2

votes

too much junk in my trunk

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 05, 2011 at 9:35 PM

Hi, I feel like my question is pretty basic, but I think the answer might be complicated. How do I lean out? Here's a little background on me. I'm a 28yr old female. 5'11". 185lbs (give or take 5lbs). My measurements are: 36.5", 36", 43". Before the age of 23, I was really inactive. In the last five years I've completely changed my lifestyle into a very active one. In the last two years I started eating Paleo (strict) and doing crossfit-esque exercise, as well as lots of other forms of exercise. I'm a busy hairstylist, and I stand on my feet all day. Most of the time my at work meals are eaten at lightening speed, but at home I make an effort to slow down. My sleep is pretty good, getting an average of eight hours per night. I'm not overtrained, and I train smart. Nevertheless, I still have a considerable amount of body fat. In the last month I tried opting for a cyclic ketogenic diet to try to cut some chub. During the week I ate lots of good fats and protein, while only eating leafy green and cruciferous veggies. On Saturdays I would eat about two cups of sweet potato to "carb up", and replace the glycogen in my muscles.

So... in the last few weeks I have managed to pack on about six pounds on the scale, and a noticeable amount of belly fat. Does anybody know what happened here? According to almost every resource I can find, what I was doing should have made me lose fat. I'd love to hear your thoughts. Thank you!

A124f3fe721369a69020d7702dc36ab9

(110)

on December 08, 2011
at 03:53 AM

One supplement that could help is Spirulina. The iodine in it, I'm told, is good for the thyroid. If you improve after taking it, then it might be good to get the thyroid investigated.

Ab5da2cf814773d1e7454460dd069617

(20)

on December 07, 2011
at 03:02 AM

I've considered that a possibility. I don't think it's my cruciferous vegetable intake though, because they are almost all cooked. Who wants to eat raw kale? Bleh.

Ab5da2cf814773d1e7454460dd069617

(20)

on December 07, 2011
at 02:59 AM

Also, I should add. I'm not just trying to lose "weight". I'm trying to keep my lean muscle mass that I've worked so hard to grow, while losing my stubborn body fat. Years ago, I used to be thinner and had almost no muscle tone. I was really into cycling, and carboloading.

Ab5da2cf814773d1e7454460dd069617

(20)

on December 07, 2011
at 02:54 AM

Sorry, I got trigger happy on that response. What do you consider a small amount of carbs? Two cups of mashed sweet potato only has 100g of carbs, and anything under 50g of carbs is still considered "low carb".

Ab5da2cf814773d1e7454460dd069617

(20)

on December 07, 2011
at 02:51 AM

For the last two years, I've basically been eating a general "Paleo" diet, including carbalicious foods (ex: sweet potatoes, butternut squash). It's only in the last month that I've made a concerted effort to eat the Paleo diet with the goal of weight loss. I thought I was going the right route by eating very energy-dense foods like fat and protein, to then put my body in a state of ketosis.

Ab5da2cf814773d1e7454460dd069617

(20)

on December 07, 2011
at 02:35 AM

Yeah, during the week I omit any kind of starchy stuff for Saturday morning. Annie: I'm worried to cut out all starcy carbs because of my exercise load. I'd be concerned that my body would feel lethargic and low on glycogen stores. Have you experience that?

Ab5da2cf814773d1e7454460dd069617

(20)

on December 07, 2011
at 02:29 AM

Yeah it's for sure not muscle gain...and yes I was due for my cycle, but it's past that time and I still have more chub.

6670b38baf0aae7f4d8ac2463ddc37c0

(3946)

on December 06, 2011
at 04:24 AM

I've found that I pack on the pounds if I add carbs to a ketogenic diet. If you really want to add carbs, try adding smaller amounts directly after a workout. Two cups of sweet potato a week would make me gain a similar amount of weight as you did.

6670b38baf0aae7f4d8ac2463ddc37c0

(3946)

on December 06, 2011
at 04:17 AM

I've found that I pack on the pounds if I add carbs to a ketogenic diet. If you really want to add carbs, try adding smaller amounts directly after a workout. Two cups of sweet potato a week would make me gain a similar amount amount of weight as you did.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on December 05, 2011
at 11:20 PM

Do you remember where you saw the paper on sex differences in recovery shakes? I'd love to read it.

296fbdcfaf4009a514522597bbbe6700

(30)

on December 05, 2011
at 10:24 PM

Btw, I don't want to be all "eat salads with grilled fish", but there is a reason that is a standard approach.

