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Higher carbs lower fat diets versus lower carb higher fat diets on stress?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 30, 2013 at 3:55 PM

I recently have been looking into chronic stress and how it relates to chronic disease. C reactive protein seems To be the accepted scientific marker for measuring chronic stress and I ran across this article talking about different Macro ratio diets and their effect on C Reactive Protein. It seemed to find that high fat diets increased crp while high carb diets lowered crp. I know there's some Ray Peat followers here and I know that peat seems to think sugar is fine? But I digress.

If high carb low fat diets are more protective against crp(chronic stress) than high fat low carb diets than does this mean that high carb diets are healthier and should be followed? Why or why not?

http://www.pritikin.com/your-health/health-benefits/lower-cholesterol/811-which-diet-lowers-c-reactive-protein.html

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12672)

on April 30, 2013
at 07:37 PM

I'm not sure I agree with CRP being the accepted scientific marker of chronic stress. In fact I'm pretty confident it's not. Inflammation, maybe. But very imperfect for looking at stress.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12672)

on April 30, 2013
at 07:36 PM

I'm not sure I agree with CRP being *the* accepted scientific marker of chronic stress. In fact I'm pretty confident about it's not. Inflammation, maybe. But very imperfect for looking at stress.

A968017ef27f0a24abf64cc4460463a0

(142)

on April 30, 2013
at 05:42 PM

Lol, so I guess what you're saying is that pretty much anyone can find a study saying pretty much anything. Touché . I guess we'll have to wait on a meta-analysis to come out before we'll know for sure.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on April 30, 2013
at 04:47 PM

That is a good find! Also, it's great that that an open access study, so one can actually see ... well ... *the study*, and not just the abstract. :-)

A968017ef27f0a24abf64cc4460463a0

(142)

on April 30, 2013
at 04:34 PM

Also, exercise wasn't part of the program that I know of?http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17536128

A968017ef27f0a24abf64cc4460463a0

(142)

on April 30, 2013
at 04:30 PM

I think *

A968017ef27f0a24abf64cc4460463a0

(142)

on April 30, 2013
at 04:29 PM

It honk something that they definitely seem to gloss over is the role of protein in inflammation. In severely stressful states, like after severe burns the bodies need for protein can increase over 300%. Maybe the higher carb diets worked well here because the participants had solid protein sources and, like you said, we're exercising. Which means that glucose went towards shuttling protein into muscle cells. However I still think this has relevance towards optimal macros for sound health. Maybe this explains why some low carbers may come off as more lethargic and high carbers overlyenergized.

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2 Answers

3
Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on April 30, 2013
at 04:37 PM

Comparison of isocaloric very low carbohydrate/high saturated fat and high carbohydrate/low saturated fat diets on body composition and cardiovascular risk: http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/3/1/7

Inflammatory markers: Five subjects had C reactive protein (CRP) >15 mg/L at baseline or at the completion of the study and were excluded from the analysis. All diets resulted in a significant decrease in CRP with weight loss, independently of diet (p = 0.037).

Conclusion: Under isocaloric conditions VLCARB results in similar fat loss to other conventional dietary patterns although the greater percent weight loss is suggestive of a metabolic advantage. VLCARB resulted in equal improvements in most cardiovascular risk factors compared to conventional weight loss diets while the triacylglycerol reduction offset the LDL cholesterol rise. The more favorable effects of VLCARB on fasting and post prandial plasma insulin concentrations is a significant observation which indicates that this dietary pattern may be a useful strategy for the short-term management of subjects with insulin resistance and hypertriacylglycerolemia.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on April 30, 2013
at 04:47 PM

That is a good find! Also, it's great that that an open access study, so one can actually see ... well ... *the study*, and not just the abstract. :-)

A968017ef27f0a24abf64cc4460463a0

(142)

on April 30, 2013
at 05:42 PM

Lol, so I guess what you're saying is that pretty much anyone can find a study saying pretty much anything. Touché . I guess we'll have to wait on a meta-analysis to come out before we'll know for sure.

3
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on April 30, 2013
at 04:19 PM

You probably need a better reference article than from Pritikin, which is a biased, misleading origanization. They mention Atkins dieters CRP was raised by 25%, without mentioning initial and end results; they also mention high carb/low fat lowered CRP ... without mentioning that it was a diet fed to people who were exercising which lowers CRP.

CRP is produced as a means to combat inflammation. So high levels signal inflammation being worked on, while low levels likely mean that there is little inflammation. CRP is not a cause of CVD.

So, it's not that Pritikin is always going to be wrong, but they are always going to be biased - indeed, a lower fat, higher carb diet may work fantastically for some - but any diet that helps one to lower body mass and support an active lifestyle will help lower CRP.

There are different ways to combat inflammation, and in that pursuit it's unlikely that all inflammation anyone suffers from can be treated the same way.

A968017ef27f0a24abf64cc4460463a0

(142)

on April 30, 2013
at 04:34 PM

Also, exercise wasn't part of the program that I know of?http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17536128

A968017ef27f0a24abf64cc4460463a0

(142)

on April 30, 2013
at 04:30 PM

I think *

A968017ef27f0a24abf64cc4460463a0

(142)

on April 30, 2013
at 04:29 PM

It honk something that they definitely seem to gloss over is the role of protein in inflammation. In severely stressful states, like after severe burns the bodies need for protein can increase over 300%. Maybe the higher carb diets worked well here because the participants had solid protein sources and, like you said, we're exercising. Which means that glucose went towards shuttling protein into muscle cells. However I still think this has relevance towards optimal macros for sound health. Maybe this explains why some low carbers may come off as more lethargic and high carbers overlyenergized.

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