4

votes

What do folks think about this article on Vitamin D in the NY Times?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 13, 2012 at 8:50 PM

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/17/health/research/risks-when-too-much-vitamin-d-is-too-much.html

I've been doing 5000-10.000 iu for about a year now. No testing done, but I don't get sick at all...

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on January 14, 2012
at 09:27 PM

Thanks. My first downvote :)

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on January 14, 2012
at 04:08 PM

This article may be helpful:http://www.marksdailyapple.com/vitamin-d-sun-exposure-supplementation-and-doses/#axzz1jONubsVZ

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on January 14, 2012
at 02:24 PM

cytokine arrays are the next step after HS CRP's If patients can afford them they are best. Right now HS cRP's can be done when the provider/patient understand what the test can do and cant do to get you to optimal and minimize risk. Plus one.

25b139cc1954456d9ea469e40f984cd3

on January 14, 2012
at 06:39 AM

You need to get a blood test or three...response to D3 supplementation varies widely. I don't get about 40 unless I go above 10,000IU, for example. For many others, my dosage would be far too high.

0faecc3397025eab246241f4dcd81f5e

(2361)

on January 14, 2012
at 01:00 AM

Excess vit D does not end up in the toilet, it ends up being stored, and then you absorb a ton of calcium which ends up in your blood vessels and muscle tissue, or maybe you pee out the calcium and get painful kidney stones.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on January 13, 2012
at 10:53 PM

Also see: http://paleohacks.com/questions/88772/for-those-with-high-vitamin-d-blood-levels-what-is-your-crp#axzz1jM5ziHrk

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on January 13, 2012
at 10:51 PM

You can get a test kit for $70 on the Vitamin D Council website.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on January 13, 2012
at 10:49 PM

Or Magnesium...

D5a4ff096a452a84a772efa0e6bc626e

(2486)

on January 13, 2012
at 10:19 PM

Vitamin D is fat soluble and excess does get stored at least somewhat. So ingesting too much causes problems not just while you're taking the supplements, but for potentially longer as your body works to balance out the lopsided stores.

537001f30670e73eb0ac45779af649a5

on January 13, 2012
at 10:11 PM

why did i get negative on this, the only bad thing that can happen with vitamin d od is you have diarrhea

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9 Answers

10
F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on January 13, 2012
at 08:57 PM

No mention of Vitamin A or Vitamin K consumption along with the Vitamin D.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on January 13, 2012
at 10:49 PM

Or Magnesium...

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on January 14, 2012
at 09:27 PM

Thanks. My first downvote :)

4
5fd34f9a735d223510165dab258f0f27

on January 14, 2012
at 07:46 AM

CRP is not a marker for just cardiovascular disease or the risk of cardiovascular disease; it's a marker for inflammation in any other part of the body. A person strains their muscle or has asymptomatic allergies, their CRP levels will elevate. Currently, there is no test that can directly relate CRP to cardiovascular disease. Also, the study was based on a comparison of the results of the CDC's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A multivariate analysis of a survey is not a good way to study the cause and effect of two particular variables. In my opinion, an experimental study should have been done after elimination of or controlling for other factors that may cause CRP levels to elevate such as an infection, smoking, insulin resistance, obesity, etc... The article notes that other studies that have been done with vitamin D and CRP status have had mixed results. Obviously more research is needed before anyone can actually state that high levels of vitamin D lead to CRP elevation.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on January 14, 2012
at 02:24 PM

cytokine arrays are the next step after HS CRP's If patients can afford them they are best. Right now HS cRP's can be done when the provider/patient understand what the test can do and cant do to get you to optimal and minimize risk. Plus one.

3
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 13, 2012
at 09:21 PM

Took a look at the notes for that research. Looks like they surveyd 15,000 people (good size) over the time period. But I see nothing on comparisons for the same person. It looked like they compared overall. So we don't know that a person with a low D in one year and a high D in another year had a high CRP (no cause and effect). We just know that this mass of people that had high D had high CRP. They tried to check 9 factors to see if they had an affect, but we don't know if it is something else causing it.

i.e. Interesting, but I don't see any reason to stop what I am doing.

1
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on January 14, 2012
at 02:18 AM

Epidemiology guys. Think about the confounders.

