5

votes

A2 or A1 beta casein; legitimate or marketing ploy?

Commented on November 21, 2014
Created December 17, 2011 at 2:12 PM

I quote;

There are two main forms of the important cow's milk protein beta-casein found in the cow's milk that you drink. These two forms are known as A1 and A2 beta-casein.

The A2 form of beta-casein has been identified by scientific research to be the original form of beta-casein that would have been produced by cows thousands of years ago.

At some point in history, owing to natural genetic mutation, the A1 form appeared in dairy cattle and was spread throughout dairy herds across Europe, becoming the common form of beta-casein in many breeds of cows.

Traditional cattle breeds such as the zebu, the native Asian cattle and closely related animals such as the water buffalo and yak all still only produce the A2 type of beta-casein.

Some dairy cows still only produce the A2 type of beta-casein and these can be identified and milked to produce a2 Milk???.

by Professor Keith Woodford. 2007. Craig Potton Publishing (Christchurch) "Devil in the Milk" http://www.a2milk.com.au/about-a2-milk.php

Is there a potential benefit in regards to the consumption of A2 beta casein as opposed to A1 or is this just a marketing campaign? Im looking to add no more than a 250ml serving purely post strength workout 2-3 times a week as a performance/recovery aid.

Thank

Cbad09eef2dc0bf4b5f174b8e0c99100

(0)

on March 22, 2014
at 06:45 PM

I think that the authors just took some research on casein sensitivity and tried make some money and started pushing different cattle breeds milk, maybe, I dont know . I think the research shows that most problematic is the alpha S1 casein, or maybe both with beta casein and I dont see how you can get that out of milk.

Its very similar to gluten, both are very stretchy and gluey and hard to digest. You cant make cheese without it.

Cbad09eef2dc0bf4b5f174b8e0c99100

(0)

on March 22, 2014
at 06:29 PM

AlphaS1 casein seems to be the one casein that is responsible for the autoimmune response in some people, like gliadin. Maybe the fact that it has some very strong bond between aminos, which makes it perfect for things like glues and stretchy foods, but also very hard to digest.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on March 22, 2014
at 05:07 PM

True, but it's not strong in Holsteins and since all the cow milk is mixed from the whole herd, you will get mostly A1 if drinking their milk. Theoretically, you could over a long time develop a breeding program to develop A2 Holsteins but it would take time and money.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on March 22, 2014
at 04:58 PM

There hasn't been much study but BCM7 is found in baby's blood and bovine BCM7 has also been found in baby's blood, so it does get in. ( http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19576256 ) Some things are allowed past the gut border via natural transport mechanisms. Bovine BCM7 resembles human BCM7 so may pass via natural mechanisms already in place. Human milk BCM7 is believed to be beneficial to babies but bovine BCM7 is believed to be detrimental (see that first study I linked) It also does cross the blood brain border: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6619862

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on March 22, 2014
at 04:57 PM

I've not stated any ratios are A1:A2 in breeds of cattle.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on March 22, 2014
at 04:56 PM

Also, we goat breeders are actively breeding for alphaS1 casein. :) It improves cheese yield.

47cbd166d262925037bc6f9a9265eb20

(55)

on March 22, 2014
at 03:16 PM

@matt-11 we won't get along very good this way. Just for you to know, your ratios of A1-A2 milks of the breeds are wrong, to start with.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on March 22, 2014
at 03:05 PM

"Most similar to gliadin"? Please.

47cbd166d262925037bc6f9a9265eb20

(55)

on March 22, 2014
at 02:26 PM

@matt-1 your A1-A2 ratios aren't true, where did you get them ?

4fe1b3748b81433a8991ea169ad3e4c7

(10)

on February 23, 2014
at 05:56 AM

You need to do more homework. Prof Boyd Swinburn conducted the review you mentioned and he was scathing of the way the NZFSA interpreted his findings. "The research that's there at the moment is very suggestive, but it's certainly not conclusive..... There's good rationale for dairy farmers to consider changing their herds, but there's not empirical evidence that's strong enough for government warnings." Swinburn went on to warn people with a family history of type 1 diabetes; or who are at high risk of heart disease; or who have an autistic child to consider switching to A2 milk.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on December 24, 2011
at 02:35 AM

Ed, Jersey milk protein is roughly about 40% A2 so it is not really much different than regular milk.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on December 24, 2011
at 02:28 AM