296fbdcfaf4009a514522597bbbe6700

(30)

on December 05, 2011
at 10:22 PM

Seems unlikely to be muscle since she mentions belly fat specifically. Also muscle is super hard to add, and even a man would have a hard time adding 1 lb muscle per week.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on December 05, 2011
at 09:46 PM

I think that she means that leafy green and cruciferous veggies were the only kinds of veggies that she was eating in addition to her good fats and protein - in other words, she saved the starchy stuff for Saturday morning refeed, but otherwise stayed away.

83d6a06c93bb3490dbca339cbbb63385

(526)

on December 05, 2011
at 09:42 PM

"During the week I ate lots of good fats and protein, while only eating leafy green and cruciferous veggies" How does that work?

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4 Answers

3
296fbdcfaf4009a514522597bbbe6700

on December 05, 2011
at 10:21 PM

Men and women seem to need different nutrient balance. It seems that women need more carbs --- the literature finds that after weight lifting women benefit from more carbs in their recovery shakes than men (4:1 carb:protein ratio is what I've learned). Separately women may gain weight with energy-dense foods like nuts, coconut, cream, and cheese, and maybe even fatty meat. Have you tried reducing energy-dense foods? The books on women's weight lifting could help, by people like Rachel Cosgrove, Cassandra Forsythe, the Women's Health Book of Exercises, etc.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on December 05, 2011
at 11:20 PM

Do you remember where you saw the paper on sex differences in recovery shakes? I'd love to read it.

296fbdcfaf4009a514522597bbbe6700

(30)

on December 05, 2011
at 10:24 PM

Btw, I don't want to be all "eat salads with grilled fish", but there is a reason that is a standard approach.

Ab5da2cf814773d1e7454460dd069617

(20)

on December 07, 2011
at 02:51 AM

For the last two years, I've basically been eating a general "Paleo" diet, including carbalicious foods (ex: sweet potatoes, butternut squash). It's only in the last month that I've made a concerted effort to eat the Paleo diet with the goal of weight loss. I thought I was going the right route by eating very energy-dense foods like fat and protein, to then put my body in a state of ketosis.

Ab5da2cf814773d1e7454460dd069617

(20)

on December 07, 2011
at 02:59 AM

Also, I should add. I'm not just trying to lose "weight". I'm trying to keep my lean muscle mass that I've worked so hard to grow, while losing my stubborn body fat. Years ago, I used to be thinner and had almost no muscle tone. I was really into cycling, and carboloading.

0
A124f3fe721369a69020d7702dc36ab9

(110)

on December 05, 2011
at 10:20 PM

Ab5da2cf814773d1e7454460dd069617

(20)

on December 07, 2011
at 03:02 AM

I've considered that a possibility. I don't think it's my cruciferous vegetable intake though, because they are almost all cooked. Who wants to eat raw kale? Bleh.

A124f3fe721369a69020d7702dc36ab9

(110)

on December 08, 2011
at 03:53 AM

One supplement that could help is Spirulina. The iodine in it, I'm told, is good for the thyroid. If you improve after taking it, then it might be good to get the thyroid investigated.

0
C00e493393828df34be65ddc25456c7c

(610)

on December 05, 2011
at 10:01 PM

Are you due for your cycle? How many calories are you having? Perhaps you have gained some muscle?

Ab5da2cf814773d1e7454460dd069617

(20)

on December 07, 2011
at 02:29 AM

Yeah it's for sure not muscle gain...and yes I was due for my cycle, but it's past that time and I still have more chub.

296fbdcfaf4009a514522597bbbe6700

(30)

on December 05, 2011
at 10:22 PM

Seems unlikely to be muscle since she mentions belly fat specifically. Also muscle is super hard to add, and even a man would have a hard time adding 1 lb muscle per week.

-1
59366bd8878d7364cd12cccd8aa5d49f

on December 05, 2011
at 11:01 PM

You've discovered that eating lots of proteins and fats is a 'rich' diet. Your ancestors would have very rarely been able to eat like that! Here's a video by a non-corp doc called "Diet, Drugs and Diabetes - One Hundred Years of Missed Opportunities" and it is all about the 'diseases of affluence.' http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iosoXlr3ZVI

Humans are starch eaters. We have at least a half-dozen different enzymes that break down starch, way more than a frequent meat-eater would need. Most of us do not have Inuit ancestors!

Another thing humans can do these days is drink calorie-laden beverages. I would avoid these.

Dr. McDougall recently wrote about vegan Steve Jobs in his newsletter. "Steve Jobs gave tacit permission and encouragement for me to write this newsletter article about the medical and nutritional aspects of his life when he commissioned his biographer to tell a true account. ???I wanted my kids to know about me?????? ???Also, when I got sick, I realized other people would write about me if I died, and they wouldn???t know anything. They???d get it all wrong. So I wanted to make sure someone heard what I had to say.???

http://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2011nl/nov/jobs.htm

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