your needs. I use it with some restraint due to not needing so much extra food energy. I'm slightly skeptical of those who has isolated butter as an allergen. That would require enormous effort to rule out confounding variables.

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6 Answers

7
1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 13, 2011
at 04:49 PM

I love butter...to take it away from me, you'd have to pry it out of my cold, dead hands. One of my favorite lunches is a slab of cold rump roast with a thick layer of cold butter on it, with a little salt and pepper.

77f83ec328459dce702216709762e202

(571)

on February 13, 2011
at 07:03 PM

That sounds absolutely fantastic. I think I'm going to have to try that.

0bcefaa82dc94f93ce705f86e235f335

(1591)

on February 13, 2011
at 07:59 PM

Hahaha, I feel the same way about butter. Cold dead hands indeed! :)

7
7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

on February 13, 2011
at 01:25 PM

Yes, you can eat whatever you want. ;)

Seriously, though, if you want to eat butter try to find a European butter, like Kerrygold (they have it at Sam's Club/Costco/Trader Joes) because the cows are grass-fed which reduces harmful stuff in your delicious butter.

Truly strict Paleo doesn't not usually include dairy, that is because dairy can raise insulin levels. Many Paleo people continue to eat dairy and will call it "lacto-Paleo". Usually they stick to low casein type dairy like butter, heavy cream, hard cheeses and greek/goat yogurt, but some eat all dairy. Some people that consider themselves very strict Paleo eaters still eat butter and heavy cream because they have low amounts of casein and are yummy!

If you aren't sure if you react to dairy, you should eliminate it from your diet for 30 days, then add it back in and see if there are any reactions.

Fa47fe5368e66325865f60a928609145

(961)

on February 13, 2011
at 08:09 PM

I can't imagine that all butter that came from europe is also grass-fed. Where'd you get that idea? Over here (in europe, holland) there's a lot of butter that definitely isn't from grass-only fed cows.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on February 13, 2011
at 08:42 PM

I was just directing away from most commercial US butter as something to look for. People obviously need to do the research themselves for anything they plan to buy. I know Kerrygold Irish butter is grass-fed. I didn't word my answer well enough, I didn't mean to imply that ALL European butter is grass-fed.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on February 14, 2011
at 12:29 AM

It is my understanding from the boards here, as well as Robb Wolf's podcast, that all Irish butter/cheese is grass-fed.

Bcc4479de4f16939076e0a00e2db1261

(94)

on February 13, 2011
at 11:09 PM

I was looking for grass fed butter at Trader Joes and I have bought Kerrygold before.....you're positive it's grass fed, because it doesn't say?

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 14, 2011
at 09:52 AM

Same thought as Naomi :D I don't think all Irish butter/cheese is grass-fed. Maybe Kerrygold's products.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 21, 2011
at 01:07 AM

I spoke to a Kerrygold rep who assured me all of their products are 100% grass fed. Ireland has one of the longest grass growing seasons in the world and their farmers are catching on that "grass fed" sells. Additionally, treating cows with growth hormones is illegal in Ireland. (Also so are big box stores over the size of 6000 square meters, though they're allowed in Northern Ireland- gotta love the Irish)

9ac8a7b68cf079b22de42b703e466e64

(787)

on May 02, 2011
at 10:20 PM

i know this is a little late but here you go: http://www.kerrygold.com/usa/press/kerrygold_consumer_fact_sheet.pdf

5
3f5bbb444498a24f1a9720d75fa7c903

on February 13, 2011
at 03:32 PM

I have found the most delicious butter to be goat butter. It has less casein (protein in butter) and an amazing taste. But I am not "strict" paleo - I prefer not to be fundamentalist in anything and I love my butter!

95eda9fa0cec952b482e869c34a566b6

on February 13, 2011
at 06:05 PM

I've had goat cheese, but never goat butter. I'll have to look for it.

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 13, 2011
at 04:46 PM

This is the first time I've heard anyone mention goat butter...where in the world do you get goat butter from (I know, I know...*from goats*, LOL) because I would love to try it.

0bcefaa82dc94f93ce705f86e235f335

(1591)

on February 13, 2011
at 06:26 PM

Huh, their website says YDFM carries it, but I've never seen it there... looks like Whole Paycheck and Ingles as well.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on February 13, 2011
at 06:51 PM

I've never seen goat butter before either. How does it compare in flavor?

0bcefaa82dc94f93ce705f86e235f335

(1591)

on February 13, 2011
at 06:24 PM

Looks like amazon carries this brand, which is grassfed: http://meyenberg.com/index.php?page=specialty-products-2 Local to Atlanta: still looking...