Jersey milk is on average about 40% A1 and 60% A2.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on December 24, 2011
at 02:27 AM

If you start believing things just because they are written down in a book you can get into all kinds of trouble.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on December 24, 2011
at 02:22 AM

If you got your milk from a single Holstein cow it would either be 100% A2 or 100% A1.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on December 24, 2011
at 02:20 AM

Holsteins also produce A2 milk or about 50% of Holstein cows do anyway. It is just a case of selecting your herd of dairy cows based on genetic testing for individuals with the gene variant you want. "Big Milk" production is not affected much.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 12:44 AM

"no marketing advantage to A2 production": except for the royalties paid for labeling milk as A2, and the ability to sell A2 at a premium price for the possible associated benefits. Also, I had a few Holstiens when I was younger, on my grandparents farm. I considered them "real cute and friendly and smart"- cows are similar to other animals in that respect, some are bright and some are dumb. Ours were real sweethearts. It's kind of bull (pun intended!) to say that they are all dumb.

9bd33dab06ad6696b1b6a06aed818f05

(659)

on December 18, 2011
at 12:16 AM

that add's up, it is a more expensive milk here in aus. But quality over quantity right :)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 17, 2011
at 10:38 PM

Tom Cowan's web site is excellent. His Q&A is about as good anything Harris has written. There's just not enough of it. Another 80-100 hrs worth of reading would have been sooo. much better.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on December 17, 2011
at 09:35 PM

I am pretty down on dairy anyway because casein protein is the dairy counterpart of gluten in grains.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on December 17, 2011
at 09:29 PM

Dude I am used to down votes......it does not faze me. It lights my way.

36ba71ea8bc4f736f4113433fde572bd

(347)

on December 17, 2011
at 07:08 PM

I'd like to know the answer, too. _Devil in the Milk_ doesn't strike me as super credible, and I don't know if I have the chops to read the Nature paper super critically. Tossed-off answers like the one from The Quilt don't help, unfortunately. Shrug. Anyway, it just so happens that we get raw milk from Jersey cows most of the time, so I guess we are sitting pretty.. Who knows!

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 17, 2011
at 07:08 PM

Wait, they studied it and found evidence one way or another and yet, they chose to not publish it? Why not?

Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

(1453)

on December 17, 2011
at 03:42 PM

lol. nice theory

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 17, 2011
at 03:22 PM

good explaination for the downvote. @ Quilt, lazy, lazy answer! but why was my answer downvoted?Because I find brown cows cute?

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on December 17, 2011
at 03:16 PM

Good find !

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on December 17, 2011
at 03:15 PM

It wasn't me this time. However, considering this answer simply repeats something already in the question, it's not that surprising to me, given that a downvote is supposed to indicate "not helpful".

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 17, 2011
at 03:00 PM

"Huge adjustments in world dairy production" HMMMMMMMM!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 17, 2011
at 02:53 PM

Identify yourself, coward!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 17, 2011
at 02:53 PM

I got one(-1) too. Tell me it isn't so! Are we being spied on by BIG DAIRY?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 17, 2011
at 02:52 PM

a down vote ? For brown cows, or for Dr. Quilt? Either way , this must be a bad joke?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on December 17, 2011
at 02:44 PM

nope I rise to see the sunrise every morning I am breathing.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 17, 2011
at 02:29 PM

Good morning Jack! Don't you ever sleep in?

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16 Answers

best answer

8
E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on December 17, 2011
at 02:40 PM

http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v59/n5/abs/1602104a.html

"The A1/A2 milk hypothesis was ingenious. If the scientific evidence had worked out it would have required huge adjustments in the world's dairy industries. This review concludes, however, that there is no convincing or even probable evidence that the A1 beta-casein of cow milk has any adverse effect in humans.

This review has been independent of examination of evidence related to A1 and A2 milk by the Australian and New Zealand food standard and food safety authorities, which have not published the evidence they have examined and the analysis of it. They stated in 2003 that no relationship has been established between A1 or A2 milk and diabetes, CHD or other diseases."

Its BS imo

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 17, 2011
at 03:00 PM

"Huge adjustments in world dairy production" HMMMMMMMM!

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 17, 2011
at 07:08 PM

Wait, they studied it and found evidence one way or another and yet, they chose to not publish it? Why not?

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on December 17, 2011
at 03:16 PM

Good find !

