2

votes

Crock Pots : How long does it take them to boil water?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 25, 2011 at 4:54 PM

I bought a crock pot recently to start some decent gut healing. I don't like following recipes, so I just threw bones in the pot, salt, vinegar, onions, kale and some whole kurkuma (that stuff is so expensive :P )

I put it on "high" 3 hours ago and it's warm but not simmering. Not boiling at all either. Should I wait 3 more hours?

The crock pot is in a cold room (the only room apart from my bedroom where I'm allowed to cook with the crock pot : the other rooms are used by my family). Is that a bad idea?

Oh, and if I manage to make a good stock, what should I do with it? Drink it like that?

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on December 26, 2011
at 04:46 AM

I boil marrow bones separately with a cup of vinegar. After 2 hours, the meat should have seprated from the bone. If not, I take my knife and fork and separate them from the bone myself. Then I throw away the marrow bone since there's nothing else remaining.

D5c8768927c463b363b109f18b7c16c4

(375)

on December 25, 2011
at 10:20 PM

@ bc4work It's turmeric

8838443ac82e9f98e4ae9daf80d50eb5

(896)

on December 25, 2011
at 06:54 PM

What is Kurkuma?

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 25, 2011
at 06:16 PM

It depends on what kind of bones, too. I slow-cooked a beef foot (sliced length-wise) and it took 2 full days of alternating cooking/chilling before the hoof bones were fully clean and the hoof was tender enough to eat.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on December 25, 2011
at 05:44 PM

Oh, right. Thanks Nance!

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6 Answers

4
D5c8768927c463b363b109f18b7c16c4

(375)

on December 25, 2011
at 05:30 PM

I happened to read crack-pot for some reason. I think crock pots simmer, not boil. But you could try adding pre-boiled water to it. Stock by itself is good, or add to stir-fry, chill it etc

4
F02990386b12528111740ad6279ba29d

(1363)

on December 25, 2011
at 05:28 PM

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080109140202AAfyGME

Helpful information in that link.

Water boils at 212 degrees Fahrenheit.

3
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 25, 2011
at 05:34 PM

Slow-cooking is just that. After 6-8 hours I normally see a little bubbling but a simmer is the norm and it takes a few hours to reach that. I cook marrow bones 4 hours on high, then 8 hours on low. I chill overnight and if the bones are extremely clean I remove them and add vegetables. If the bones aren't clean, I cook 4 hours on high and they're usually clean then so I add vegetables and cook 8 hours on low. I chill overnight and cook 4 on high or 8 on low based on when we want to eat.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on December 25, 2011
at 05:44 PM

Oh, right. Thanks Nance!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 25, 2011
at 06:16 PM

It depends on what kind of bones, too. I slow-cooked a beef foot (sliced length-wise) and it took 2 full days of alternating cooking/chilling before the hoof bones were fully clean and the hoof was tender enough to eat.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on December 26, 2011
at 04:46 AM

I boil marrow bones separately with a cup of vinegar. After 2 hours, the meat should have seprated from the bone. If not, I take my knife and fork and separate them from the bone myself. Then I throw away the marrow bone since there's nothing else remaining.

1
559a1bf85bfe38a0fbbf56377c7278b4

on December 26, 2011
at 09:14 AM

To get things moving quickly I warm the pot and pour in boiling water. Tender meats like whole chickens and bacon joints cook in about 4 hours on "high" (the left-over stock/broth is delicious). I get a very gentle simmering action, where the water moves very slightly, after a couple of hours.

1
3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

on December 26, 2011
at 04:56 AM

I don't have a crock pot but have often thought about getting one, since I always have bone broth for dinner. I use a big stainless-steel pot to cook my beef broth veggie soup. I boil the marrow bones separately in a smaller pot. At most, I spend 4 hours, as all my bones separate easily from the marrows: I pour a cup of vinegar and use a wooden chopstick to push out the marrows, if they don't come out. Then I take my knife and fork to separate any meat still attached to the bones. I throw away the bones, then.

I have not purchased a crock pot, however, as they don't seem to be stainless steel. Are there stainless-steel crock pots? Any reservations in cooking something for that long in a pot that's not stainless steel?

0
42d10468a999874f2a9e101ec2031e3f

on March 18, 2014
at 06:23 PM

Well I see that a definitive answer as to whether or not it will come to a boil on high settings wasn't really forth coming. I too have a Crock Pot that has Off Low & High and am looking to boil noodles and we'll see when I do this today.

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