1
De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on January 13, 2012
at 09:53 PM

"Have your blood drawn and your levels checked"

Sounds like fine advice except it doesn't really work in America. The test is very cheap but tests like these seem to be a pet peeve of doctors. You might get your PCP to order one but periodically? They've already got too sick people to see.

Perfect Health Diet has a section near the end on over consumption of Vitamin D btw. Initially, cells start breaking it down or storing it in fat but eventually it gets overwhelmed and causes problems. Worse yet, when the fat is consumed the vitamin D is released which can cause problems later on too.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on January 13, 2012
at 10:51 PM

You can get a test kit for $70 on the Vitamin D Council website.

0
121a16aded2bed8dca492d3c9662ef4c

on March 02, 2012
at 02:53 PM

This doesn't pass the smell test for me.

Note the incremental difference in CRP levels measured - 0.06 mg/dL, or 0.6 mg/L CRP per 10 ng/mL 25(OH)D above 21 ng/mL.

I have had a CRP test done at least twice while taking vitamin D, and on the first test, my 25(OH)D was 66 ng/mL. Guess what my CRP level was? Undetectable low (below 0.2 mg/L).

A more recent test at a different lab showed it at 0.1 mg/L, and that was after the level had dropped to 21 ng/mL and I started correcting by supplementing 5000 IU vitamin D3 a day. I don't know what the resolution for the CRP test was, but I would be willing to bet that 0.1 is within the margin of error for the test. I had miserable skeletal pain at 21 ng/mL of 25(OH)D, and I wasn't making it up. We ordered the test because of the pain.

Of course, everybody is different, but my point here is this: everybody is different! If I don't take 5000 IU a day, my levels don't go above 30 ng/mL, and I will have symptoms.

I have to second the other posters. What else were these people doing? Were they nutritionally replete? Getting enough calcium, magnesium, vitamin K, vitamin A? All unlikely.

I would still be more comfortable somewhere between 40 and 60 ng/mL. The author of the study is right about one thing, though: knowing is better than guessing. Get tested.

EDIT: I just realized that I got my units mixed up, and I have fixed them.

0
Df7e22dbbb8c39f5006d0784feb03845

(175)

on January 14, 2012
at 03:01 PM

I don't know if taking a vitamin D test is a good investment.

I had my vitamin D tested after changing my ivory skin to medium beige. It came back at 36. Not overly high considering the amount of sun exposure I'd had. As a result, I still don't know if I need to supplement vitamin D in the winter. After my sun exposure, I went to my dermatologist with a spot on my face that appeared pre-cancerous. Much to her surprise, the sample she took did not test positive for cancer. She advised me that because I freckle easily and don't burn that my risk of skin cancer is much higher than someone who has ivory skin full-time. My mother has had NON-melanoma skin cancer 3 times. NON-melanoma is not related to vitamin D status; melonoma based skin cancer is.

I've observed that studies on vitamin D and certain types of cancer only show a correlation. It doesn't mean that because you increase your vitamin D status, that you won't get a certain type of cancer. That has never been proven.

As a result, I spent $60 on a test and I still have no idea how to proceed.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on January 14, 2012
at 04:08 PM

This article may be helpful:http://www.marksdailyapple.com/vitamin-d-sun-exposure-supplementation-and-doses/#axzz1jONubsVZ

-4
537001f30670e73eb0ac45779af649a5

on January 13, 2012
at 08:53 PM

In my opinion, i don't think you can have enough vitamin d. if you do, you shit it out your asshoel.

0faecc3397025eab246241f4dcd81f5e

(2361)

on January 14, 2012
at 01:00 AM

Excess vit D does not end up in the toilet, it ends up being stored, and then you absorb a ton of calcium which ends up in your blood vessels and muscle tissue, or maybe you pee out the calcium and get painful kidney stones.

537001f30670e73eb0ac45779af649a5

on January 13, 2012
at 10:11 PM

why did i get negative on this, the only bad thing that can happen with vitamin d od is you have diarrhea

D5a4ff096a452a84a772efa0e6bc626e

(2486)

on January 13, 2012
at 10:19 PM

Vitamin D is fat soluble and excess does get stored at least somewhat. So ingesting too much causes problems not just while you're taking the supplements, but for potentially longer as your body works to balance out the lopsided stores.

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