1

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A few elimination questions

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created January 18, 2011 at 1:59 PM

Currently I try to eliminate some foods, mainly as n=1 experiment for my minor psoriasis (sort of an autoimmune/autoiflammatory condition), but maybe also for some other minor things I have noticed. Naturally I'm not at all obsessive about food, but just easy going. The only things I avoid like the plague are grains, because they cause immediate discomfort. Know your poisons...

Now I'm eliminating eggs, nightshades, nuts and dairy. (of course the rest is a paleo-diet)

My questions:

Do I have to leave out coconut too? And coconut oil?

What about my beloved grass fed butter?

Is it really important to be very strict?

Are nightshade spices something to avoid?

Is there some kind of continuum in these food groups? E.g. are some nightshades worse than others? Are some nuts less likely to have an impact?

So, again, I don't want to be obsessive, but I thought it was worth the experiment. Thanks for your suggestions!

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on January 19, 2011
at 01:53 AM

You've eliminated all the other legumes. Also it is hard to get gluten and dairy free chocolate

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on January 18, 2011
at 05:45 PM

Eva, thanks, I also wondered about the possibility of eliminating one at a time. But I'm not that patient. Better to quit all, and then reintroducen one by one. At least, better for somebody with my personality.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on January 18, 2011
at 05:44 PM

I eat chocolate, very black, but not that much. Why???????

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on January 18, 2011
at 04:53 PM

Butter has casein, ghee does not. I would go with ghee. If you're putting in the effort, might as well get it right. So be strict.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 18, 2011
at 04:39 PM

Oh, good to know PG! I had never heard anything bad about it.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 18, 2011
at 04:28 PM

Coconut oil is very high in salicylates, to which some people are extremely sensitive.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on January 18, 2011
at 03:20 PM

Phoenix, I always loved the saying. Luckily I don't live in Africa! Thanks

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on January 18, 2011
at 02:49 PM

Strict is the most important part by far, or you end up with flawed testing and long term misunderstanding

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8 Answers

3
7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

on January 18, 2011
at 02:36 PM

Well, an elimination diet can be anything you want it to be, it's just if you don't find the culprit the first time you may need to do it all over again.

Once you decide what you are eliminating is is VERY important to be strict.

I would say you can keep the coconut oil. I don't know of any reasons why not. I would also keep the butter, most people react to the caseins in dairy which butter does not have. It's up to you on the nightshade spices.

Different people react to different nightshades, your best bet is to eliminate them all to start with and same with the nuts.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on January 18, 2011
at 02:49 PM

Strict is the most important part by far, or you end up with flawed testing and long term misunderstanding

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 18, 2011
at 04:39 PM

Oh, good to know PG! I had never heard anything bad about it.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 18, 2011
at 04:28 PM

Coconut oil is very high in salicylates, to which some people are extremely sensitive.

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on January 18, 2011
at 04:53 PM

Butter has casein, ghee does not. I would go with ghee. If you're putting in the effort, might as well get it right. So be strict.

2
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on January 18, 2011
at 04:19 PM

The one thing you could could consider is eliminating one category at a time, like only do diary or only do nightshades. That way, if gain improvement, you will have a better idea what did it. Of course, that doesn't preclude that you will be better without all of them, but it may be only one category that is the problem and it will be easier and also more knowledge producing if you only do one at a time. But when you do that one, go whole hog and eliminate everything in that category religiously, at least at first. You need to find out decisively if there is a problem or not. Later, you can always experiment if there are some things that are worse offenders than others, but at first you need to find out for sure if there is a problem or not for that category of food.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on January 18, 2011
at 05:45 PM

Eva, thanks, I also wondered about the possibility of eliminating one at a time. But I'm not that patient. Better to quit all, and then reintroducen one by one. At least, better for somebody with my personality.

1
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

If you are testing tree nuts, coconut has to go.

Avoid the nightshade spices and challenge them separately.

Are you eating any chocolate?