4fe1b3748b81433a8991ea169ad3e4c7

(10)

on February 23, 2014
at 05:56 AM

You need to do more homework. Prof Boyd Swinburn conducted the review you mentioned and he was scathing of the way the NZFSA interpreted his findings. "The research that's there at the moment is very suggestive, but it's certainly not conclusive..... There's good rationale for dairy farmers to consider changing their herds, but there's not empirical evidence that's strong enough for government warnings." Swinburn went on to warn people with a family history of type 1 diabetes; or who are at high risk of heart disease; or who have an autistic child to consider switching to A2 milk.

5
0faecc3397025eab246241f4dcd81f5e

(2361)

on December 17, 2011
at 09:46 PM

Anecdotal I know - but my father gets a lot of mucous production with milk. When he switched to A2 milk it went completely.

This article explains it http://thebovine.wordpress.com/2009/03/20/the-devil-in-the-milk-dr-thomas-cowan-on-how-a2-milk-is-the-answer-to-the-mystery-of-why-even-raw-milk-sometimes-does-not-seem-to-be-enough-of-an-improvement-over-store-bought/

"As you may or may not know, all proteins are long chains of amino acids that have many ???branches??? coming off different parts of the main chain. Beta casein is a 229 chain of amino acids with a proline at number 67 ??? at least the proline is there in ???old- fashioned??? cows. These cows with proline at number 67 are called A2 cows and are the older breeds of cows (e.g. Jerseys, Asian and African cows). Some five thousand years ago, a mutation occurred in this proline amino acid, converting it to histidine. Cows that have this mutated beta casein are called A1 cows, and include breeds like Holstein.

The side chain that comes off this amino acid is called BCM 7. BCM 7 is a small protein (called a peptide) that is a very powerful opiate and has some undesirable effects on animals and humans. What???s important here is that proline has a strong bond to BCM 7 which helps keep it from getting into the milk, so that essentially no BCM 7 is found in the urine, blood or GI tract of old-fashioned A2 cows. On the other hand, histidine, the mutated protein, only weakly holds on to BCM 7, so it is liberated in the GI tract of animals and humans who drink A1 cow milk, and it is found in significant quantity in the blood and urine of these animals.

This opiate BCM 7 has been shown in the research outlined in the book to cause neurological impairment in animals and people exposed to it, especially autistic and schizophrenic changes. BCM 7 interferes with the immune response, and injecting BCM 7 in animal models has been shown to provoke Type 1 diabetes. Dr. Woodford presents research showing a direct correlation between a population???s exposure to A1 cow???s milk and incidence of auto-immune disease, heart disease (BCM 7 has a pro-inflammatory effect on the blood vessels), type 1 diabetes, autism, and schizophrenia. What really caught my eye is that BCM 7 selectively binds to the epithelial cells in the mucus membranes (i.e. the nose) and stimulates mucus secretion."

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 17, 2011
at 10:38 PM

Tom Cowan's web site is excellent. His Q&A is about as good anything Harris has written. There's just not enough of it. Another 80-100 hrs worth of reading would have been sooo. much better.

4
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on December 17, 2011
at 02:25 PM

it's legit. Read the Devil in Milk.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 17, 2011
at 02:52 PM

a down vote ? For brown cows, or for Dr. Quilt? Either way , this must be a bad joke?

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on December 17, 2011
at 03:15 PM

It wasn't me this time. However, considering this answer simply repeats something already in the question, it's not that surprising to me, given that a downvote is supposed to indicate "not helpful".

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on December 17, 2011
at 09:29 PM

Dude I am used to down votes......it does not faze me. It lights my way.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 17, 2011
at 03:22 PM

good explaination for the downvote. @ Quilt, lazy, lazy answer! but why was my answer downvoted?Because I find brown cows cute?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on December 17, 2011
at 02:44 PM

nope I rise to see the sunrise every morning I am breathing.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 17, 2011
at 02:29 PM

Good morning Jack! Don't you ever sleep in?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on December 17, 2011
at 09:35 PM

I am pretty down on dairy anyway because casein protein is the dairy counterpart of gluten in grains.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on December 24, 2011
at 02:27 AM

If you start believing things just because they are written down in a book you can get into all kinds of trouble.

