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Please help! Prosciutto ham craving! Must.East.Ham!

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 20, 2012 at 8:47 PM

I have never been into the Prosciutto ham thing, but ever since I started Paleo, I've bought packs just to eat a couple of slices a day. It's not a craving that can get away, but I wonder what does Prosciutto ham has that I need as nutrient (perhaps?). I also love sushi/sashimi; prosciutto ham is pretty "raw" and there's must be a way out of this. I want to cook it, not eat it straight out of the package!

Thanks for any help!

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on October 23, 2012
at 06:14 AM

It is a *fermented food* with lactic acid bacteria.

D1728f99db66ff91d695a6df5cd38b02

(1368)

on June 22, 2012
at 12:18 AM

I went through a stage where I wanted to eat smoked salmon. Craved it, needed it ate 5 12 oz packages in a week. I took a whole 12 oz package to work one day and ate it for morning tea. Made me feel unwell. Don't crave smoked salmon after that, in fact I haven't eaten it since. Prosciutto however, is too expensive to eat that much... I don't know if I could overdose on prosciutto, so delicious. If u want to stop ur craving u could try it lol. But I think it would ruin your love for the ham. Doesn't seem like you want to stop eating it completely!

3e0c144fb302c9f26eeb14e5e315ec51

(45)

on June 21, 2012
at 02:50 AM

Thank you so much! Will fetch the nitrate information; this perked my curiosity. It says ham and sea salt. LOTS of salt. And here I thought beef jerky would take care of that problem! I have the prosciutto recipe with the asparagus waiting for me; it's just that the prosciutto never made it ;) Several prosciutto recipes got them uncooked which is what I prefer. Yes, it's as primal as it gets! ITA with that sentiment. For those that have one nearby, it's Wegman's brand. I have been on "Paleo" almost a month, so been through a lot of changes.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on June 20, 2012
at 11:04 PM

I also agree you might be needing salt.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on June 20, 2012
at 09:53 PM

+1 for the sodium suggestion. Totally matches my experience.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on June 20, 2012
at 08:59 PM

Maybe salt? Sometimes when people ditch the processed junk and stick to mostly whole, unprocessed, real foods, salt/sodium intake drops like a stone. (I guess prosciutto is "processed" in the sense that it's cured/preserved, but it's certainly not what most of us consider a processed food.) You might want to try adding a little salt to your meals. (Especially soups and stews if you make those...you don't need a ton, but it sometimes brings out other flavors nicely.)

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6 Answers

1
Medium avatar

(3213)

on June 20, 2012
at 11:15 PM

Prosciutto is as primal as it gets, i don't see any harm in eating it everyday. Don't cook it, you'll lose the precious taste you're paying a lot of money for.

1
19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on June 20, 2012
at 11:03 PM

How abour chopped proscuito with a cold cucumber salad.

Or with cubed honey melon.

Or roasted wrapped around asparagus. Make some hollaindaise sauce and poached egg and you-'ve got yourself a meal.

You could cook sheets of proscuito in an omelet.

Wrap on chicken breast and bake, pound the breast and fill it with a spinach or basil sauce.

3e0c144fb302c9f26eeb14e5e315ec51

(45)

on June 21, 2012
at 02:50 AM

Thank you so much! Will fetch the nitrate information; this perked my curiosity. It says ham and sea salt. LOTS of salt. And here I thought beef jerky would take care of that problem! I have the prosciutto recipe with the asparagus waiting for me; it's just that the prosciutto never made it ;) Several prosciutto recipes got them uncooked which is what I prefer. Yes, it's as primal as it gets! ITA with that sentiment. For those that have one nearby, it's Wegman's brand. I have been on "Paleo" almost a month, so been through a lot of changes.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on June 20, 2012
at 11:04 PM

I also agree you might be needing salt.

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on October 23, 2012
at 12:21 PM

I love prosciutto. I eat it straight from the butcher, I stuff chicken breasts with it, I cube it and put it with my eggs and frittata, I wrap figs and asparagus and grill, I oven roast it....

This may not be a craving built around a nutritional deficiency, it is more likely a craving built around deliciousness.

0
Cf5dc81ed9b0c1fc8206cf5d1cc33c29

on October 23, 2012
at 03:52 AM

Strictly speaking, prosciutto means "ham" in Italian. Therefore, it generically refers to the pork cut, and not to its specific preparation. So in Italian there is a disctinction between prosciutto crudo (literally "raw ham", that is to say cured ham, which English speakers refer to as "prosciutto") and prosciutto cotto ("cooked ham", which is similar to what English speakers call "ham", as a derivative of the pork cut).

The process of making prosciutto can take anywhere from nine to eighteen months, depending on the size of the ham. First the ham is cleaned, salted, and left for about two months. Next it is washed several times to remove the salt. It is then hung in a shady, airy place. The air is important to the final quality of the ham. The ham is left until dry. This takes a variable amount of time, depending on the local climate, and size of the ham. When the ham is completely dry, it is hung in an airy place at room temperature for up to eighteen months.

Interestingly, prosciutto is never cured with nitrates (either sodium or potassium), which are generally used in ham production to produce the desired rosy color and unique flavor. Only sea salt is used. The pigmentation seems to be produced by certain bacteria, rather than a direct chemical reaction.

Prosciutto crudo in Italian cuisine is usually served as an antipasto, sliced tissue-paper thin and optionally wrapped around grissini or, especially in summer, melon.

Protected designation of origin

Under the Common Agricultural Policy of the European Union, certain well-established meat products including some local prosciutto, are covered by a Protected Designation of Origin and other, less stringent designations of geographical origin for traditional specialties.

There are two famous types of prosciutto crudo exported abroad: prosciutto di Parma, from Parma, and prosciutto di San Daniele, from the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region, which is darker in color and sweeter in flavor.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on October 23, 2012
at 06:14 AM

It is a *fermented food* with lactic acid bacteria.

0
6cb9eb6228b5c0c358e4ac28f71a391d

on June 20, 2012
at 09:07 PM

Does your brand have nitrates? These can actually lead to cravings if you have an intolerance to nitrates. I used to crave certain products containing what I know now through blood work are actual severe intolerances. (I used to love tofu and crave Asian food), I have a severe soy intolerance. The same is also true for Indian food cravings, I would get takeout and started making my own several times a week, turns out I am severely intolerant to turmeric!

You would think your body wouldn't want what you are allergic/sensitive too, but I found the cravings insane! The interesting this is, after eliminating them, the thought of eating those foods now repulses me.

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