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on January 18, 2011
at 05:44 PM

I eat chocolate, very black, but not that much. Why???????

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on January 19, 2011
at 01:53 AM

You've eliminated all the other legumes. Also it is hard to get gluten and dairy free chocolate

1
Medium avatar

on January 18, 2011
at 06:25 PM

I have a slight allergy to coconut and a pretty annoying nightshade allergy that causes me to itch all over a few hours after consumption. I'd be surprised if pasture butter could be a cause. If it were for me, I'd still eat it.

1
76f3ead3aa977d876bcf3331d35a36e9

(4620)

on January 18, 2011
at 02:56 PM

There's a saying that goes something like "When you hear hoofbeats, don't expect zebras." (I may have butchered that quote).

Basically, eliminating the most common culprits (nightshades, dairy, eggs, nuts) is the best way to go; from what I know, coconut is not a common culprit in autoimmune/autoiflammatory conditions. Then, if you see no results, try eliminating a variety of other foods, like coconut products.

And if you want to be the most effective, I'd say be as strict as possible. Try to avoid nightshade spices (I have heard of a couple people reacting to even those), and I would switch over to ghee if possible (pure fat; normal butter still has some traces of casein and lactose).

Good luck!

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on January 18, 2011
at 03:20 PM

Phoenix, I always loved the saying. Luckily I don't live in Africa! Thanks

1
D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

on January 18, 2011
at 02:38 PM

Some find that increasing the intake of saturated fats helps.

If the trouble is a reaction to something in a particular food, or the FailSafe diet information might be of some use:

http://failsafediet.wordpress.com/

The FAILSAFE diet is a diet designed to be free of additives, low in salicylates, amines and flavour enhancers. It is Sue Dengate???s term for the low-chemical exclusion diet formulated by allergists at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Australia. It is designed to treat sensitivities to specific natural and man-made flavouring, colouring and preservative chemicals found in foods.

Sensitivities to food chemicals are pharmacological and dose-related (like the side effects of drugs), rather than immune-mediated like allergies. Different people have dramatically different tolerance levels to salicylates, amines, glutamates, sulphites, food colourings and other additives, and sensitivity symptoms (intolerances), occur when a person???s tolerance levels are exceeded.

1
4e40d2b9e1a762949a25b958762aa10d

(762)

on January 18, 2011
at 02:33 PM

Hi Pieter,

IMO these are empirical questions that you should test for yourself. While no one can spend his life experimenting with every aspect of that life, I think you've hit on the important one- eliminating a dense source of carbs and processed vegetable oils.

Regarding nightshades (e.g. tomatoes, eggplants), try leaving them out for a month while recording some objective indicator of psoriasis severity like itchiness (if you have that) on a scale of 1 to 10, or the size or numbers of plaques. Once the 'test' period is over, see if there was a difference.

Why do you think that you should leave out coconut products and oils?

As for being on a continuum, I suspect my advice would be so generally as to be vacuous and perhaps accidentally true. As I advocated in the 1st paragraph, try for yourself because for you, it's important to know how your body reacts to these things. I think the method I mentioned in the second paragraph of recording some variable for a reasonable period of time is a good step away from anecdotal to a more rigorous approach. Of course N=1 experiments don't allow for controls nor do I assume you have ready access to labs to run your bloodwork.

Hope this helps, Mike

0
303da756656a877256622dd5dcf0a02e

(157)

on November 10, 2013
at 02:56 AM

Why don't you trying taking some omega 3 or using your intake of fish? I found this resolved my psoriasis issues right away. I think that people get a bit carried away with elimination diets. The main focus should be improving your digestion so that you can properly tolerate the foods your consuming. That said I think most ppl should be avoiding gluten and take a very hard look at their reaction to dairy products. I'm not a big fan of the failsafe diet. People just end up limiting themselves far too much!

,

Why don't you just start taking some omega 3 or eating more fish? That cured my psoriasis issues right away? People go a bit nuts on elimination diets in general. It's better to work on improving your digestion than continually limiting foods.

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