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Why is Crossfit (or Powerlifting or O-lifting) and Bodybuilding mutually exclusive

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 25, 2011 at 4:27 AM

It seems that many people on PH are crossfitters or some sort of lifter but at the same time express interests in improving body image over physical ability. I know typically the bodybuilding camp and the functional fitness camp have held each other as polar opposites, but why? Assuming your not looking to be competitor in said sport couldn't you do both? Couldn't do Chest and Back one day and Fran the next? Wouldn't a good set of bicep curls and tricep pull downs be nice ancillary work to clean and jerks? Does anyone follow a program that incorporates both?

Medium avatar

(19479)

on September 26, 2011
at 12:36 PM

Exactly. If you are a professional or high level amateur with aspirations of going pro, then sure, specificity is king, but for average joes (or should I say hacks) a combined approach works just fine.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on September 26, 2011
at 02:09 AM

I agree, I dont know why you would consider any of these exclusive at all? I mean unless you are actually a serious competitor in one of them, in which case "sports specific" exercise absolutely would take precedent in reaching your goals. Otherwise, in my view weekly, monthly, and yearly variety in your routine is optimal.

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6 Answers

5
Medium avatar

(19479)

on September 25, 2011
at 04:33 AM

I combine Crossfit style workouts (typically 1x per week) with olympic lifting (1-2x per week) powerlifting (2x per week) "bodybuilding" exercises (curls, triceps extensions, etc.) and some "functional" and sport specific exercises (stability ball tricks, hula hoop, dance, boxing, biking, etc.)

There is no reason why different systems need to be mutually exclusive.

I think that "hybrid vigor" absolutely applies to exercise.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on September 26, 2011
at 02:09 AM

I agree, I dont know why you would consider any of these exclusive at all? I mean unless you are actually a serious competitor in one of them, in which case "sports specific" exercise absolutely would take precedent in reaching your goals. Otherwise, in my view weekly, monthly, and yearly variety in your routine is optimal.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on September 26, 2011
at 12:36 PM

Exactly. If you are a professional or high level amateur with aspirations of going pro, then sure, specificity is king, but for average joes (or should I say hacks) a combined approach works just fine.

2
De65560c40ddb3f27764307ffa504240

on September 25, 2011
at 06:13 AM

Bodybuilders train for hypertrophy. One would be hard pressed to devise a routine worse for hypertrophy than CF, notwithstanding HQ's proclamations about the hierarchy of hypertrophy routines.

Crossfit is built on the philosophy that you should go all out every training session, with no particular goal in mind. That's the entire point as explicitly stated - to blow it all out every session on GPP. If you compete in GPP, it's ideal.

But I'm not aware of any sport, including powerlifting, which trains by that protocol. In fact, that's the opposite of how athletes train. I can't imagine a coach in any sport looking at the main site WOD, or any CF protocol, and thinking "that's what my athletes should do to get ready for our upcoming game/match/meet." That's not happening.

Athletes train for specific contests in specific sports. Trainers and athletes don't get paid for GPP. It's not that CF and bodybuilding or powerlifting are mutually exclusive, it's that CF and any actual specific sport are exclusive. I'm not saying that's bad or good, as I don't really care how other people train and I'm no longer involved in competitive sport.

Despite CF's increasing mainstream exposure, and my agreement that life should be more like birthday party, I'm not holding my breath for the legions of elite CF-trained athletes to expose my error. I suspect the Kenyans, Westsiders, NFLers, and Mr. Olympians are equally ill-prepared for the onslaught.

1
Ae3a2923d13d0c2c99f2c215c21940b4

on September 25, 2011
at 08:49 AM

I can't really offer a lot of nutrional or training science, as in the above posts, but I can offer my own personal experience with a trnasition from body building to CF:

I used to spend ~2 hours per day in the gym, lifing in accordance with the traditional "muscle group" schema (Leg Day, Chest Day, etc.). I coupled this with about an hour of fairly intense cardio 3~4 days per week. My weightlifting was focused primarily towards muscular development, scultpting and building bulk, (although my main athletic outlet was running & off-road triathlon ...kinda mutually counter-productive, I know). I wanted to be a competitive, i.e. "fast" triathlete, but at the same didn't want to look like a thin, frail Paula Newby Frasier while doing it. Most of my tradional lifitng focused on muscle isolations, and were very "body-bulding" influcenced. The areas that I really also thought were lacking in girth and that I wanted to bulk up were my shoulders, arms and neck, but I utilmately never seemed to build any mass in those threee areas despite the BB regimens, ueber-protein intense nutrition and weight increases I was applying.

Then - once the "Muscle & Fitness" brain-washing wore off - I discovered CF (and the Zone, ..then Paleo). Oly Lifting was very tough for me at first, as I'd never had to actually exercise any kind of real technique in my lifting or core stability (especially when half of was done on a machine). Through trial & error I've been able to apply proper Oly technique, but don't heft nearly the amounts of weight that I was using in the traditional body building regimen. The results: I've gained significant mass in my shoulders, arms, and neck, through nothing other than random CF work-outs consisting of occasional Oly lifting and just plain 'ole zone/paleo nutrition. Whoda thunk it? That taking a nearly random approach to lifiting and nutrition would result in the very appearance benefits that I just never could reap with traditional, focused isolation lifiting. ...Food for thought.

1
25b139cc1954456d9ea469e40f984cd3

on September 25, 2011
at 07:05 AM

I know typically the bodybuilding camp and the functional fitness camp have held each other as polar opposites, but why?

Joe Weider;) Prior to Weider, bodybuilding competitions featured both posing routines and functional demonstrations of strength; Weider got rid of the latter and presided over the arms-race like increase in drug usage which lead competitors onstage from embodying the epitome of health to being virtually at death's door.

http://www.amazon.com/Muscletown-USA-Hoffman-Culture-Barbell/dp/0271018550

http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_interviews/the_dark_side_of_bodybuilding

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andreas_M%C3%BCnzer http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohammed_Benaziza

Bodybuilding minus the drugs, or with drug usage kept to a healthy minimum (and yes, bodybuilding drugs can be used in non-harmful ways) is exceedingly beneficial and nothing at all like what goes on in the IFBB.

0
59a0f8708095c535e44ff8b823d2dff5

on August 31, 2013
at 06:50 AM

Basically power lifting is one of the difficult that i have been never faced before. Some of techniques are quite danger and aggresive to perform. Body building and lifting are mutually pressured on neuro-muscles acting. So if you have problems with that you have to consult a Muscle Tissue Enhacement physician here.

http://www.hyperfuel9xprice.com/

0
C9584272ce54888b662a803c9061664d

on August 31, 2013
at 06:41 AM

Crossfit is the best portal on the web i have found so far in order to build your body through natural and effective means. One should follow the experts who are there to guide you. http://www.no2maximus-reviews.com/

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