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 14, 2011
at 09:52 AM

How does it taste ?

3f5bbb444498a24f1a9720d75fa7c903

(2369)

on February 13, 2011
at 09:13 PM

The St Helens brand has a more distinct butter flavor - very clean and a touch salty. I am old enough (52) to remember how butter used to taste in my childhood and that is what it tastes like. Not at all like the bland, greasy stuff in the stores today. I find Kerrygold a bit greasy in comparison and even that is miles above what you can usually find in the supermarket.

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on February 15, 2011
at 04:38 AM

I tried the goat butter yesterday. It's very sweet, almost like tapioca in flavor. It was so good that I actually licked it off my knife, which is something I would typically never do! Needless to say, I enjoyed it. :)

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on February 13, 2011
at 08:09 PM

I recently saw goat butter at my natural food store. Since tentatively dabbling in goat yoghurt (which I'm going to very cautiously call a success), I'm curious to try it. I may pick some up today. :)

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on February 13, 2011
at 06:11 PM

i have to look for goat butter now...grassfed of course.

3f5bbb444498a24f1a9720d75fa7c903

(2369)

on February 13, 2011
at 06:48 PM

The brand I buy is St. Helens Farm Goat Butter. All goats' milk and does have some carotenes added for color. It is from York, UK. But I buy mine at Wegman's. Literally, this stuff is so good, you can eat it alone! There is also a source of goat butter in Lancaster, PA - pastureraised.net.

3b3a449b6705e9ec8b141d0bd07c1a64

(1489)

on April 05, 2012
at 03:17 PM

god i love goats butter.....

4
Medium avatar

on February 13, 2011
at 08:12 PM

Depends if you're interested in nutrition or strict historical reenactment. I use massive amounts of clarified butter. Great stuff.

Eeefb4a4b2ac14b006f087cf77ba9f23

(106)

on February 14, 2011
at 05:37 PM

+1 for the nutrition vs historical reenactment argument

3
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on February 13, 2011
at 11:03 AM

I believe the reason they exclude it is because of the dairy (presumably paleo folks weren't going around milking wild cows back in the day).

In terms of butter, there's milk solids, casein and the like in it. Can cause immune problems for some people.

While I don't have those problems, I like Ghee because it works at a higher temperature without burning, so good for cooking my eggs in, is a good source of fats, and lasts a long time at room temperature.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on February 13, 2011
at 06:50 PM

I'm not one to say that people aren't allergic to butter. I'm just happy I'm not one of them. :)

Ceda025d1f349bc43be115a5f9199fb1

(501)

on February 13, 2011
at 01:36 PM

Yeah, James has it. Butter has some of small amount milk proteins and sugars left in it. It has fat soluble nutrients as well, more so in pastured butter. Also, a lot of calories that can add up quick if you add it to everything. That can be good or bad depending on your needs. I use it with some restraint due to not needing so much extra food energy. I'm slightly skeptical of those who has isolated butter as an allergen. That would require enormous effort to rule out confounding variables.

2
Ce762ef3660ab44dbc72fdd7ff8fb168

on February 13, 2011
at 10:30 AM

Butter gives me acne. Try eliminating it, then later reintroducing for yourself to see if it matters to you.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on February 13, 2011
at 04:42 PM

Have you tried pastured butter? Grain fed gives me acne, but pastured is fine.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 14, 2011
at 09:53 AM

Interesting. Do you have this problem with other diary products too ?

Ce762ef3660ab44dbc72fdd7ff8fb168

(290)

on February 13, 2011
at 07:08 PM

I have not been able to source any locally that is explicitly "grass fed". I eat butter infrequently enough that I tolerate a few back acne spots if I eat more than a few tablespoons of butter over a couple of days.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on February 17, 2011
at 10:23 AM

Even heavy cream and gee ? I'm sorry for the butter and cheese. I understand the love, trust me :)

Ce762ef3660ab44dbc72fdd7ff8fb168

(290)

on February 14, 2011
at 09:51 PM

Yes. Dairy seems to equal at least an increased level of skin oiliness. Cheese is the worst for acne and milk is worst for nasal congestion. Its a real bugger because I really enjoy butter and cheese.

Ce762ef3660ab44dbc72fdd7ff8fb168

(290)

on February 17, 2011
at 11:59 AM

Heavy cream yes, ghee no. That said, ghee is butters poor cousin IMHO.

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