3
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 17, 2011
at 02:27 PM

There is no marketing advantage to a2 production as far a I can tell. Aren't a2 cows generally smaller and/or less "CASH COWS" in a sense of smaller producers? That's why Holstiens are the cow of choice in Big Milk production.... Side note, those little brown cows are real cute and friendly and smart. The reason given is that they drink a2 milk as calves! Holstiens obvouly drink a1 milk and suffer the same fate as humans drinking a1 milk. A dumbing down due to opiate receptor stimulation in the brain.ie Holstiens spend there formative years, stoned out of there minds! Fun theory, of course it could be all bullshit. So the answer to your question is. Producers of a2 milk are producing quality at the expense of quantity. There are different size brown cows, but they are dwarfed by the big black ones.

4a8b55b3f846504f945dd39c608695f9

(0)

on November 21, 2014
at 05:33 PM

Some facts you may find interesting:

- The "little cows" you mention produce milk with significantly higher protein and butter fat content (higher quality)

- They do far less damage to pastureland in wet weather than the big guys.

- Many believe their meat is superior.

- The cost of conversion to a A1 heard is very small if you have patience. The key is to use only A2 bulls for breeding. After a few breeding cycles the percentage of animals with predominantly A2 genetics will increase dramatically.

- A2 testing was very expensive, but the cost has dropped dramatically. Testing the most prolific cows for A2 and breeding them with A2 bulls will have very radid results.

- For the most part A2 was identified and researched in New Zealand.

- The anti A2 charge has been led by Forterra, the New Zealand dairy giant and "scientists" they have hire. 

- Fonterra agressively used their marketing power to squash A2

- Fonterra also financed legal actions to squash publish A2 research data.

- Generally speaking the huge corporates have never been acused of putting their customers health and welfare ahead of short term profits.

- Ironically, conversion to A2 is a very low cost way to gain a marketing advantage, which would greatly aid the dary farmer owners of the Fonterra Co-op

- Think about it and do some reading.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 17, 2011
at 02:53 PM

I got one(-1) too. Tell me it isn't so! Are we being spied on by BIG DAIRY?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 17, 2011
at 02:53 PM

Identify yourself, coward!

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on December 18, 2011
at 12:44 AM

"no marketing advantage to A2 production": except for the royalties paid for labeling milk as A2, and the ability to sell A2 at a premium price for the possible associated benefits. Also, I had a few Holstiens when I was younger, on my grandparents farm. I considered them "real cute and friendly and smart"- cows are similar to other animals in that respect, some are bright and some are dumb. Ours were real sweethearts. It's kind of bull (pun intended!) to say that they are all dumb.

Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

(1453)

on December 17, 2011
at 03:42 PM

lol. nice theory

9bd33dab06ad6696b1b6a06aed818f05

(659)

on December 18, 2011
at 12:16 AM

that add's up, it is a more expensive milk here in aus. But quality over quantity right :)

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on December 24, 2011
at 02:22 AM

If you got your milk from a single Holstein cow it would either be 100% A2 or 100% A1.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on December 24, 2011
at 02:20 AM

Holsteins also produce A2 milk or about 50% of Holstein cows do anyway. It is just a case of selecting your herd of dairy cows based on genetic testing for individuals with the gene variant you want. "Big Milk" production is not affected much.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on December 24, 2011
at 02:28 AM

Jersey milk is on average about 40% A1 and 60% A2.

47cbd166d262925037bc6f9a9265eb20

(55)

on March 22, 2014
at 02:26 PM

@matt-1 your A1-A2 ratios aren't true, where did you get them ?

1
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on March 22, 2014
at 03:24 PM

There's interesting evidence for it. Research shows some babies and humans genetically retain betacasomorphin in their blood for much longer periods of time than others. The Russians have done some research correlating that tendency with health issued in babies that drink regular milk. Betacasomorphin also exists in human mother's milk but in a slightly different form and large amounts are only produced at the very beginning of lactation. Since betacasomorphin triggers morphine receptors, the purpose of this in human mother's milk may be to get the baby quickly hooked on wanting to nurse but since the amounts then greatly lesson, it is not something nature has found to be beneficial for short term initial but not long term administration. Babies that do NOT drink cow milk but are nursed by their mother and also have the tendency to conserve betacasomorphin in their blood are correlated with better health and strength as babies. So here you can see a genetic trait that seems to be advantageous in a natural environment but disadvantageous in an unnatural environment.

