2

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Paleo-WAPF-permaculture-organic farming intentional communities?

Answered on August 27, 2016
Created June 12, 2012 at 2:34 PM

I see that this has already been discussed a little here. Would I be correct in saying that no such community exists at present, or at least that no such community is making itself publicly known?

It seems to me that it would make a lot of sense for people following this type of diet and wishing to shift towards a healthier lifestyle to start thinking about networking in order to buy up some organic farmland where it would be possible to establish an intentional farming community. In my experience the majority of current intentional communities are not following anything resembling a Paleo or WAPF diet.

In what I am envisioning, everyone entering the community would put in a certain amount of funds for startup, and then either already be running a business which would be viable if moved to a rural setting, or have a business plan for a farming/food artisan enterprise or other land based venture. This way there would be ultimate personal responsibility for one's share in the value of the land; if one's enterprise fails one always has the option of selling one's share.

The correct ratio of food producers : others would need to be decided on. There would then be a community funding pot to which everyone contributes a certain amount and which would be used for building communal structures/infastructure such as a central hub space, market/commercial space, kids' play space etc, and funding communal activities.

All that is then needed for this to gel together is some sort of constitution defining the desires of those who set up the community, regarding what they want and don't want to happen, upon which full consensus should be reached, and a procedure for council (general communication, making decisions, resolving disputes) such as talking stick circle. A co-operative legal structure is probably a good idea. How each 'household' would go about establishing itself, either in pre-existing structures or by building something new is something that is very particular to to the group of people and piece of land so I haven't given a template for how that might happen.

My main intention though is to start a discussion; I am new to this community and generally the online Paleo community, meanwhile have some knowledge and experience of farming. As I am in Europe and English-speaking I would consider Scotland, as it offers opportunities for clean water, land that has not been subjected to industrial agriculture, and woodland. But if any of what I have written here has been of interest to you do speak up, and similarly if you know of any other places on the net where you think it might be worth my while to post this, please let me know.

Someone to look up to get an idea for what my idea of farming is would be Sepp Holzer. There are some good videos floating around.

3020fb359dfbedaf90f1611b036d3432

(1138)

on August 22, 2012
at 10:17 PM

+1 for Kevin Carson

44b903861a648ca648cc175523fb60e2

(10)

on June 26, 2012
at 11:15 AM

Thanks for this, I've not yet had a chance to take a look at the links, not things I am familiar with with exception of Mr Wheaton, sounds interesting.

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on June 12, 2012
at 09:10 PM

I forgot to mention Christopher Alexander's Pattern Language. He has some very interesting 'patterns' for human living- one of them is called 'city fingers'- the idea here is that the pattern of human habitation looks a bit like human fingers, with the spaces being farmland. Of course, one has to start small, but I can imagine building a proper city if things are really successful.

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7 Answers

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7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on June 12, 2012
at 03:45 PM

Ah, yes. I daydream of the same thing.
Dunbar's number suggest optimal population, though it is a soft number, people have children, and you want to be able to host people so that they can learn how to do this stuff and go replicate it. Meanwhile, if you've been listening to Paul Wheaton, at all, you'll know one of the things he wants to be able to do is have people come to his place so that they can eat well and heal. This presents an interesting problem. Much like people move out of California due to high taxes, only to recreate a miniature version of West Coast hell in adjacent places, it is entirely possible for broken people to break whatever you've got going. So, you've got to have a solid core of people who are healthy and productive. Here is an interesting suggestion about the value of networks. If you take that with Dunbar's number, it probably makes sense to aim for a hundred people, especially if I'm right and n(log)n maps levels of specialization. So, seems crazy so far, right? Well not really, because if you research permaculture at all, you'll find out they can do amazing things with nature, but when they add people, things get really screwed up.
The best current legal setup I can think of right now would be an L3C. A lot of permaculture people seem to hate corporate structure, but an old fashioned version would serve very well. If your stock was basically the deed to your land, you'd have the incentive to vote (or let a CEO run the place) in ways that improves the whole place. One of the reasons corporations can be very bad now is that people have incentive to manipulate the stock price without regard to the long term value of the underlying business. Nobody will do that if they know they will be reducing their own property values. The incentives of a consensus model seem to be take everything and cry when people say no to you. Finally, I am looking forward to reading Kevin Carson's book The Homebrew Industrial Revolution. It sounds like he is exploring the implications of being able to return to home production of most things thanks to technological innovation. I've heard him a few times and he seems enthusiastic about permaculture as well.

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on June 12, 2012
at 09:10 PM

I forgot to mention Christopher Alexander's Pattern Language. He has some very interesting 'patterns' for human living- one of them is called 'city fingers'- the idea here is that the pattern of human habitation looks a bit like human fingers, with the spaces being farmland. Of course, one has to start small, but I can imagine building a proper city if things are really successful.

44b903861a648ca648cc175523fb60e2

(10)

on June 26, 2012
at 11:15 AM

Thanks for this, I've not yet had a chance to take a look at the links, not things I am familiar with with exception of Mr Wheaton, sounds interesting.

3020fb359dfbedaf90f1611b036d3432

(1138)

on August 22, 2012
at 10:17 PM

+1 for Kevin Carson

1
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on June 12, 2012
at 04:10 PM

May be worth spending some time in the Findhorn Community & the adjacent (& smaller) Woodhead Community in NE Scotland. I lived in Findhorn for 7 years & they have a lot of folk there wih LOTS of experience in starting/growing intetnional communities/co-housing.

http://www.diggersanddreamers.org.uk/index.php?fld=initial&val=W&one=dat&two=det&sel=woodhead

You may also find Joel Salatin's Polyface Farms organisational structure/farming methods helpful.

0
Medium avatar

on August 27, 2016
at 01:01 AM

 Hi, I am down with this if the people are HIGHLY CONSCIOUS. Let me know where you have gotten thus far with this idea. 

0
E791387b2829c660292308092dc3ca9b

(831)

on August 22, 2012
at 06:29 PM

Move to a small rural county in AR. :) Seriously the people there already live a subsistence lifestyle, they grow their own fruits and vegetables, they raise meat mainly on grass and they hunt and fish regularly to stock their freezers. The only difference between you and them will be you don't eat any grains or processed stuff. It takes a bit to integrate into the community but once they know you are there to stay and you aren't there to try and turn their rural heaven into the suburban hell you just came from they will like you just fine.

0
E8bf28bd28f5be7c34d4a1a97e7c1353

(253)

on August 22, 2012
at 02:15 PM

Dragon's Eye on the Big Island of Hawaii. http://dragonseyecenter.org/home/Welcome.html

Besides them there are a couple others on the Big Island that are paleo/WAP inspired. Belly Acres comes to mind as well.

0
C0c839648b31512515daaffe8e4e9ad1

on August 22, 2012
at 02:11 PM

I have heard that it could be similar to this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kibbutz

0
630c94db61d822a0855533fafbeb11bc

on August 21, 2012
at 10:05 PM

With the aim of developing a coherent theory, replicable template, and physical example for this, there's the Intentional Paleo Community group on Facebook. I'm not sure arranging a "paleo community" around abstracted capital and agricultural-state conceptions of land rights is any more consistent with "paleo" than grains, but I suppose that's a bigger conversation.

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