Because of the way A1 milk protein is constructed, it tends to be cleaved by stomach acids into smaller peptides leaving a lot of betacasomorphin. Betacasomorphin is a proven bioactive peptide. Whereas A2 milk, which is the type of milk that used to be more common in native tribe animals, tends to cleave so that it yields very little betacasomorphin peptides. But large industries prefer Holstein cows because they yield more milk and Holsteins are mostly A1 milk producers. Holsteins are also the least healthy cow but now with all the antibiotics and stuff, that is less of an issue for them.

IMO, the evidence for A2 vs A1 is good so far, but of course more research is needed.

(An interesting aside, betacasomorphin has a very similar structure to gliadorphin which is another bioactive peptide that comes from digestion of wheat and also seems to trigger morphin receptors. A1 milk and wheat are the two foods well known to trigger morphin receptor response in human cells, they are both addictive and both have been shown to interfere with proper digestive function in the gut)

1
47cbd166d262925037bc6f9a9265eb20

(55)

on March 22, 2014
at 02:51 PM

My experience tells me it is underresearched and A2's benefits over A1 is generally understated. I've read the book, the researches, and experienced with every possible option. Different breeds of cows have different A1 and A2 ratios and even a significant difference between that ratio makes a difference, but none of the breeds of the developed/western countries have fully A2 breeds, not even Jersey and Guernsey are; but any breed can be selected for a few generations to produce only A2 milk and there are some companies doing that. Goat and sheep milk is totally A2. Heat treatment releases the BCM-7 and therefore the extent of heat treatment also matters, making raw the best in this regard, but not even near making A1 as good as A2.

It is such a powerful opiate that it may be hard to decrease the consumption of, and actually I think even the people here opposing the idea of A1 being bad may be due to this opiate effect.

47cbd166d262925037bc6f9a9265eb20

(55)

on March 22, 2014
at 03:16 PM

@matt-11 we won't get along very good this way. Just for you to know, your ratios of A1-A2 milks of the breeds are wrong, to start with.

1
4fe1b3748b81433a8991ea169ad3e4c7

on February 23, 2014
at 05:44 AM

It is completely legitimate. For nearly 50 years I did not consume any dairy products whatsoever, due to discovering that it triggered in me asthma, sinus, ADHD and depression. I first heard about A2 milk on a visit to New Zealand 10 years ago but only gave it a try about 5 years later. Although I rarely consume milk itself (depletes calcium from the body), I daily consume yoghurt made from an A2 milk source (preferably raw) which has been allowed to ferment for 24 to 30 hours. Since doing so, I have taken my health to a whole new level. By the way, I have personally met with Prof Keith Woodford and am a great admirer of his work.

1
C628c72ed039aea093bba2be6b3563b7

on February 01, 2014
at 01:30 AM

I had a problem with stomach pain, gas, constipation and bloating from grocery store milk and milk products and also with A1 raw milk. After going gluten free,I was a little better but still had problems with yogurt. After a paleo diet and more healing I now live on A-2 raw milk and yogurt and cheese almost daily without any digestive issues. Praise God for the amish preserving the Jersey A-2 cows.

1
341ac977c75d87639e39db3fb06b616f

on February 27, 2013
at 11:44 AM

Some Holstiens are A2. Quite a few of them, in fact. I do have a friend who is "allergic to milk", but can drink A2 just fine.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on March 22, 2014
at 05:07 PM

True, but it's not strong in Holsteins and since all the cow milk is mixed from the whole herd, you will get mostly A1 if drinking their milk. Theoretically, you could over a long time develop a breeding program to develop A2 Holsteins but it would take time and money.

0
Cbad09eef2dc0bf4b5f174b8e0c99100

on March 22, 2014
at 04:02 PM

This theory of A1/A2 is weird, I dont think the body allows whole peptides to cross the intestines to the blood, they are too big, only aminos. Unless there is a leaky gut or an inflamed intestines. BM7 is a peptide chain.

I think there is also a peptide morphine like combination hiding in the alpha S1 casein, casomorphin. But it has to cross the intestinal barrier to do damage.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on March 22, 2014
at 04:58 PM

There hasn't been much study but BCM7 is found in baby's blood and bovine BCM7 has also been found in baby's blood, so it does get in. ( http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19576256 ) Some things are allowed past the gut border via natural transport mechanisms. Bovine BCM7 resembles human BCM7 so may pass via natural mechanisms already in place. Human milk BCM7 is believed to be beneficial to babies but bovine BCM7 is believed to be detrimental (see that first study I linked) It also does cross the blood brain border: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6619862

0
Cbad09eef2dc0bf4b5f174b8e0c99100

on March 22, 2014
at 01:02 PM

I dont think that the problematic part is the beta casein, but the alpha S1 casein, which is the one that is the most similar to gliadin (gluten). Most cows produce milk that has around 30% of alpha S1 casein, but goats and sheep produce milk with 10% of it, while human breast milk has 0%.Goat milk alpha S1 casein realy varies by specy, some have even lower in some have even 30%.

http://www.kozikase.cz/images/galleries/graf_kasein2.jpg

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on March 22, 2014
at 03:05 PM

"Most similar to gliadin"? Please.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on March 22, 2014
at 04:56 PM

Also, we goat breeders are actively breeding for alphaS1 casein. :) It improves cheese yield.

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on August 30, 2013
at 12:00 PM

It's legit. I have an allergy to cow's milk that causes acid reflux. Almost any fermented cow product such as yogurt, cheese, kefir, will trigger it. Fermented dairy from sheep, goats, buffalo will not.

However, I don't have issues with all of them, sometimes I can get away with a Haagen Dasz ice cream, or Kerry Gold cheese, so there are differences even in cows' milk products.

Since these things are fermented, it's not the lactose, but the protein.

I never have issues with whey protein powder (from which the casein was removed).

n=1, I know, but there's a difference there in my experience.

0
C9391df3ee50112b820eb0868b05c8fa

on August 30, 2013
at 02:34 AM

For me, two different types of casein does explain why cows' milk and its derivatives cause me to suffer ADHD, but the milk of other animals doesn't. For most people, however, I feel that the casein thing is a marketing ploy. After all, why fix what clearly isn't broken? And nor do I recommend raw milk since the slight chance of not having minor health issues isn't worth the huge risk of catching an enteric disease.

0
Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on December 17, 2011
at 06:25 PM

If it helps I'm pretty sure there's a quite a few things which are affecting your performance/recovery more than the difference between A2 and A1 milk would. I don't really know why you'd want to consume casein specifically post workout anyway.

0
Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

on December 17, 2011
at 03:28 PM

Dunno if the following is true, but this is at least the theory why A1 milk is inferior:

As you may or may not know, all proteins are long chains of amino acids that have many “branches” coming off different parts of the main chain. Beta casein is a 229 chain of amino acids with a proline at number 67 – at least the proline is there in “old- fashioned” cows. These cows with proline at number 67 are called A2 cows and are the older breeds of cows (e.g. Jerseys, Asian and African cows). Some five thousand years ago, a mutation occurred in this proline amino acid, converting it to histidine. Cows that have this mutated beta casein are called A1 cows, and include breeds like Holstein.

The side chain that comes off this amino acid is called BCM 7. BCM 7 is a small protein (called a peptide) that is a very powerful opiate and has some undesirable effects on animals and humans. What’s important here is that proline has a strong bond to BCM 7 which helps keep it from getting into the milk, so that essentially no BCM 7 is found in the urine, blood or GI tract of old-fashioned A2 cows. On the other hand, histidine, the mutated protein, only weakly holds on to BCM 7, so it is liberated in the GI tract of animals and humans who drink A1 cow milk, and it is found in significant quantity in the blood and urine of these animals.

This opiate BCM 7 has been shown in the research outlined in the book to cause neurological impairment in animals and people exposed to it, especially autistic and schizophrenic changes. BCM 7 interferes with the immune response, and injecting BCM 7 in animal models has been shown to provoke Type 1 diabetes. Dr. Woodford presents research showing a direct correlation between a population’s exposure to A1 cow’s milk and incidence of auto-immune disease, heart disease (BCM 7 has a pro-inflammatory effect on the blood vessels), type 1 diabetes, autism, and schizophrenia. What really caught my eye is that BCM 7 selectively binds to the epithelial cells in the mucus membranes (i.e. the nose) and stimulates mucus secretion.

source

However, isn't it difficult to analyse the health effects of a2 and a1 milk if all the other aspects of quality aren't looked into?

-1
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 22, 2014
at 01:51 PM

The A2 / A1 beta casein controversy is a legitimate marketing ploy!

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